Council Agenda Preview – May 18, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

The only thing that caught my eye was the impending approval of a zoning by-law amendment to permit the development of a 36-unit residential property on Tower Hill close to Forest Street. (10.4.1). Also take a look at the items listed in the Closed Session agenda. There isn’t much information, but the items look interesting and will probably surface on the open agenda in the not too distant future.

Council Meeting Agenda (Abridged)

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, (Performance Reviews re: Director of Finance; Director of Public Works);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (Summons served on Town in response to enforcement of property standards and fire code by-laws)
h) information explicitly supplied in confidence to the municipality or local board by Canada, a province or territory or a Crown agency of any of them, (Parry Sound Area Recreation & Culture Centre update)

Correspondence
4.1 – Alhan Rahimi, 59 Emily Street.

Request that Council advocate & adopt policies that support sustainable home price increases.

4.2 – Yvonne Heaman.
Support for Town’s denial of construction of a vehicle bridge over Fitness Trail.

4.3 – Residents petition to Town of Parry Sound.
Refuse the demand for a bridge over the Fitness Trail and Rabbit Canyon, and that Rabbit Canyon remain open.

Deputations
5.1 – Andrea McIntyre.

Establishing Fundraising efforts to purchase Rabbit Canyon property for Public Use.

5.2 – Diana Clements, Principal Parry Sound Forest School.
Request for “Children at Play Sign” on Parry Sound Drive.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Delegation Topics for the 2021 AMO Conference.

Direction
That staff be directed to submit a request to delegate with the appropriate Provincial Minister on the following topics:
1. Property tax exemption under Section 3(1)12iii of the Assessment Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. A.31, “Relief of the Poor; and
2. Curbing the rising cost of municipal insurance premiums.

9.2.1 – Reserve funds returned from Belvedere to participating area municipalities.
Resolution
That Council approves the transfer of $ $61,684 received from Belvedere to a Long- Term Care Reserve for the purpose of assisting in offsetting any future levy increases.

9.4.1 – Request to stop-up and close a portion of the Ashwood Drive Road Allowance.
Resolution

That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound directs staff to bring a stop- up-and-closure By-law for the Ashwood Drive Road (Themer, 60a Seguin Street) allowance, and further that:
1. The applicant submits a deposit of $5,000 to pay for the costs associated with public advertisement, an appraisal, and legal costs;
2. Assuming arrangements can benegotiated to the Town’s satisfaction, that the survey and transaction ensure that a 7.7 metre-wide strip of land be deeded to 58 Seguin Street, that any historic encroachments from 60 Seguin Street be deeded accordingly, and that the balance of the lands be deeded to 60a Seguin Street; and
3. Any easements for utilities and services be surveyed and registered accordingly.

9.5.1 – Request Approval for Temporary Storage of Asbestos at Airport.
Resolution

THAT Whereas the Municipality of McDougall in a letter dated March 25, 2021, has authorized Soundseals Insulation to dispose of non-hazardous materials and asbestos material per regulations at the McDougall Landfill Site at 214 McDougall Road; and
Whereas Soundseals Insulation has submitted a request to the Town of Parry Sound and to the Township of Seguin for permission to temporarily store asbestos at their facilities located at the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport, owned jointly by the Town of Parry Sound, and the Township of Seguin; and
Whereas the Town has been advised that storage of said asbestos is anticipated to occur only in cases where Soundseals Insulation has been unable to meet the day-end closure time of the McDougall Landfill Site and that asbestos will remain in vehicles within its closed and locked facility at the Airport for next earliest delivery and disposal at the McDougall Landfill Site , and
Whereas the Municipal Airport Commission is responsible for overseeing the operation the Municipal Airport; and
Whereas the Town has been advised that the Municipal Airport Commission has agreed to this proposal so long as Soundseals operates in accordance with regulations;
Now therefore the Town of Parry Sound, as joint landowner of the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport, hereby agrees to permit Soundseals Insulation to store asbestos in its vehicles and parked within its locked facilities at the Municipal Airport for earliest transport and disposal at the McDougall Landfill Site, upon the following conditions:
That the Township of Seguin provides similar approval;
That Soundseals Insulation abides by all regulations, and all necessary approvals remain in force;
6. That prior to expiry, Soundseals Insulation provides to the Town annually, a copy of its Certificate of Insurance in an amount no less than $5 million, adding the Town of Parry Sound as an additional insured;
7. That the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport Commission as landlord, enters into an amended lease agreement with Soundseals Insulation, naming the Town of Parry Sound and the Township of Seguin as additional insured, the requirement to annually provide a Certificate of Insurance to the land owners and any other amendments the Commission deems appropriate.

9.5.2 – Enforcement of By-laws.
Resolution

That staff respond to by-law complaints utilizing an enforcement approach consistent with established practice for all complaints without regard for expected future changes to existing bylaws.

9.5.3 – OPP Detachment Board Proposal.
Resolution.
That Whereas the Community Safety and Policing Act, (CSPA), 2019 calls for the end of Community Police Advisory Committees (CPACs) and the creation of Ontario Provincial (OPP) Police Detachment Boards; and
Whereas the Ministry of the Solicitor General has developed an OPP detachment board framework that will allow affected municipalities and First Nations the flexibility to create a board that reflects community and local needs, and
Whereas the Ministry of the Solicitor General has asked municipalities and First Nations within a detachment area to work together to determine the composition of their board and the manner in which they will submit their proposal to the Ministry; and
Whereas members of the existing West Parry Sound District CPAC have indicated interest in establishing a Board representative of CPAC municipalities and First Nations,
Now Therefore Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby supports submission by the CPAC representative from the Municipality of McDougall to the Province of Ontario, the Ontario Provincial Police Detachment Board Proposal substantially in the form attached, representing the 7 West Parry Sound Area municipalities and Henvey Inlet First Nation with the following additional considerations/proposals:
1. That the following be included as administrative resources/infrastructure required to support the establishment of the detachment board:
a) administrative support for taking minutes of meetings, prepare, distribute and publish agendas and meeting notices, prepare draft policy documents, administer expenses, prepare annual reports and cost estimates, and maintain board records;
b) secure place for records, meeting location, electronic requirements;
c) establish funding requirements;
d) personal accident insurance;
e) legal advice;
f) honorariums;
g) ongoing training;
h) travel and meals;
i) advertising; and
j) any other administrative resources/infrastructure common to a Board;
2. That it be clarified with the province, that funding for these resources/infrastructure be through the province as the establishment of detachment boards is an initiative of the province;
3. That in an effort to reduce duplication of effort and training, that the Board be established upon the 2022 Municipal Election;
And Further that this resolution be forwarded to the municipalities within the West Parry Sound District and Henvey Inlet First Nation.

By-laws
10.2.1 – Striking tax rates for fiscal year 2021.

By-law 2021 – 7131
Being a bylaw to Strike the Tax Rates for Municipal Purposes for the Year 2021.

10.2.2 – Business Improvement Area (BIA) Levy By-law – Downtown Business Area.
By-law 2021 – 7132
Being a By-law to adopt the estimates of the Board of Management of the Downtown Parry Sound Business Improvement Area and to strike the tax rate thereon for the year 2021.

10.3.1 – Provincial Fuel Tax Rebate Agreement.
By-law 2021 – 7134
Being a By-law to authorize an Agreement with Holly Transportation Services Inc. for Provincial Fuel Tax Rebate.

10.3.2 – TOPdesk Information Technology Service Management and Asset Management system procurement through the Ontario Education Collaborative Market Place (OECM).
By-law 2021 – 7135
Being a bylaw to authorize the execution of a Master Agreement, and Customer Supplier Agreement with TOPdesk Canada Inc. for a user support ticket and inventory management software.

10.4.1 – Zoning By-law Amendment – George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Prasher) – 36 Unit Residential Proposal.
By-Law 2021 – 7133
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Prasher).

Council Minutes (Abridged) – May 4, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

What seemed to be a light agenda resulted in a meeting that included a number of unexpected items worth noting. I won’t point out anything in particular but I recommend scanning the abridged meeting minutes below. The Questions of Staff section was particularly interesting.

Abridged Council Meeting Minutes

Closed Session
d) labour relations or employee negotiations, (hiring policy interpretation);
(e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (Contractor work on Town property), (Planning Board decision);
f) advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose, (hiring policy interpretation), (Contractor work on Town property), (Planning Board decision).

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof
1.4.1 – Councillor Horne declared pecuniary interest on item 10.4.2 regarding boat launches and parking on Salt Dock Road, as he is a property owner and resident on Salt Dock Road. Councillor Horne left the meeting for duration of the item, did not participate in discussion, nor vote on the item.

