Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – November 17, 2020

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Once again there are no real surprises with the exception perhaps of 7.1.1 which came out of the Closed Session (brief discussion follows). Those of you interested in the activity and plans for the Town of Parry Sound Downtown Business Association will appreciate the summary of their deputation, 5.1.

7.1.1 – Town Position on Parry Sound Public Library Building Ownership.
This is interesting because it suggests the Library Board had requested the Town to take over ownership and responsibility for the Library building. This is very understandable. There are a number of publicly funded services in Town that are only sufficiently resourced to support basic operational functions, not the care and maintenance of the associated building.
We have been reminded of the costs involved with the Town’s decision to spend more than $1 million on each of the Stockey Centre, the Bobby Orr Community Centre, and Big Sound Marina for only necessary infrastructure upgrades and repairs. This is in addition to about $400,000 annually in direct support for each of the Stockey Centre and Bobby Orr Community Centre to cover their losses on operations. In total this adds up to more than a million dollars annually to support these operations without the cost of facility maintenance and upgrades. And now the Town wants to build a new recreation facility, Da Pool, which will most likely add a half million dollars annually in additional operational expenses. And there will be carried expenses related to the construction.
This reminds me of a deadbeat father who supports his current family, is planning for his next family, and tells his ex and her children to support themselves.
Dear Town Leaders – You created it, you support it.

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, (staff member performance review).
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes, (request for Town to take ownership of a property).
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (claim against Town funds).
n) educating or training council members and no member discusses or otherwise deals with any matter in a way that materially advances the business or decision-making of Council, (Site Locations for Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre)

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the storm this past Sunday, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that there were some issues due to downed trees and power outages, and Lakeland Power changed a pole at the north end of Town due to damage; however given the nature of the strong storm surge, damage was relatively minimal.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the status of the installation of the railing on Cascade St. hill east of the tracks, Mr. Kearns reported that this work should be completed soon.

3.2.3 In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry on an update on the usage, revenues and costs associated with the reopening of the Bobby Orr Community Centre and the Stockey Centre, Director of Finance Stephanie Phillips said that a report would be forthcoming to the next Council Meeting and that the finances are on track with projections. CAO Clayton Harris also reported that the Senior Leadership Team will be meeting tomorrow to discuss how to respond if the province does issue further lock- down directives.

Correspondence
4.1 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.

Carling Township opposition to EMS Surplus Levy

4.2 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.
Future Special Meeting to be held to hear recommendations from Wellness Centre & Pool Committee after the grant has been determined.

4.3 – Rita Orr, CEO, Parry Sound Public Library.
Budget request of $211,150.00 for 2021.

4.4 – Parry Sound Affordable Housing Development Corporation.
Copy of letter to Parry Sound District Social Services Administration Board requesting that it continue to pay property taxes for the Housing Dev. Corporation’s properties if MPAC grants a tax exemption; and e-mail to the Town regarding current and proposed initiatives related to a seniors housing complex and purchase of a local motel to provide housing.

(Note – no indication was offered as to the action taken with respect to these Correspondence items.)