Public Meeting
2.1 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/21-04 – 9 and 11 Church Street (FAD Architects on behalf of Gromov).
Council held a public meeting to consider a proposed Zoning By-law amendment under Sections 34 of the Planning Act, as amended. After the Mayor adjourned the regular meeting and declared the public meeting open, the Clerk advised that notice had been given by prepaid first-class mail to the required prescribed agencies and property owners within 120 metres, posted on the property and placed on the Town’s website.
Mr. Elgie advised that the proposed Zoning By-Law amendment would change the zoning of the property from C1 on 11 Church Street and amend the S.P. 26.119(h) on 9 Church Street to permit a mixed-use building with a commercial ground floor and 20 residential spaces.
In response to the Mayor’s invitation to address Council, Matt Ryan of FAD Architects, spoke on behalf of the developer Gromov in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment. Mr. Ryan said that he thinks the project focuses development within the urban area, strengthens the central business district as a prime location and place to live, and is in keeping with the Town’s Official Plan. Mr. Ryan said that one of the tools at our disposal to help fight effects of climate change is to reduce dependence on a car and to do that, we need to stop spreading development outward, by increasing density, so that we create more walkable, liveable communities; and projects like this are key to that concept.
No one spoke in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment.
Mr. Elgie advised that he had received a couple requests for information, but no formal comments yet with regards to this matter.
The Mayor advised that Council, at its discretion may approve the proposed Zoning By- law amendment and if so, must either circulate notice of passing of the by-law or give notice in the local press. Objections to the passing of the by-law will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal. If an appeal is submitted and the appellant has not provided Council with an oral or written submission before the passing of the by-law, the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal may choose to dismiss the appeal.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Mayor McGarvey’s inquiry as to the reason trees were cut down on Gibson Street near Market Square Park, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that as a result of tree limbs falling on private property near vehicles and the adjacent sidewalk, a board certified arborist was consulted to assess these large trees. After reviewing from a number of perspectives, including viable growth within the crown, the arborist determined that they were not candidates for maintenance, and removal was the only viable option to remove the hazards posed by the trees.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry regarding the public consultation process to the Official Plan, Manager of Building and Planning Services Taylor Elgie concurred that it is a lengthy process. Plans were in place last spring for an open house, which was cancelled because of COVID. An open house with large maps available for viewing is useful to make the information accessible for people; providing the information on-line is less interactive and therefore the process has been delayed. Mr. Elgie reported that the department is trying to move the process forward with an open house or equivalent in the next 4-6 months, including potential for on-line consultation and review. He also noted that people can contact him by phone, e-mail, letter, etc. if an open house doesn’t work. The Open house is followed by a mandatory public meeting, after which errors are corrected, and then final approval granted at a subsequent meeting.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry regarding regulations around backyard hens, Mr. Elgie reported that there has been a desire to consider accessory units holistically in the comprehensive zoning by-law and that is why this too has not moved forward.
By-law Enforcement Officer Allison Kreuger reported that before a regulatory by-law regarding backyard hens could be considered and passed by Council, the zoning by-law would need to be amended to address inclusion of backyard hens.
The following motion was proposed:
That staff be directed to review the current zoning by-law to consider amendments to permit backyard hens.
Carried

3.2.4 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry on the status of the IMPACT awards for local innovation and small business, CAO Clayton Harris reported that the Town of Parry Sound is one of 32 Founders in the Parry Sound Area and that the IMPACT awards will be presented by both Muskoka Founders Circle and Parry Sound Founders Circle on May 27th from 5:00 – 7:30 PM in a free admission virtual gala. With respect to the PS Impact Awards, five finalists will have gone through a Dragon’s Den style selection process with a prize of $10,000 and $5,000 awarded to the top two.

3.2.5 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry, Clerk Rebecca Johnson confirmed that the Near North District School Board representatives will be addressing Council at one of the two June Council meetings with respect to construction of the new high school. With respect to Councillor Backman’s query regarding traffic studies, Mr. Elgie reported that he and Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson met with school Board representatives last week and recommended a traffic study that not only looked at cars, but also at pedestrian traffic in the area.

3.2.6 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding statistics and process for determining pothole repair, Mr. Kearns reported that staff have been out as weather permits, patching small potholes with hotmix from recycled asphalt and that larger road cut sections will be scheduled soon for repair by an external contractor.

3.2.7 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the status of reinstallation of the railing at the Cascade St. hill, Mr. Kearns reported that he has been speaking with a local contractor who has agreed to meet on-site to review installation of the railing so as not to hinder winter maintenance. The meeting is pending.

Correspondence
4.1 – Anne Bossart, Tower Hill Gardeners Coordinator

Appreciation for work of Recreation Department staff for work at Tower Hill.

4.2 – Margaret Dunnigan, June Carlton, Louise Campbell, Cynthia Hamlin, Anita Chechock.
Individual letters of the same text supporting Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.
Filed.

4.3 – Maryann Weaver, Clerk, Township of the Archipelago.
Support for WPS Area Recreation and Culture Centre.
Filed.

4.4. – Ann & Dave Hurdman, Parry Sound residents.
Concerns with proposed amendment to the Parking & Traffic by-law under item 10.4.2 on the agenda which would charge for the overnight parking at boat launch.

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda
7.1 – Interpretation of Hiring Family Members Policy. Policy # C-1.2.

Resolution
That Council supports the staff interpretation of the Hiring of Family Members Policy (C- 1.2.)
And Further That Council directs staff to update the Policy and clarify under what circumstances it is acceptable to have family members working in the same department.
Carried

7.2 – Request to Appeal Planning Board Decision on B/06/2021 (TPS – Barnes).
Whereas the Council for the Town of Parry Sound recommended the denial of Parry Sound Area Planning Board Application B/06/2021 (TPS) – Barnes by Resolution 2021- 033;
And Whereas the Parry Sound Area Planning Board granted approval of B/06/2021 (TPS) – Barnes by Resolution 2021-31;
And Whereas Parry Sound Area Planning Board Resolution 2021-31 does not include a condition of consent that the lands be rezoned in order to ensure compliance with Town of Parry Sound Zoning By-law 2004-4653, as amended.
Now Therefore Be it Resolved that Council appeal the decision of Parry Sound Area Planning Board Application B/06/2021 (TPS) – Barnes to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) as the Parry Sound Area Planning Board’s decision will create an illegal non-complying lot per the Town’s Zoning By-law and does not represent good planning;
And Further That Council directs the Manager of Building and Planning Services to execute all necessary documents as it relates to the submission of this appeal unless the Planning Board’s Decision is amended to note a Zoning By-law Amendment is a condition of consent prior to the expiry of the appeal period.
Carried

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 Flag Policy – Inclusion of Pride Flag, and Amended Half-Masting Protocols.
Resolution
That the Flag Policy as adopted by Resolution 2020-076 is hereby revoked, and that the Flag Policy attached as Schedule A, which incorporates adoption of the annual flying of the Pride flag, and amended protocols regarding half-masting as a mark of respect and condolence is hereby approved.
Carried

9.1.2 – West Parry Sound Regional Economic Development Collaborative – Terms of Reference.
Resolution
WHEREAS the West Parry Sound Economic Development Collaborative (WPSEDC) is a partnership between the seven municipalities of West Parry Sound, originally created in 2018 with a mandate to improve the region’s business environment;
AND WHEREAS member municipalities approved the WPSEDC Terms of Reference in early 2018, which created a collaborative governance model involving a Board of Municipal Stakeholders, a Core Group of Advisors, a Steering Committee, and a Regional Economic Development Officer (EDO);
AND WHEREAS the Steering Committee and the Regional EDO are the only elements of this model that have been implemented to date;
AND WHEREAS FedNor approved funding for a period ending November 2023 to hire a Regional Economic Development Officer for a three (3) year term, with contributing funding coming from member municipalities;
AND WHEREAS all member municipalities passed resolutions of Council in October 2020 confirming their commitment to the WPSEDC;
AND WHEREAS the Steering Committee and the Regional EDO have recommended amendments to the WPSEDC Terms of Reference in order to reflect current operating procedures and economic development priorities;
AND WHEREAS the WPSEDC structure requires a Board of Stakeholder Municipalities, comprised of the Heads of Council (or designate) of the member municipalities, to provide high-level strategic direction to the WPSEDC;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Municipality adopts the updated WPSEDC Terms of Reference attached as Schedule A;
AND FURTHER that the Municipality hereby appoints ____________ to the Board of Stakeholder Municipalities.
The following appointing motion was made.
That the Resolution be amended to appoint Mayor McGarvey to the Committee, with Councillor Backman appointed as alternate in cases where the Mayor cannot attend.
Carried
The amended resolution was voted on.
Carried as amended

9.3.1 – Stormwater drainage easement – 1 Georgian Bay Avenue.
Resolution
Whereas the Town of Parry Sound has a stormwater conveyance over 1 Georgian Bay Ave; and
Whereas Parry Sound Condominium Corporation No. 6, owner of 1 Georgian Bay Ave. is in favour of granting an easement;
Now therefore the Mayor & Clerk are hereby authorized to sign the transfer documents to register the easement attached as Schedule A.
Carried

9.5.1 – Declaration of June 2021 as PTSD Awareness Month.
Resolution

Whereas June has been declared as PTSD Awareness Month each year around the world; and
Whereas for centuries we have recognized post traumatic stress disorder; and Whereas PTSD can affect all ages, children through to seniors: and
Whereas treatment for PTSD is available; and
Whereas it is up to each of us to know that the PTSD Assessment form is a major tool to seek medical assistance; and
Whereas PTSD Awareness Month urges all to seek help for those who may have PTSD requiring medical assistance;
NOW THEREFORE Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby proclaim June as PTSD Awareness month in the Town of Parry Sound, and encourages residents to actively learn about the PTSD Assessment form written by the Centre for PTSD Research as a tool to assist those affected by PTSD to obtain medical assistance.
Carried

By-laws 
10.2.1 – Debenture issue for Servicing Denis & Macklaim Drive.
By-law 2021 – 7128
A By-law of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound to Authorize the Borrowing Upon Amortizing Debentures in the Principal Amount of $750,424 towards the cost of servicing Macklaim/Denis.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.1 Amendment to the Sign By-law 2002-4486.
By-law 2021 – 7124
Being a By-law to amend the Sign By-law 2002-4486 regarding Sandwich Board Signs
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.2 – Amendment to Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912.
By-law 2021 – 7125
Being a By-law to amend the Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912 regarding Champagne St. Boat launch overnight parking and parking on Salt Dock Road.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.3 – New Public Dock and Boat Launch By-law for the Town of Parry Sound.
By-law 2021 – 7126
Being a By-law to regulate the use of Public Docks, Piers and Boat Launch Ramps and revoke By-law 2010-5470.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.4 – Sound Boat Works License of Occupation.
By-law 2021 – 7127
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a License of Occupation with Sound Boat Works for the use of the property identified Pt Water Lt C West of Mill St, Foley as in PS8343 Except Pt 11, 42R6597 & Pt 4, 42R11471; Parry Sound.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.5 – Zoning By-law Amendment Application Z/21/01 – Kingshott/Crookshank-Hurd.
By-Law 2021 – 7129
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 88 and 94 Louisa Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Kingshott/Crookshank- Hurd).
Passed, Signed and Sealed

Council Agenda Preview – May 4, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , ,

The agenda this week seems to be tidying up a number of outstanding issues. The only item that interested me was the proposal to require paid daily permits for overnight parking at the Champaigne Boat Launch (10.4.3). This by-law also addresses the issue of trailer parking and docking time at the various boat launches and the Town Dock. I am glad that we offer residents and visitors the opportunity to launch their boats and get onto Georgian Bay. Some control is necessary as some folks tend to abuse the privilege. I am not quite sure what By-Law has planned in terms of enforcement.

Abridged Agenda

Closed Session
d) labour relations or employee negotiations, (hiring policy interpretation);
(e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (Contractor work on Town property), (Planning Board decision);
f) advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose, (hiring policy interpretation), (Contractor work on Town property), (Planning Board decision).

Public Meeting
2.1 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/21-04 – 9 and 11 Church Street (FAD Architects on behalf of Gromov)

Council will hold a public meeting to consider a proposed Zoning By-law amendment under Section 34 of the Planning Act. The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change the zoning of the property from C1 on 11 Church Street and amend the S.P. 26.119(h) on 9 Church Street to permit a mixed-use building with a commercial ground floor and 20 residential spaces.

Correspondence
4.1 – Anne Bossart, Tower Hill Gardeners Coordinator.
Appreciation for work of Recreation Department staff for work at Tower Hill.

4.2 – Margaret Dunnigan, June Carlton, Louise Campbell, Cynthia Hamlin, Anita Chechock.
Individual letters of the same text supporting Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.

4.3 – Maryann Weaver, Clerk, Township of the Archipelago.
Support for WPS Area Recreation and Culture Centre.

Deputations
None

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Flag Policy – Inclusion of Pride Flag, and Amended Half-Masting Protocols.
Resolution

That the Flag Policy as adopted by Resolution 2020-076 is hereby revoked, and that the Flag Policy attached as Schedule A, which incorporates adoption of the annual flying of the Pride flag, and amended protocols regarding half-masting as a mark of respect and condolence is hereby approved.

9.3.1 – Stormwater drainage easement – 1 Georgian Bay Avenue.
Resolution

Whereas the Town of Parry Sound has a stormwater conveyance over 1 Georgian Bay; and
Whereas Parry Sound Condominium Corporation No. 6, owner of 1 Georgian Bay Ave. is in favour of granting an easement;
Now therefore the Mayor & Clerk are hereby authorized to sign the transfer documents to register the easement attached as Schedule A.

9.5.1 – Declaration of June 2021 as PTSD Awareness Month.
Resolution
Whereas, June has been declared as PTSD Awareness Month each year around the world; and
Whereas, for centuries we have recognized post traumatic stress disorder; and
Whereas, PTSD can affect all ages, children through to seniors: and
Whereas, treatment for PTSD is available; and
Whereas, it is up to each of us to know that the PTSD Assessment form is a major tool to seek medical assistance; and
Whereas, PTSD Awareness Month urges all to seek help for those who may have PTSD requiring medical assistance; and
NOW THEREFORE, Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby proclaim June as PTSD Awareness month in the Town of Parry Sound, and encourages residents to actively learn about the PTSD Assessment form written by the Centre for PTSD Research as a tool to assist those affected by PTSD to obtain medical assistance.

By-laws
10.2.1 – Debenture issue for Servicing Denis & Macklaim Drive.
By-law 2021 – 7128
A By-law of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound to Authorize the Borrowing Upon Amortizing Debentures in the Principal Amount of $750,424 towards the cost of servicing Macklaim/Denis.

10.4.1 – Amendment to the Sign By-law 2002-4486.
By-law 2021 – 7124
Being a By-law to amend the Sign By-law 2002-4486 regarding Sandwich Board Signs.

10.4.2 – Amendment to Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912.
By-law 2021 – 7125
Being a By-law to amend the Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912 regarding Champagne St. Boat launch overnight parking and parking on Salt Dock Road.

10.4.3 – New Public Dock and Boat Launch By-law for the Town of Parry Sound.
By-law 2021 – 7126
Being a By-law to regulate the use of Public Docks, Piers and Boat Launch Ramps and revoke By-law 2010-5470.

10.4.4 – Sound Boat Works License of Occupation.
By-law 2021 – 7127
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a License of Occupation with Sound Boat Works for the use of the property identified Pt Water Lt C West of Mill St Foley as in PS8343 Except Pt 11, 42R6597 & Pt 4, 42R11471; Parry Sound.

10.4.5 – Zoning By-law Amendment Application Z/21/01 – Kingshott/Crookshank-Hurd.
By-Law 2021 – 7129
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 88 and 94 Louisa Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Kingshott/Crookshank- Hurd).

Council Minutes (Abridged) – April 20, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

There were a large number of items brought before Council as letters, deputations, resolutions and by-laws. It’s worth scanning through the abridged minutes below to understand what was asked and what was decided. None of it was controversial in my opinion.

5.2 – David Sweetnam, Georgian Bay Forever; Rupert Kindersley, Georgian Bay Assn. Results of Water Levels Web Symposium, October, 2020.
The deputation summary is worth reviewing below if you want to get a better idea of where the experts think water levels are headed. Spoiler – it’s up, up and away.

Council Minutes (Abridged)

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest
1.4.1 –
Councillor Horne Declared Pecuniary Interest on item 9.5.1 being the resolution proclaiming May as Community Living Month in Parry Sound, as Community Living Parry Sound is his employer. Councillor Horne left the meeting for the duration of the item, did not participate in discussion, nor vote on the matter.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the potential for installation of a security camera at the skateboard park to deal with vandalism, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that while there is currently no such plan for that location, he would investigate further on potential for installation of security cameras and/or lights as a means of addressing the problem.
Mayor McGarvey obtained Council’s approval to direct Mr. Kearns to get costing for this proposal.

3.2.2 – Mr. Kearns responded to Councillor Keith’s inquiry confirming that the Recreation Department puts together an annual maintenance plan and that with the early spring, they expect to be ahead of schedule. Mr. Kearns also noted that while the Champaign St and Waubuno Beach boat launches are open the Salt Dock ramp sustained damage and it will take longer to determine what work needs to be done and how to do it, as the damaged area is in the water.

3.2.3 – Mr. Kearns also responded to Councillor Keith that with respect to staffing, the vacancy in Public Works will be filled shortly, and summer student positions are still in the budget projections although given recent renewed COVID restrictions, hiring has not yet proceeded. CAO Clayton Harris added that summer student hiring at the Stockey Centre is reduced due to lockdown and reduced hours.

3.2.4 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry, Mayor McGarvey reported that more information is flowing from the Board of Health which he passes on to WPS Area heads of Council, and that there is good attendance at the bi-weekly municipal meetings. Unfortunately, the Board of Health has still declined to report statistics broken down between the east and west sides of the District.

3.2.5 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding assurance that any increases in infrastructure construction costs as a result of supply chain interruptions caused by COVID are reviewed by staff and included in the budget, CAO Clayton Harris reported that generally projects are tendered or go out through an RFP process to get the lowest responsible bid for a job. If the lowest qualified bidder is higher than the budget, staff can consider either scoping back on the work envisioned, or if not possible, come back to Council to request approval for additional funding.

Correspondence
4.1 – Resolutions of Support to prioritize Vaccine Allocation for areas in Phase I.

Lori West, Clerk/Planner, Municipality of McDougall Judith Meyntz, Deputy Clerk, Municipality of Whitestone Jenn Montreuil, Deputy City Clerk, City of North Bay Beth Morton, Clerk-Administrator, Township of Perry Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling Andrea Spinney, Deputy Clerk, Township of Seguin Caitlin Haggart, Clerk-Administrator, Township of Strong
Filed

4.2 – Vic Fedeli, MPP.
Response to Vaccine Prioritization Request received from City of North Bay.
Filed

4.3 – Andrea Spinney, Deputy Clerk, Township of Seguin.
Support for appointment of Jamie McGarvey to the Board of Health.
Filed

4.4 – Joanne Demick, Executive Director, Community Living Parry Sound.
Request for Proclamation of May as Community Living Month .
Under flag policy, administrative approval given to the flag flying request; proclamation covered by item 9.5.1.

4.5 – Julie Chiaramonte, Kerri Mutrie, Patricia Hume, Andrea McIntyre, Pat Mastrocola, Barbara Morgan, George & Alice Reed, Susan Beal, Carol Rice, Michael Walton, Susan Ferguson, Gloria Koslowski, Steven Smith.
Individual letters of the same text supporting Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.
Filed

4.6 – Simon Fecteau, Director of Education, Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario.
Request for support letter for capital funding submission to Ministry of Education to acquire or build the French school Quatre-Vents.
Covered by item 9.5.2

Deputations
5.1 – Greg Mason, General Manager, Georgian Bay Biosphere.