Deputations
5.1 – April Denman, Executive Director, Downtown Business Association; Amy Black, Chair Events Committee; Seanan Megyesi, Chair Marketing Committee; and Brenda Ryan, Chair Beautification Committee.
2020 Year in Review
DBA Executive Director April Denman addressed Council noting that this year is the 50th anniversary of Business Improvement Areas (BIAs) – a made in Ontario innovation, with 500 across Canada now, including 300 in Ontario. Ms. Denman expressed appreciation for the working relationship with the Town’s Public Works Director, Parks & Recreation Manager and their teams. The fundraising meter campaign raised $256.78 for each of RISE, The Salvation Army, Hope Pregnancy Centre, and the Mary St. Centre; and the recipients of the next parking meter fundraising campaign will be the Guides, Georgian Jumpers, Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, and Whispering River Orchestra. Ms. Denman introduced Committee Chairs and each spoke in turn.
Events Committee Chair and co-owner of Pardon My Garden Amy Black reported on two events held this year – Hallowe’en in the Downtown partnering with Parry Sound Public Library; and the Parry Sound Girlfriends weekend extended this year to a week- long event to accommodate spacing out of store visits, with 188 registrants so far, good feedback and a good base from which to build on again for next year.
Marketing Committee Chair and owner of Boston Pizza Seanan Meygesi reported that in light of the COVID pandemic, marketing was adjusted from a focus on events to highlighting local businesses, introducing the hashtag #localfirst and sharing members’ posts to expand local reach. Along with launch of a new website, the DBA created an instagram account making it easier to share news with 480 followers, and restructured twitter. “New Feature Fridays” are running on facebook telling background stories on new business owners and sharing members’ posts, with an increase of 25-30 followers a month since March. Going forward the DBA will work alongside the Events Committee to develop safe social distancing events that will continue to focus on shopping locally.
Chair of the Beautification Committee and owner of FAD Brenda Ryan reported that the Beautification Committee has almost completed its plan, implemented to meet the goal of creating an atmosphere that attracts more people to explore the downtown core. The following points were made by Ms. Ryan:
– The installation of 10 in-ground gardens – the biggest project is now complete. Logging 250 hours this year, 4 volunteers working Saturdays starting at 7 AM clean up the gardens, weed and dead-head. With the garden expansion program that also includes 2 “living room gardens” in the parking lot, the DBA is looking at having a more structured volunteer program assigning volunteers to certain gardens
– Continued with seasonal installation of the black planters in front of businesses.
– Removal of many of the overhanging metal signs, replaced by more quaint wooden carved blade signs projecting from businesses, making a more visually attractive and pedestrian-friendly feel. Businesses that didn’t get them this year are asking for them. 3- 4 signs are still to be installed at the Beatty building once their renovations have been completed.
– Trillium banners added to the collection, with the hope that banners will be installed all the way down Bay Street.
– Sidewalk cafes became more of a reality this year, with hopes that Council will support extending the patio season.
– Installed cigarette butt receptacles with good feedback received on these. – Plan to work over next years with building owners to improve facades.
– When veterans banners come down, Christmas decorations will go up, and a multi- year plan being developed for those.
– Lights installed in Jukes Lane.
– Appreciation extended to Town staff for helping, in particular April McNamara and Mike Kearns, as well as Mayor & Council for their support in transforming the downtown.

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda
7.1.1 – Town Position on Parry Sound Public Library Building Ownership.

Resolution
Be it resolved that Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby advise the Parry Sound Public Library Board, that the Town does not wish to own the Library Board’s building on Mary Street.
Carried

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Letter of support to Ministry of Energy regarding net-metering.

Resolution
That as measure of the Town’s commitment to energy management, grid resilience and moving toward being a net-zero community, Council hereby authorizes the Mayor to sign the attached letter of support to the Ministry of Energy regarding net-metering in the Town of Parry Sound.
Carried

9.2.1 – Respond to Council Direction Regarding Payment of Cash-in-Lieu of Parking
Resolution
That, as a result of staff’s review as documented in the attached report, no changes will be made to the cash-in-lieu of parking policy/By-law.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Funding Agreement for Installation of Access Controls (Fobbing).

By-law 2020 – 7082
Being a by-law to authorize ratification of the execution of an agreement with PMCN for a Business Technology Improvement Grant for access controls (fobbing).
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.1 – 2020 Debenture Capital Works – Waubeek & Isabella Streets.
By-law 2020 – 7083
Being a By-law to approve the submission of an application to Ontario Infrastructure and Lands Corporation (“OILC”) for the long-term financing of certain capital works (Isabella and Waubeek Streets) of The Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound (The “Municipality”); and to authorize the entering into of a rate offer letter agreement pursuant to which the municipality will issue debentures to OILC.

About Bobby Orr

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I do not share the political position that Mr. Orr put forward in an ad in the New Hampshire Union Leader. But I understand why he did and the politics he was supporting.

Politics is much like religion. You either actively search for what you believe to be most consistent with your interests and values, or you adopt the religion and politics of your family and community.

I believe Mr. Orr’s politics were learned and adopted from the community that he politically ‘came of age in’. Not his teens or twenties, but rather his thirties and beyond.