Community Nominated Priority Places Project.
Greg Mason addressed Council from a prepared presentation, as circulated with the Agenda. Mr. Mason noted that the Community Nominated Priority Places Project is a program that has been running for two years and is set to run for another two, in cooperation with a number of municipalities and organizations along the Georgian Bay coast. The program is funded over 4 years through $2 million federally with matching $2 million raised through other organizations.
Mr. Mason noted the main goals of the program are: to accelerate knowledge generation and collective decision-making for Species at Risk; and to work together for priority ecosystems for biodiversity protection, habitat connectivity, and greater resilience.
Co-applicants in addition to GBB, are Magnetawan First Nation, Shawanaga First Nation and Georgian Bay Land Trust, with upwards of 30 additional partners to the project. The project is overseen by a Steering and Lands Committee composed of the co-applicants, and incorporates traditional ecological knowledge, and truth and reconciliation training. At a core the project seeks to provide adequate information on the locations where there is the greatest threat to species at risk, to prioritize resources to specific regions, as opposed to broad-brush support.
Mr. Mason gave an example of a road ecology project in 2020 whereby turtle nests were removed prior to road work, and the eggs incubated over the summer with about 1000 turtles later released. This was both a successful conservation effort, and cost effective for the municipality, as it did not have to put up permanent fencing estimated at $30,000 to $40,000.
Other means of gathering data to support effective decision making include the app that can be downloaded for people to submit their species observations; and the seven MOTUS Telemetry Arrays installed on the coast to monitor bird, bat and other avian species.
Mr. Mason concluded with notice of opportunities for municipal engagement including road management and ecology approaches; planning policy and process review; education outreach; and cultural and cross-government learning.

5.2 – David Sweetnam, Georgian Bay Forever; Rupert Kindersley, Georgian Bay Assn.
Results of Water Levels Web Symposium, October, 2020.
David Sweetnam and Rupert Kindersley, Executive Directors of Georgian Bay Forever and Georgian Bay Association respectively, addressed Council from a prepared presentation as circulated with the Agenda regarding results of Great Lakes Water Levels Web Symposium held in October 2020.
Key take-aways from the 2020 Symposium include the following:
1. Current management of the Great Lakes system is not deficient, including Plan 2012 which had seen Lake Superior as relatively higher than Lakes Michigan-Huron and had generally attempted to increase flows, though barely and with variability. Since April 2018 the balancing factor has been trying to decrease flows from Lake Superior to Lakes Michigan-Huron. The historic range of water level fluctuations on Lake Michigan- Huron (M-H) is so much higher than the range on Lake Superior (LS) since LS is 39.1% of the surface area of its watershed, whereas M-H is only 31.8% of the surface area of its watershed. M-H watershed is 197% the size of LS watershed. Additionally, M-H receives all upstream inputs from Lake Superior.
2. The solution to extreme water levels does not lie with improved management of the current system.
3. International Joint Commission has no power itself to implement any action.
4. Release of a key research study by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) which identifies that the components method and residuals method used to calculate net basin supply are not “in conflict” – they are measurements used for different purposes and are accurate given current tools available. The Large Lake Statistical Water Balance Model (LLSWBM) reconciles discrepancies between components and residuals methods.
5. Action on specific improvements to the quality and content of water levels data and modelling.
6. Revisit the formation of a Great Lakes Water Levels Advisory body.
With respect to what municipal governments should consider and do, Messrs. Sweetnam and Kindersley advised that:
– it is expected that extreme high water levels could be as much 3 feet higher than the last extreme high by the year 2100, gradually increasing over the next 80 years; and conversely extreme low water levels are only expected to be lower by around 4 inches.
– Wave action, run-up, pluvial and fluvial flooding must be considered.
– Therefore, given the uncertainty for planning purposes, consider raising the high-water mark accordingly to 178.4 meters (585 feet) above sea level, or plan to increase it in increments.
– When making investment decisions on docks, coastal roads/infrastructure, boat launches etc. plan for this expanded range of water levels.
– Primary issue will be ensuring environmental protection at residences – setbacks only effective if high water level is correct.
– The highest impact will be on: septic systems, docks, boat houses and low elevation shoreline structures.

5.3 – Lee-Ann Turner
Request for Town’s Permanent Endorsement to fly Pride Flag annually.
Lee-Ann Turner thanked Council for its approval to fly the Pride Flag for the month of June last year and requested that this year and every year thereafter Parry Sound purchase and fly the Pride during the month of June without requirement for an annual request.
Ms. Turner gave a brief outline of the Pride movement, noted that federally, provincially, and in many municipalities in Ontario, June is dedicated to Pride month as a matter of corporate cultural policy. Ms. Turner suggested that Parry Sound’s commitment to annually flying the flag would send a positive message about the community and so concluded with the request that Town Council commit to June every year as Pride month, purchase the Pride flag and fly it during that month.
Mayor McGarvey obtained Council agreement to have something brought to the next Council meeting to address this.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan. Resolution

That Council approve the progress report on the Town’s Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.
Carried

9.1.2 – Sail Parry Sound Funding Request for the Rotary Sunset Trail.
Resolution
WHEREAS the Town has received a request from Sail Parry Sound for $20,000 for the remediation of the erosion on the Rotary Sunset Trail;
WHEREAS the Rotary Sunset Trail is on the lands leased from the Town by Sail Parry Sound;
WHEREAS the Town of Parry Sound leases the property to Sail Parry Sound for a nominal amount and Sail Parry Sound does not pay property taxes on the leased land;
WHEREAS the lease agreement states that Sail Parry Sound is responsible for the maintenance and repairs of the property;
WHEREAS there is a concern that a reconstruction of the trail, rather than remediation is required, involving proper engineering design and construction to complete a safe and lasting trail at a cost greater than the $20,000 estimate provided;
WHEREAS the scope of work has not been clearly defined;
Whereas it is unclear if there are other funding partners, such as Sail Parry Sound, the Rotary Club, etc.; and
WHEREAS the Town has an interest in supporting some reconstruction of the trail, subject to a detailed proposal being provided.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that Council requests that Sail Parry Sound submit a proposal setting out the work to be done, identify funding from all sources and indicate their intention at the end of the current lease; and further
THAT Council approves the reallocation of up to $20,000 of unassigned funds from the Federal Gas Tax Reserve Fund to the Rotary Sunset Trail rehabilitation; and further
THAT the actual amount of funds to be committed to the project will be subject to the receipt of the above information to the satisfaction of Council.
Carried

9.1.3 – Additional funding for external resources to support and move the recreation and culture centre project forward.
Resolution

Whereas the Optimist Club donated $40,000 to the Town of Parry Sound in 1994 for use towards a recreation centre;
Whereas the Town is the lead applicant in a joint ICIP application on behalf of 7 municipalities and 2 First Nation communities for a recreation and culture centre;

Whereas the timing to address questions/concerns raised during the process and to confirm the support of all partners is critical;
Whereas there is a need to engage external resources in the process;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that Council authorizes staff to utilize the funds donated by the Optimist Club for the purposes of retaining external resources in support of the recreation and culture project.
Carried
CAO Clayton Harris confirmed in response to an inquiry that the current Optimist Club Executive can be contacted to advise them that the money from the 1994 donation is being allocated and spent for its intended purpose.

9.2.1 – 2020 Financial Year End Audit Planning Report.
BDO Engagement Partner and Michelle Yin addressed Council from a prepared presentation that was circulated with the Council agenda. Ms. Bodkin provided an executive summary identifying issues of
materiality (i.e., based on revenues of $690,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020);
timeline (most work to be done in May 2021 with a report back to Council);
fees ($31,500);
and audit risks in the areas of management override of controls,
revenue recognition (i.e., fraud risk),
purchases cut-off (i.e. items after year end and assurance that payables are accrued),
contaminated sites,
and contributed infrastructure assets.
Ms. Bodkin asked if Council was aware of any fraud or had concerns they wanted brought up to the auditor. If any, Ms. Bodkin said that information might change the audit approach, i.e., extra testing in that area. No member of Council brought forward any concern.
Resolution
That Council receive the Auditor’s 2020 Financial Year End Audit Planning Report as presented by Giselle Bodkin, BDO Engagement Partner.
Carried

9.3.1 – 2020 Annual Report – Closure Monitoring Program MacFarlane St. Landfill Site.
Resolution

That Council receive the 2020 Annual Report – Closure Monitoring Program MacFarlane St. Landfill Site for information purposes.
Carried

9.4.1 – Consent Application – B12/2021 (TPS) (Halvorson)
Resolution

That Consent Application No. B12/2021 (TPS) (Halvorson), be supported.
Carried

9.4.2 – Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/20/02 – Oastler Park Dive (John Jackson Planner Inc. on Behalf of Waltmar Inc.).
Resolution
That a decision on Z/20/02 – Oastler Park Dive (John Jackson Planner Inc. on Behalf of Waltmar Inc.) be deferred as it is premature.
Carried

9.5.1 – Declaration of May, 2021 as Community Living Month in Parry Sound.
Resolution
WHEREAS Community Living Parry Sound has worked to bring people and their communities together for over 58 years; and
WHEREAS Community Living Parry Sound supports people as they develop their capacity to live, learn, work and participate in all aspects of living in the community; and
WHEREAS Community Living Parry Sound helps the community develop its capacity to welcome and support people who have not always had the same opportunities as the rest of us, to participate in their community in meaningful, productive ways; and
WHEREAS the Council of the Town of Parry Sound wishes to urge its citizens to celebrate the inclusion in our community of people who have a developmental disability.
NOW, Therefore Be It Resolved that Mayor and Council declare the month of May Community Living Month in the Town of Parry Sound.
Carried

9.5.2 – Letter of Support for Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario.
Resolution

THAT Council authorizes the Mayor to sign a letter of support for the Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario with respect to its capital funding submission to the Ministry of Education to acquire or build a school for Quatre-Vents in Parry Sound.
Carried
CAO Clayton Harris confirmed in response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry, that the School Board rep could be invited to address Council in a meeting to provide an update on the High School reconstruction status.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Lease Agreement with The Festival of the Sound for use of the Stockey Centre.

By-law 2021 – 7122
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a five-year renewal agreement with the Festival of the Sound for lease of the Charles W. Stockey Centre.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.2.1 – 2021 Budget.
By-law 2021 – 7119
Being a By-law to Adopt the Operating and Capital Budget Estimated for the Year 2021.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.1 – License of Occupation Parry Sound Cruise Line.
By-law 2021 – 7120
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a License of Occupation with Parry Sound Cruise Line for the use of the dock at LT 6-21 PL 154; PARRY SOUND.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.2 – Chantler Barging Lease.
By-law 2021 – 7121
Being a By-law to authorize the execution a Lease with Chantler Barging Ltd for the use of the property identified as Lot 2 Plan 155 being Part on Plan 42R9587, Lot 3 Plan 166, Lot 4 Plan 166 all in the Town of Parry Sound.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

Council Agenda Preview – April 20, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Another packed session. I will only comment on item 9.5.2.

9.5.2 – Letter of Support for Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario.
Resolution

THAT Council authorizes the Mayor to sign a letter of support for the Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario with respect to its capital funding submission to the Ministry of Education to acquire or build a school for Quatre-Vents in Parry Sound.
While I am happy to see this educational resource made available I regret that perhaps another piece of prime Town of Parry Sound real estate will not be available for tax generating private development. We seem to be the town of social services, churches and schools. Why not look to McDougall for the new school’s location? It’s just up the road and they will be losing their school. This is another example of why we need amalgamation. If not, then give the Town a little more room to grow and generate more income through development. The hesitancy, I was wondering when it would bubble up, to ‘Da Pool’ is the reality we are facing. Our neighbours want the resources but don’t want to pay for it.

Enough opining on local issues. Work deadlines are looming and my fingers need the rest.

Council Agenda (Abridged)

Closed Session
No Items

Correspondence
4.1 – Resolutions of Support to prioritize Vaccine Allocation for areas in Phase I
.
Lori West, Clerk/Planner, Municipality of McDougall Judith Meyntz, Deputy Clerk, Municipality of Whitestone Jenn Montreuil, Deputy City Clerk, City of North Bay Beth Morton, Clerk-Administrator, Township of Perry Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling Andrea Spinney, Deputy Clerk, Township of Seguin

4.2 – Vic Fedeli, MPP.
Response to Vaccine Prioritization Request.

4.3 – Andrea Spinney, Deputy Clerk, Township of Seguin.
Support for appointment of Jamie McGarvey to the Board of Health.

4.4 – Joanne Demick, Executive Director, Community Living Parry Sound.
Request for Proclamation of May as Community Living Month.

4.5 – Julie Chiaramonte, Kerri Mutrie, Patricia Hume, Andrea McIntyre, Pat Mastrocola, Barbara Morgan, George & Alice Reed, Susan Beal, Carol Rice, Michael Walton, Susan Ferguson, Gloria Koslowski, Steven Smith.
Individual letters of the same text supporting Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.

4.6 – Simon Fecteau, Director of Education, Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario.
Request for support letter for capital funding submission to Ministry of Education.

Deputations
5.1 – Greg Mason, General Manager, Georgian Bay Biosphere.

Community Nominated Priority Places Project; presentation attached.

5.2 – David Sweetnam, Georgian Bay Forever; Rupert Kindersley, Georgian Bay Assn.
Results of Water Levels Web Symposium, October, 2020; presentation attached.

5.3 – Lee-Ann Turner.
Request for Town’s Permanent Endorsement to fly Pride Flag annually during June; request and letters of support attached.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
Resolution
That Council approve the progress report on the Town’s Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.

9.1.2 – Sail Parry Sound Funding Request for the Rotary Sunset Trail.
Resolution

WHEREAS the Town has received a request from Sail Parry Sound for $20,000 for the remediation of the erosion on the Rotary Sunset Trail;
WHEREAS the Rotary Sunset Trail is on the lands leased from the Town by Sail Parry Sound;
WHEREAS the Town of Parry Sound leases the property to Sail Parry Sound for a nominal amount and Sail Parry Sound does not pay property taxes on the leased land;
WHEREAS the lease agreement states that Sail Parry Sound is responsible for the maintenance and repairs of the property;
WHEREAS there is a concern that a reconstruction of the trail, rather than remediation is required, involving proper engineering design and construction to complete a safe and lasting trail at a cost greater than the $20,000 estimate provided;
WHEREAS the scope of work has not been clearly defined; Whereas it is unclear if there are other funding partners, such as Sail Parry Sound, the Rotary Club, etc.; and
WHEREAS the Town has an interest in supporting some reconstruction of the trail, subject to a detailed proposal being provided.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that Council requests that Sail Parry Sound submit a proposal setting out the work to be done, identify funding from all sources and indicate their intention at the end of the current lease; and further
THAT Council approves the reallocation of up to $20,000 of unassigned funds from the Federal Gas Tax Reserve Fund to the Rotary Sunset Trail rehabilitation; and further
THAT the actual amount of funds to be committed to the project will be subject to the receipt of the above information to the satisfaction of Council.

9.1.3 – Additional funding for external resources to support and move the recreation and culture centre project forward.
Resolution

Whereas the Optimist Club donated $40,000 to the Town of Parry Sound in 1994 for use towards a recreation centre;
Whereas the Town is the lead applicant in a joint ICIP application on behalf of 7 municipalities and 2 First Nation communities for a recreation and culture centre;
Whereas the timing to address questions/concerns raised during the process and to confirm the support of all partners is critical;
Whereas there is a need to engage external resources in the process;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that Council authorizes staff to utilize the funds donated by the Optimist Club for the purposes of retaining external resources in support of the recreation and culture project.

9.2.1 – 2020 Financial Year End Audit Planning Report.
Resolution

That Council receive the Auditor’s 2020 Financial Year End Audit Planning Report as presented by Giselle Bodkin, BDO Engagement Partner.

9.3.1 – 2020 Annual Report – Closure Monitoring Program MacFarlane St. Landfill Site.
Resolution

That Council receive the 2020 Annual Report – Closure Monitoring Program MacFarlane St. Landfill Site for information purposes.

9.4.1 – Consent Application – B12/2021 (TPS) (Halvorson).
Resolution

That Consent Application No. B12/2021 (TPS) (Halvorson), be supported.

9.4.2 – Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/20/02 – Oastler Park Dive (John Jackson Planner Inc. on Behalf of Waltmar Inc.).
Resolution

That a decision on Z/20/02 – Oastler Park Dive (John Jackson Planner Inc. on Behalf of Waltmar Inc.) be deferred as it is premature.

9.5.1 – Declaration of May, 2021 as Community Living Month in Parry Sound.
Resolution

WHEREAS Community Living Parry Sound has worked to bring people and their communities together for over 58 years; and
WHEREAS Community Living Parry Sound supports people as they develop their capacity to live, learn, work and participate in all aspects of living in the community; and
WHEREAS Community Living Parry Sound helps the community develop its capacity to welcome and support people who have not always had the same opportunities as the rest of us, to participate in their community in meaningful, productive ways; and
WHEREAS the Council of the Town of Parry Sound wishes to urge its citizens to celebrate the inclusion in our community of people who have a developmental disability.
NOW, Therefore Be It Resolved that Mayor and Council declare the month of May Community Living Month in the Town of Parry Sound.

9.5.2 – Letter of Support for Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario.
Resolution

THAT Council authorizes the Mayor to sign a letter of support for the Conseil scolaire public du Nord-Est de l’Ontario with respect to its capital funding submission to the Ministry of Education to acquire or build a school for Quatre-Vents in Parry Sound.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Lease Agreement with The Festival of the Sound for use of the Stockey Centre.

By-law 2021 – 7122
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a five-year renewal agreement with the Festival of the Sound for lease of the Charles W. Stockey Centre.

10.2.1 – 2021 Budget.
By-law 2021 – 7119
Being a By-law to Adopt the Operating and Capital Budget Estimated for the Year 2021.

10.4.1 – License of Occupation Parry Sound Cruise Line.
By-law 2021 – 7120
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a License of Occupation with Parry Sound Cruise Line for the use of the dock at LT 6-21 PL 154; PARRY SOUND.

10.4.2 – Chantler Barging Lease.
By-law 2021 – 7121
Being a By-law to authorize the execution a Lease with Chantler Barging Ltd for the use of the property identified as Lot 2 Plan 155 being Part on Plan 42R9587, Lot 3 Plan 166, Lot 4 Plan 166 all in the Town of Parry Sound

Apology Time?

Tags

, , ,

No this doesn’t concern any of the topics I have recently commented on. I have already offered an apology for using the term “bitching and moaning” at a board meeting, and I don’t think Andrew will be getting any type of thank you, much less an apology.

The apology I am suggesting should be offered to Dr. Jim Chirico the Medical Officer of Health for the North Bay Parry Sound Health Unit. The people who should seriously consider apologizing are our local politicians and some of our local business leaders.

I have been quiet about the whole COVID-19 situation, but I have been following it closely, more as part of my professional activities than as a spectator sport. For fun I prefer to watch American politics. Anyone else miss Donald Trump? Watching him operate was like watching a 5-year-old trying to land a Boeing 747. Lots of confidence but no experience or natural ability to succeed. I am actually getting quite a bit more work done now that he is not coming up with his entertaining daily demonstrations of narcissism.