When Mr. Orr finished his hockey career, he was a legend and bankrupt. He probably had limited professional skills beyond his considerable hockey abilities. What he had developed was determination, a good heart, and a world-class reputation. This is what he needed to leverage to succeed in his post hockey years.

I suspect that Mr. Orr’s financial success depends in large part on people, particularly businessmen, who valued his company and his endorsement. Given the regional nature of hockey almost a half century ago this probably meant he was supported by businessmen in the U.S. northeast. Having a legendary hockey star on hand to shake hands at a car dealership, or to speak at a sales meeting, would have been a good business investment. Although I do not know the details of Mr. Orr’s business activities, we have seen how his presence at a Parry Sound event can bring out folks and open wallets for charitable causes. That ability can be leveraged for charity and business.

The politics of these northeast U.S. businessmen would have been conservative and Republican. Being adopted by this community, not as a shill, but as a legend who could connect to people, meant that he learned their style and their politics. It wasn’t a matter of not biting the hand that feeds you but rather a belief born out of experience that these are good people, and their politics make sense. Until some four years ago taking out an ad in support of a Republican president would not have been newsworthy or polarizing.

I worked in the U.S. for the better part of three decades. I would estimate that more than 80% of my American business friends vote Republican. These are good people with whom I don’t agree when it comes to politics. Some are mortified by the behaviour of the current president and just don’t want to discuss it. How they voted last month I don’t know, but I suspect most voted Republican down ballot and did not check the box for president. While they might not have been willing to support Trump, they certainly weren’t going to vote for a Democrat. They have a conscience but are still Republicans to the core.

I think Mr. Orr was encouraged by his ‘community’ to place the ad. If you benefit from having Republican connections, you sometimes have to prove you are ‘all-in’. It’s not unlike a religion where you are expected to demonstrate your commitment by going door to door to share the faith, or standing on a corner and asking for donations, or even going to war. Fortunately, it’s not like an inner-city gang where you prove your loyalty by ‘offing’ a member of an opposing gang.

Let’s cut Mr. Orr some slack and appreciate him for what he is and what he does. We shouldn’t judge people by their race, religion or politics. Let’s judge people by their actions, not their opinions.

Council Agenda Preview – November 17, 2020

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Nothing of note in this week’s Town of Parry Sound council meeting agenda. It’s very short so take a quick look for anything that might be important to you. Item 4.1 is sort of interesting – cheap, cheap, cheap.

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, (staff member performance review)
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes, (request for Town to take ownership of a property);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (claim against Town funds);
n) educating or training council members and no member discusses or otherwise deals with any matter in a way that materially advances the business or decision-making of Council, (Site Locations for Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre)

Correspondence
4.1 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.

Carling Township opposition to EMS Surplus Levy.

4.2 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.
Future Special Meeting to be held to hear recommendations from Wellness Centre & Pool Committee after the grant has been determined.

4.3 – Rita Orr, CEO, Parry Sound Public Library.
Budget request of $211,150.00 for 2021.

Deputations
5.1 – April Denham, Executive Director, Downtown Business Association; and Brenda Ryan, Chair Beautification Committee; Amy Black/Karen Hobson, Chair, Events Committee; Seanan Megyesi, Marketing Committee.
2020 Year in Review

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Letter of support to Ministry of Energy regarding net-metering.
Resolution
That as measure of the Town’s commitment to energy management, grid resilience and moving toward being a net-zero community, Council hereby authorizes the Mayor to sign the attached letter of support to the Ministry of Energy regarding net-metering in the Town of Parry Sound.

9.2.1 – Respond to Council Direction Regarding Payment of Cash-in-Lieu of Parking.
Resolution
That, as a result of staff’s review as documented in the attached report, no changes will be made to the cash-in-lieu of parking policy/By-law.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Funding Agreement for Installation of Access Controls (Fobbing).

By-law 2020 – 7082
Being a by-law to authorize ratification of the execution of an agreement with PMCN for a Business Technology Improvement Grant for access controls (fobbing)

10.4.1 – 2020 Debenture Capital Works – Waubeek & Isabella Streets.
By-law 2020 – 7083
Being a By-law to approve the submission of an application to Ontario Infrastructure and Lands Corporation (“OILC”) for the long-term financing of certain capital works (Isabella and Waubeek Streets) of The Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound (The “Municipality”); and to authorize the entering into of a rate offer letter agreement pursuant to which the municipality will issue debentures to OILC.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – November 3, 2020

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There were no surprises or important decisions arising from the November 3rd meeting of the Town of Parry Sound council meeting. A summary is presented below.