Have you looked at our COVID-19 infection and death figures relative to the other districts and municipalities? Do you remember when Dr. Chirico imposed certain restrictions when he first saw evidence of COVID-19 variants in our district? There was a howl from businesses and the public that resonated with the politicians who demanded he meet with them weekly to discuss the situation and explain his decisions. How about we have a similar forum where the politicians meet with the public on a weekly basis to answer our questions and criticisms? Yes, we have deputations, but all the politicians have to do is listen and then conclude the presentation with a simple mention that they will take the input under consideration. What if they or staff had to answer on the spot or provide a written response within a week? I am sure they would feel that this was an unreasonable questioning of their authority.

But when it comes to public health, everyone, and that includes politicians, public, and businesses, is willing to question the medical professionals from the perspective of what they have read online and their friends have posted on Facebook.

Perhaps an apology is too much to ask, a simple thank you would be appropriate. It’s no fun putting restrictions in place. It’s so much easier to let the kids play video games and watch YouTube rather than convince or coerce them into doing their homework. But like a responsible medical officer or parent you have to provide leadership with longer term considerations in mind. Short term pain is often required for long term gain.

Disclosure: I am still annoyed by the response of the Town of Parry Sound Council when it came to the fluoridation issue and their lack of leadership. I am sure that if you put COVID-19 restrictions to a vote we would have no restrictions. Voting on public health issues is not in the best interests of the community but it keeps voters happy and supporting the politicians when election time rolls around. Better to trust the professionals.

Savoir Faire

Tags

, ,

Let me wade into the discussion that was raised by a recent article in the North Star (ParrySound.com) concerning changes made at the Park-to-Park Trail (P2P) board of directors. I may have a useful perspective. I served on the board for a couple of years and continue to volunteer with the organization as webmaster for their website (parktoparktrail.org). I have also attended a few board meetings since I left about five years ago. As recently as a year ago I was involved with the P2P strategic plan.

Changes at the P2P Board Level
There is no question that changes were required at the board level. As was noted in the article there was a lack of direction and focus that required improvement. Whether this came through ‘shaking up the board’ or more fundamental help from the municipalities, it is not clear. Too often the thought is to fire the coach or the general manager when the team isn’t winning or at least meeting expectations. How has that worked for you Leaf fans? Sometimes the problem is with ownership.

An issue with the board certainly was alpha male syndrome. Skills that are valuable in one area of business or life don’t necessarily translate to board oversight. A related issue was the use of experience in the ‘field’ to push forward and support pet initiatives. Years of experience and a loud voice too often drowned out other ideas. It was not particularly overt, but it had an impact.

About Andrew Ryland
I have worked with Andrew on a couple of boards, P2P and the Parry Sound Area Chamber of Commerce. We see each other occasionally at one of the grocery stores but do not socialize.

I would suggest that if changes were required on the P2P board that Andrew would have been one of the very last people I would have suggested be asked to leave. He has a wealth of business experience and a certain ‘savoir faire’ that is very useful in business and on the board. We worked together, along with other board members, on the turnaround of the Chamber when it hit financial difficulty. Yes, he was part of the board as the Chamber wandered into problems, and he was also part of the solution. Andrew has the type of ‘smarts’ you want and need on a board.

The Need for Savoir Faire
The term savoir faire is defined as “capacity for appropriate action; especially: a polished sureness in social behavior”. This is something I am not seeing much of from some municipalities. This is evidenced in this situation by the treatment that Andrew received in what seemed to be a hostile takeover, if not a coup. He suggested that a tap on the shoulder and a few words would have been enough to let him exit the organization appropriately with a relationship that would have allowed P2P to reach out to him for advice and help if necessary. Knowing Andrew, there is no question in my mind that he would have respected the heads up and done the right thing. I am not convinced that would have been the right solution, but perhaps it would have been done the right way.

There is expediency and there is common decency. I hope that people are learning the lessons. It will be hard to recruit board members and volunteers if they are poorly treated.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – April 6, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wow – this was a packed session and ended at 10:00. I feel that there were some considerate decisions made with respect to the 2021 budget. The rezoning of property on George Street / Tower Hill brought out the expected comments and concerns. You may want to read the comments to get a sense of sentiments. My feeling as someone who interacts regularly with the folks is at the Museum and the Tower Hill Heritage Garden is that the development will not negatively impact either of them. We have a problem in Town, and it is housing, particularly affordable (not necessarily subsidized) housing. The tradespeople and professionals we desperately need would be happy to move into the area and enjoy the many amenities if there was suitable housing. I am not sure the Town can afford to let land stand idle because the neighbours won’t like the ‘traffic’.

I am happy to see that the issue of erosion on the waterfront, both the Sunset Trail and the bridge to Silbow Point at Waubuno Beach is getting the necessary attention, if not yet the budget. It is better in my opinion to have a plan before budgeting and spending money.

The is a bit of a change in format with the abridged minutes presented below. I will start to apply Bold and Underline to the topics listed. This may make it easier to wade through the minutes and pay attention to items that are of particular interest. As always, refer to the official minutes package at the Town of Parry Sound’s website if you want the unabridged minutes.

Meeting Minutes (Abridged)

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, (Taxi License Appeal Hearing); 

Public Meeting
2.1 – Z/21-02 – George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Ravi Prasher).
After the Mayor adjourned the regular meeting and declared the public meeting open, Clerk Rebecca Johnson advised that notice had been given by prepaid first-class mail to the required prescribed agencies and property owners within 120 metres, posted on the property and placed on the Town’s website.
Manager of Building and Planning Services Taylor Elgie advised that the purpose of the first proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change the zoning of the property from Residential Medium Density (R2) to Residential High Density (R3). The effect of the proposed Zoning By-Law amendment is to allow for creation of a 36-unit apartment building.
John Jackson, agent for applicant Ravi Prasher, responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment.
Mr. Jackson reported that the application was filed with a number of supporting components, pre-consultation was undertaken with staff, and the following reports were prepared: a planning justification report, environmental report, traffic impact report, noise impact study and a preliminary engineering report. Mr. Jackson said he believed the proposal is in conformity with policies of the Official Plan, and that creation of housing is supported in the Provincial Policy Statement, and in the growth plan for Northern Ontario. Mr. Jackson said it was his belief that many concerns expressed by neighbours would be addressed through a more detailed site plan process, and that screening could alleviate privacy concerns. Mr. Jackson acknowledged that sight lines from George to Forest Street are not good, but that this problem is being addressed in the engineering report. Mr. Jackson concluded with the suggestion that the proposal will help respond to what we know is a housing crisis both in Town and throughout the province and country.

The following members of the public responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment:
Sarah Priaulx of 53 Forest Street addressed Council with the following questions and concerns: development is in her backyard bordering her fence line, effects of blasting beside foundation, location of sewer and water lines and who pays for this, potential increase in taxes for this development, increased density impacts on safety, liability as a result of location beside trestle, treacherous turning from George Street onto Forest Street, traffic study done in February when it should be done in July when population is high. Ms. Priaulx said she had a number of questions which she would address with staff.
France Beaulieu of Forest Street addressed Council with the following questions and concerns: environmental feasibility in a nice wooded area, opposed to the building going up, concerns with traffic study and questioning when it was undertaken, questioning if the Town is contributing money towards water and sewer; concerned about population in backyard; will fence be put up, will there be too much light on at night in the parking lot; will the developer receive grant money from municipal sources to build; is there money available if neighbours want to consult with a lawyer; what happens if building foundations are damaged due to blasting; will a fence be provided to help with privacy; Ms. Beaulieu also expressed concerns that during winter, Forest Street will become more busy as a means of getting in and out of the development since the George Street hill becomes slippery, and this increased traffic will cause an accident. She also expressed concerns with potential increased population density and overcrowding in this area.
Mr. Elgie advised that he had received the following items of correspondence expressing concerns or in opposition to the proposed zoning by-law amendment:
Ken Webb, George Street – ok with density but height is too much overall degrading the intrinsic value of Tower Hill and Museum; 36-unit building does not celebrate the 100-year anniversary of Tower Hill well; safety concerns with the entrance on to Forrest Street.
David Juffs – concern with drainage and trespass problems of the roadway area; wants roadway and offsite storm water considered as part of any approval; concerns with the entrance between Forest and George Streets and suggests a 3-way stop may be advisable; opposes rezoning to R3.
Ray & Roxanne Priaulx – question the number of stories, and whether it is subsidized housing; concern with intersection of George and Forest Streets and Parry Sound Road; question the impact on wildlife, stormwater and traffic, and resulting wear and tear on other roads such as Parry Sound Road.
Chris & Angela Clark – concern with the intersection; safety will become a greater issue with this proposal; concern with the quality of George Street and lack of sidewalks; property is unsafe due to proximity to train tracks and soil quality due to previous oil tank storage; this will negatively impact the Museum and Tower Hill.
James Bisson & Brenda Regan – concern that location too close to back yard; lighting from parking lot; number of vehicles going in and out, impeding upon privacy; traffic and intersection concerns; Forest Street currently has no sidewalks and is quite rough; noise, mess, and disruption will affect privacy and blasting will affect wildlife.
Dan Connaghan – as he is looking after elderly family, concern that this proposal will bring risk of COVID-19 closer to his property through portable toilets and imported workers; traffic concerns at the intersection; question whether adequate water and sewer capacity, concerns about wildlife, noise, and visitors trespassing on his property.
Reg Goslett – concern with intersection and feels a 3-way stop is necessary; agrees with applicant report that George Street needs to be repaved, upgraded, and widened and wishes for this to be extended to the Museum.
Lee Smith – concern with traffic and intersection; soil should be tested due to previous presence of oil tanks; due to vegetation removal, storm water may be an issue; improvements to be at cost of developer not taxpayer.
Dean Timson & Margo Houston – concern about negative effect on peace and quiet for themselves and adjacent property owners; adding 100 people on half a hectare of property is poor planning; zoning should be down zoned for less development. Forest Street was poorly designed and repaved years ago; intersection with George Street is dangerous; adjacent rail line is dangerous; application is misleading as shows different information on different spots
Canadian Pacific – comments provided in an extensive technical document.
Sarah Priaulx – concern regarding easement, foundation, blasting, who pays for improvements on road, timing and year when traffic study undertaken. George St & Forest St intersection is dangerous; questions whether railway contacted; sights drainage as a problem; safety concerns with rail line as sparks have caused small brush fires; high density doesn’t fit criteria for this location; backfilling will flood neighbouring properties. OPP is there frequently as it is not a safe area with needles found and having more people will be troublesome.

After Mr. Elgie concluded his summary of comments received in opposition, the Mayor advised that Council, at its discretion may approve the proposed Zoning By-law amendment and if so, must either circulate notice of passing of the by-law or give notice in the local press. Objections to the passing of the by-law will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal. If an appeal is submitted and the appellant has not provided Council with an oral or written submission before the passing of the by-law, the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal may choose to dismiss the appeal.

2.2 Z/21-01 – Louisa Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Kingshott and Hurd).
Clerk Rebecca Johnson advised that notice had been given by prepaid first-class mail to the required prescribed agencies and property owners within 120 metres, posted on the property and placed on the Town’s website.
Mr. Elgie advised that the second proposed Zoning By-law amendment would amend the S.P. 26.72 Zone to a Rural Residential zone and recognize a reduced lot frontage of 34 metres for two provisionally created lots along Louisa Street, and that a rezoning was a condition of consent for related application B/37A/37B/2020 (TPS).
John Jackson responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment, noting that the application is straight forward and satisfies a technical issue.
No one spoke in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment. Mr. Elgie advised that he had received no correspondence with regards to this matter.

The Mayor advised that Council, at its discretion may approve the proposed Zoning By- law amendment and if so, must either circulate notice of passing of the by-law or give notice in the local press. Objections to the passing of the by-law will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal. If an appeal is submitted and the appellant has not provided Council with an oral or written submission before the passing of the by-law, the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal may choose to dismiss the appeal.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding street sweeping plans, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that this year street sweeping was able to commence a little earlier than usual. Sidewalk sweepers are not collectors – they simply move material out off the sidewalk and where possible, out into the street for the street sweeper to collect and transport to the Public Works Yard.
3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding movement of salt at the Salt Dock, Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson reported that according to the agreement with the Salt Company, a certain area of the Salt Dock must be clear of salt for public use during the summer, and the Salt Company is therefore currently using heavy equipment to move salt on site to a smaller surface area of the Salt Dock.
3.2.3 – Cllr Borneman reported that he wished to pass on to the Mayor concerns from seniors about the trouble they have had booking vaccinations – waiting for hours on the phone and being sent to vaccination centres outside the area. Mayor McGarvey responded that he has heard the same thing and would raise this issue with the Board of Health in an attempt to improve the roll-out with more clinics locally and the booking process made easier.
3.2.4 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding fire fighter training and recruitment Chief Dave Thompson reported that the Parry Sound Fire Department, along with Carling, McDougall and McKellar were given a great opportunity to use the Friendship Centre for a two-day training exercise, which offered experience with a large building, forcible entry, and other technical exercises. Chief Thompson also reported that the Fire Department does need members in Town, but that COVID-19 regulations have delayed recruitment efforts for a women’s information session and a general information session until May, when face to face meetings might resume again.

Correspondence
4.1 – Steve Barnes, applicant for Hillcrest Ave. lot severance.

Two letters of request for Council reconsideration of its recommended denial of severance.
Copied to Manager of Building & Planning Services and filed.
4.2 – Chris MacQuarrie, Natural Resources Canada Canadian Forest Service.
Research Project proposed for Killbear Provincial Park.
Copied to Director of Public Works for consideration.
4.3 – Peter Bethlenfalvy, Minister of Finance.
Funding of $5,000 to Parry Sound under the Ontario Cannabis Legalization Implementation Fund.
Filed
4.4 – Susanne Borup-Powell, Parry Sound Resident.
Support for Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.
4.5 – Stephen Heder, Parry Sound Resident.
Support for Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.
4.6 – Nancy Fraser, Parry Sound Resident.
Concerns with the posting of a “No Trespassing” Sign at Rabbit Canyon path.
4.7 – Carmen Quesnel, Parry Sound Resident.
Concerns with the posting of a “No Trespassing” Sign at Rabbit Canyon path.
4.8 – Linda Chase, Pat Clarke, Don Brickett, Ray Brown, Rachel Brown, Pauline Brown, Renate Koslowski, John & Donna McGill, Conrad van der Valk, Janet Patterson, Jill Murphy, Thom Morrissey, David & Jody Brunatti, Shelby Seegmiller, Brandon Seegmiller, Cameron Dunkin, Julia Mader, Roberta Smart.
Individual letters of the same text supporting Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.
All above letters related to the Fitness Trail were filed.

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda
7.1 – Taxi Driver’s License.
Resolution

That Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves Applicant #001-2021’s appeal and grants a temporary Taxi Driver’s Licence; and
That Council hereby directs the Issuer of Licences to issue the Applicant a six (6) month Probationary Taxi Driver’s Licence with the following conditions:
a) That a Level 2 Criminal Record Check be provided at the end of the temporary period (6 months), and annually thereafter as a part of the regular renewal process, without any new convictions; and
b) That subsequent Driver’s Abstracts, checked every six (6) months while holding a valid Taxi Driver’s Licence, do not contain any new convictions; and
c) That the owner of Parry Sound Taxi sign a responsibility agreement; and
d) That if the Town becomes aware of any violation of the applicant’s probation conditions set herein the licence be revoked immediately.
Carried

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – 2020 Statement of Remuneration Paid to Council and Appointed Board Members.
Resolution
That the 2020 Statement of Remuneration Paid to Council and Appointed Board Members, attached as Schedule “A”, be accepted.
Carried

9.2.2 – 2021 Operating Budget.
Following introductory statements by CAO Clayton Harris, Director of Finance Stephanie Phillips presented an overview of the 2021 draft operating budget covering such topics as impact to the taxpayer, historical tax rate increases, 2021 capital budget recap, draft operating budget highlights, COVID-19 fiscal challenges, COVID-19 funding applied, summary of net levy changes by division and items for Council consideration.

With respect to items for Council consideration as contained on page 43 of the 2021 budget binder, Council agreed to the following:
1. $6,150 increase contribution to Public Library.
2. $2,000 increase contribution to the Museum on Tower Hill, (with a motion moved by Councillor Keith, seconded by Councillor McCann and carried by Council to round up the draft increase of $1,674 to $2,000.).
3. $5,000 contribution to Tower Hill Children’s Garden.
4. Remove the draft $50,000 to replace the pedestrian bridge to the Point at Waubuno Beach. Council agreed per Director of Public Works Mike Kearn’s recommendation that before funds are committed to this work, engineering reports should be undertaken to determine what is needed to stabilize the path and bridge against erosion.
5. Remove the draft $20,000 for remediation of erosion on the Rotary Sunset Trail. Council directed CAO Clayton Harris to bring forward a resolution to set aside in reserve $20,000 using the Gas Tax Fund (which is now under a new name) for area redevelopment when a detailed proposal for the area is provided, and funding partnerships and the long-term intentions of Sail Parry Sound with respect to its lease (which expires in approximately four years) are known.
6. $8,200 contribution to Georgian Bay Forever for Plastic Diversion 2.0 Seabin and Education, with staff recommending at the time the budget by-law is considered, sources upon which to draw, such as from a relevant reserve.
7. No increase in funding provided to Park to Park Trail over the annual contribution of $6,000 already budgeted.
Resolution
That the 2021 Operating Budget as amended, be approved; and
That the Budget By-law be submitted to the April 20th, 2021 Council meeting for ratification.
Carried.

The following additional motions were considered by Council:
Direction for Staff Follow-up
That lighting be investigated, and costing done for the intersection of Pine Drive and Bowes Street.
Carried

Direction for Staff Follow-up
That staff be directed to refer the Park to Park (P2P) Trail issue to CiiNO as a regional body and consider the issue on a regional basis, to investigate whether other funding sources could be accessed, and/or a grant could be applied to hire an intern to respond to the administrative issues that P2P has put forth with respect to their funding ask.
Carried

By-laws
None beyond a confirming by-law for the meeting.

 

Council Agenda Preview – April 7, 2021

Tags

, , , , ,

There are three topics of interest in this week’s Town of Parry Sound council agenda.

4.1 – Steve Barnes, applicant for Hillcrest Ave. lot severance. 
Two letters of request for Council reconsideration of its recommended denial of severance.
I am at a bit of a loss to understand the argument here. The property owner is requesting to sever a piece of property that has a converted garage on it. It is very small and doesn’t meet the standards for property size and setbacks. They argue that they don’t intend to sell the severed property, but keep it as a rental property. But why the need to sever if it is a rental property. It is an expense to the owner with no obvious benefit, except to sell it. Property and housing in the town has become so ‘scarce’ that there is a business, and money to be made, by carving up properties into smaller and smaller sized lots. This potentially creates more housing but also creates issues with snow management, parking, ….
I think Council and Staff have made a decision of when too small, is too small.