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (developer interest in municipal property purchase)
Carried

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding response time by the electrical utility to a fire at Joseph Street yesterday, Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson reported that the response time was very respectable, and staff continue to work on gathering necessary information for the Mayor to meet with Lakeland Power as was directed at the last Council meeting, following the report of a lengthy response time by the utility to another recent fire.

Correspondence
4.1 – Brenda Paul, Clerk, Township of Machar.

Concerns regarding permanent closure of Drive Test Centre in Sundridge.
Filed

4.2 – Don McArthur, Clerk, South River.
Concerns regarding permanent closure of Drive Test Centre in Sundridge.
Filed

4.3 – William Patterson, Director, Near North Crime Stoppers.
Request to proclaim January, 2021 as Crime Stoppers Month.
See item 9.5.2

4.4 – Canadian Centre for Women’s Empowerment.
Request to proclaim November 26, 2020 as Day of Recognition for Survivors of Financial Abuse and Economic Injustice.
See item 9.5.1

4.5 – Jason Predie, Parry Sound EMS.
Request for monetary donation towards 2020 Toy/Food Drive.
Filed

4.6 – Chris Pettinger, Co-Founder Trestle Brewing Company Limited.
Request for Town support permitting patio extensions beyond January 1, 2021.
Forwarded to relevant staff

4.7 – Lawrence & Sandra Mulligan.
Concerns regarding assessment, property taxes and trespassing on property.
Forwarded to relevant staff

Deputations
5.1 – Andrew Ryeland, Park to Park Trail Association.

Mr. Andrew Ryeland addressed Council with respect to the work of Park to Park (P2P) Trail Association’s work of connecting Killbear and Algonquin Provincial Parks with a multi-use 230 km trail. Further details provided by Mr. Ryeland included the following:
– COVID-19 this year meant a delay in trail opening, and loss of revenue both through a reduction in membership sales and cancelled fundraising rally. Trail usage was limited to local users and detailed COVID-19 health and safety precautions were approved by Local Health Unit. With ATV riding being an outdoor activity and vehicle spacing requiring distancing, P2P Trail was the only major tourism attraction permitted in Parry Sound by the province due to COVID-19 restrictions, in late spring and early summer, 2020 and ATV sales have increased this year.
– Trail activities have positive social impacts, and the Tourism Regional Economic Impact Model (TREIM) last analyzed in 2018 shows total visitor spending of $731,000, retail trade of $50,000, accommodation at $70,000, food and beverage at $50,000, indirect tax at $106,000, and the creation of 5 full-time jobs.
– Bridge repair of the 14 aging bridges continues to require labour and supplies.
– In response to a Council inquiry, Mr. Ryeland confirmed that while argoes are not tailored for trails, they are permitted on the P2P Trail.
– Organizational issues include the need to gather and organize governance and administrative documents and engage an accredited external auditor. P2P is managed with many volunteers and only 1 employee who is responsible for all governance issues, admin activities, grant applications, filing and day to day activities.
Mr. Ryeland concluded his presentation noting that their budget for additional administrative and maintenance staffing requires $100,000 from municipalities and that the specific request of the Town is for $20,000 which is an increased ask over last year.
Council member response included support for funding more administrative support to apply for grants which in turn could decrease the funding asks of municipalities. Mayor McGarvey directed that the budget request be referred to the budget process and encouraged Mr. Ryeland to follow-up with a formal letter of request.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Minimum Maintenance Standards for Municipal Highways.