4.4 to 4.8 – Letters Concerning Rabbit Canyon Trail and Property.
These letters concern the discussion(dispute?) between the Town and a Property Owner concerning the development on a lot that spans two branches of the Rotary Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail. I have offered my analysis in an earlier post. My intent in that post was not to take a position on the issue but to encourage discussion and perhaps negotiation. We don’t need to create our own Middle East type situation where the sides don’t negotiate in good faith. A negotiation depends on reasonable expectations on both sides. The town owns the ‘hammer here. Without the proper permits the lot can’t be developed, so the Town needs to be sensitive. On the other hand, the Property Owner may need to realize that what they believe the lot is worth is unrealistic. Without an agreement there will be no development or settlement. I suspect that signs will be pulled down by people using the trails as quickly as they can be put up.
My suggestion to the letter writers would be to make a proposal on how to manage the situation. This not a ‘Just Say No’ situation. The rights of property owners need to be respected, but not indulged.

9.2.1 – 2020 Statement of Remuneration Paid to Council and Appointed Board Members.
Screen clip from agenda posted below.

9.2.2 – 2021 Operating Budget.
The draft budget is available through this link as a PDF, about 10MB.

Abridged Meeting Agenda

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, (Taxi License Appeal Hearing);

Public Meeting
Council will hold two public meetings to consider proposed Zoning By-law amendments under Section 34 of the Planning Act per the following: 

2.1 Z/21-02 – George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Ravi Prasher)
The purpose of the first proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change the zoning of the property from Residential Medium Density (R2) to Residential High Density (R3). The proposal is to create a 36-unit apartment building. 

2.2 – Z/21-01 – Louisa Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Kingshott and Hurd).
The purpose of the second proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to amend the S.P. 26.72 Zone to a Rural Residential zone and recognize a reduced lot frontage of 34 metres for two provisionally created lots along Louisa Street. A rezoning was a condition of consent for related application B/37A/37B/2020 (TPS) 

Correspondence
4.1 – Steve Barnes, applicant for Hillcrest Ave. lot severance.
 
Two letters of request for Council reconsideration of its recommended denial of severance. 

4.2 – Chris MacQuarrie, Natural Resources Canada Canadian Forest Service.
Research Project proposed for Killbear Provincial Park. 

4.3 – Peter Bethlenfalvy, Minister of Finance.
Funding of $5,000 to Parry Sound under the Ontario Cannabis Legalization Implementation Fund.
4.4 – Susanne Borup-Powell, Parry Sound Resident.
Support for Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the 

Fitness Trail.
4.5 – Stephen Heder, Parry Sound Resident.
Support for Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail.

4.6 – Nancy Fraser, Parry Sound Resident.
Concerns with the posting of a “No Trespassing” Sign at Rabbit Canyon path.

4.7 – Carmen Quesnel, Parry Sound Resident.
Concerns with the posting of a “No Trespassing” Sign at Rabbit Canyon path. 

4.8 – Linda Chase, Pat Clarke, Don Brickett, Ray Brown, Rachel Brown, Pauline Brown, Renate Koslowski, John & Donna McGill.
Individual letters of the same text supporting Council’s position to deny construction of a vehicle bridge over the Fitness Trail. 

Deputations
None

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – 2020 Statement of Remuneration Paid to Council and Appointed Board Members.

Resolution
That the 2020 Statement of Remuneration Paid to Council and Appointed Board Members, attached as Schedule “A”, be accepted. 

9.2.2 – 2021 Operating Budget.
Resolution

That the 2021 Operating Budget as amended, be approved; and
That the Budget By-law be submitted to the April 20th, 2021 Council meeting for ratification. 

By-laws
Only a confirming by-law for the proceedings.

Showdown on Rabbit Canyon Trail (Revised)

Tags

, ,

(The text has been lightly edited to correct grammatical errors and add a couple of clarifications. These changes are noted in italics)

What seems like a title for a Zane Grey novel is the best description I could come up with concerning a dispute between the Town and a property owner regarding property access and development. Until last week I had no idea a Rabbit Canyon Trail even existed, or at least not the name of the trail. Then the Town of Parry Sound’s news release kicked things off.

The Rabbit Canyon Trail refers to the small ungroomed foot and bike path that leads from Waubuno Beach past the old pumphouse to the Tony Agnello Water Treatment Plant. I have walked and cycled along this path hundreds of times over the past decade. A small portion of the trail is located on private property located to the northwest of Waubuno Beach. The image below highlights the property (red) and shows the two trails. The trail closest to the shore is the Rabbit Canyon Trail. The property in question is about two-thirds of an acre with an MPAC assessed value of $95,000.

Rabbit Canyon Trail

The history of the property is recounted in the Town’s news release pasted below.

My understanding is that the property was sold to an individual in 1998 as part of a larger deal that involved Town property on what is now Baycrest Drive. The sale of the larger property was made on the understanding, if not the condition, that the property would be developed as residences. This has been the case with almost all of the lots developed. The Baycrest Drive development has an approximate MPAC assessment value of $10 million. That is worth about $150,000 annually in tax revenue and perhaps another $25,000 a year in water services. My back of the envelope calculation suggests that the development has been worth about $2 million to date in property taxes with the promise of a similar ‘tax annuity’ going forward. That is in addition to the original purchase price paid by the Developer. It should be remembered that the Town has been collecting property taxes on the lot in question for more than two decades. (Note – this transaction was revisited by Council in 2006.)

The Developer and the Town entered into an agreement that has for the most part worked out well for all involved. The neighbourhood is one of the most desirable, and high priced, in the Town and has been a magnet of sorts for upscale folks interested in living in Parry Sound. While many professionals, like those who work at the hospital or in law offices, have chosen to live on a waterfront property in one of the neighbouring municipalities, a number would prefer to be closer to work and not have to worry about a well and septic. Beyond Baycrest Drive there are relatively few upscale residential options in the Town besides condo living. This relative scarcity of options has certainly helped the Developer in finding buyers. At the same time the Town has benefited from having upscale accommodations to attract necessary professionals. Housing is perhaps the number one challenge in the area, regardless of price. We are short on services because professionals from the GTA, and I include tradespeople here, who want to be close to nature can’t find reasonable accommodation, at reasonable prices.

The Developer it seems would like to develop the property that spans the two town trails. They had an agreement in principle to be permitted to construct some sort of a ‘bridge’ over the Rotary Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail to access the property from Baycrest Drive. The Town, in reading their news release, has decided that while they may have agreed in principle to the access now feels that it is not now in the ‘public interest’ to permit it. I can understand their position. 

But, the Developer has delivered on the promises they made as part of the original agreement. Can the Town unilaterally decide that they will not honour this part of the agreement? It’s not as though there isn’t documentation regarding the expectations of both parties with regards to this property.

But, the Developer has a piece of property that is both desirable and undesirable as a residence. Yes, it does in theory have a view of the Big Sound, but the property is also sandwiched between two trails and on land that folks have come to use as a public park. Does any homeowner really want people on the trail checking out what’s going on in their yard and house at all times of the day and night? And building a ‘bridge’ to access the property will require a right-of-way from property from a Baycrest Drive, impacting lot value there. The logistics of building a bridge also seem difficult, expensive, and frankly, unrealistic. After a ‘landing spot’ for the bridge there isn’t that much land to work with for anything more than a bunkie.

The Town doesn’t want to negatively impact the Rotary Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail, an Amazing Place, with a bridge running over it. There won’t be much traffic or sound, but it really won’t provide a sense of nature. Would a bridge over the trail be any worse than the multiple trestles that crisscross the Town?

But, I think the Town wants people who do business with it to believe that the Town’s word and agreement can be trusted, even if it is little more than a handshake. This is now in question for an agreement that is much more than a handshake. Two current members of council were on council in 2006 when it revisited the agreement or understanding with the Developer. Did they at the time have no intention of honouring the outlines of the agreement? Or, did they have every intention of honouring it but now find it more ‘convenient’ to ignore it. There are communities in Canada who have well over a century of experience with governments preferring not to honour earlier agreements because it is not in the ‘public interest’.

Arguably the town holds the hammer, if not the sickle, in this situation. They have apparently simply said ‘nyet’ to the counterproposals offered by the Developer to address the impasse. I have not found that to be an effective way to do business. Failing to honour earlier agreements means that new developers will be more cautious in trusting the word of Staff and Council. If they are smart, they will attempt to gain their own leverage that can be pulled out when the Town backs off its commitments.

It seems to me that there is an agreement to be reached that may require all the parties to give a bit more than they would like. In the business world this is known as ‘taking a haircut’. But they can then move on to more important activities that benefit the Town and their own business. 

I would suggest that if Staff and Council can’t handle this type of negotiation with some professionalism and ‘class’ they had better buckle up for when developers get ready to develop the property traversed by the Voldemort Trail. This the trail system that ‘shall not be mentioned’ on the other side of Salt Dock Road. There have been multiple no trespassing signs posted on the private property for more than a decade. This hasn’t stopped folks from treating it like municipal property. Securing legitimate public access to this trail if development on the property were to start will probably require the Town to exchange some waterfront rights to the actual North Shore Rugged Trail. I can imagine the screams that will be heard from people if the Town were to suggest that they won’t negotiate.

Let’s get this done, it’s a no-brainer. It’s time to head down to the barbershop and get a trim. Let’s not turn this into a Zane Grey sequel, ‘Shootout at Rabbit Canyon Trail’.

Disclosure: I have no financial or other material interest in the outcome of this issue, but I would like to have continued access to the Rabbit Canyon Trail. I would also like to see evidence that the Town does live up to its agreements, even if they are a handshake. It’s the basis of trust that permeates all parts of municipal government, and our trust in their decisions and actions. I have spoken to the representative for the Developer regarding this issue. I have not spoken to the Town. My experience has been that the Town will not discuss the issue with me because I am not a party to the matter. My understanding is that they won’t even speak with the developer’s representative in a constructive manner.