Resolution
That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound receive the attached report on Minimum Maintenance Standards for Municipal Highways for information purposes.
Carried

9.2.1 – Consent Application B/37/20 (PS) – (Kingshott/Crookshank-Hurd).
Resolution
That B37/2020 (88 and 94 Louisa Street) – Kingshott/Crookshank-Hurd, be supported subject to:
1. The payment of cash-in-lieu of parkland for the two newly created lots;
2. That the severance lot lines be reconfigured to ensure that the entirety of the ROW is on the Retained parcels;
3. That the existing 51(26) agreement apply to the newly severed lots as well as the retained lots;
4. That the lands be rezoned to ensure compliance with the Zoning By-law; and
5. That a scoped report be required to ensure the proposal complies with Section 4.5 of the Town’s Official Plan.
Carried

9.5.1 – Canadian Centre For Women’s Empowerment request for proclamation. Resolution
Whereas economic abuse is a deliberate pattern of control in which individuals interfere with their partner’s ability to acquire, use, and maintain economic resources; and
Whereas a lack of access to economic resources undermines a woman’s independence and agency, such as limiting her access to social support services, undermining mental well-being and exacerbating other risk factors contributing to poverty and other forms of marginalization affecting women; and
Whereas each day in Canada, approximately 51% of women staying in shelters for women and children report experiencing financial abuse, economic abuse is a seldom- talked about yet prevalent issue faced by survivors of domestic violence in Canada; and
Whereas economic abuse has happened to many generations of Canadian women and continues to happen regardless of socio-economic status, race, age or other identity factors; and
Whereas it is of utmost importance that government, at all levels, take action to protect victims and support survivors of economic abuse;
Now Therefore Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby authorize the Mayor to proclaim November 26, 2020 as “The Day of Recognition for Survivors of Financial Abuse and Economic Injustice” in the Town of Parry Sound.
Carried

9.5.2 – Proclamation of January, 2021 as Crime Stoppers Month.
Resolution
Whereas Crime Stoppers, an internationally recognized program, is a partnership of the public, the police and the media providing citizens with a proactive program to anonymously assist our police partners in the solving of crime, contributing to an improved quality of life in our communities and 

Whereas since inception, anonymous calls to Near North CRIME STOPPERS have assisted the Police and other investigative agencies in making 1,715 arrests, recovering stolen property valued at over $4 million and seizing almost $52 million in illegal drugs;
Now Therefore Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound hereby authorizes the Mayor to declare January 2021 as Crime Stoppers Month in the Town of Parry Sound.
Carried

By-laws
None

Council Agenda Preview – November 3, 2020

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It is a very light agenda this week. I hope that it is because Staff is focused on the 2021 budget. There is one interesting item on the agenda, a Letter, that I offer some thoughts on.

4.7 – Lawrence & Sandra Mulligan. Concerns regarding assessment, property taxes and trespassing on property.
This concerns a property that most folks would think is in McDougall but actually has a Town of Parry Sound municipal address, and carries town tax rates. It is the new building that is reached by following Oakridge Road South onto a gravel road that was built by the Mulligans. The property carries an assessment of $1.6 million and an annual tax bill of $25,000 despite having no town services. I think that MPAC has screwed up on the assessment and unless the Town decides to push MPAC to correct the issue the owners will be out of pocket for more than $100,000 before the next reassessment window opens.
I was involved in a similar situation a few years ago when another property owner received a smaller but similarly shocking assessment and tax bill. The Town was not too quick to act until an embarrassing mistake on their part related to the property came to light. With the threat of public disclosure of the mistake the Town and MPAC worked ‘very quickly’ to revise the assessment and tax bill to an appropriate amount. The Town initially tried to pin the mistake on others but I suspect they realized that public disclosure would be sufficiently embarrassing to obscure any value in finger pointing.
The problem here is not the value of the home, or even the amount of land involved. It is a landlocked property that is crossed by the Voldemort Trail (more on this later). It enjoys a beautiful Georgian Bay overlook, but it does not own the waterfront. The waterfront is owned by the Town of Parry Sound and is part of the North Shore Rugged Trail. If you have walked along the North Shore Rugged Trail you will recognize this stretch as where the quarry used to be. I suspect that MPAC assigned the value of the waterfront access to it. An undeveloped property right beside it with twice the area, 84 acres versus 35 acres, and a similar Georgian Bay overlook, carries an assessed value of $600,000. It also has lakefront access, albeit Strain Lake. In theory then the Mulligan property should have a value half of that, let’s say $300,000. Add in a nice cottage/house that is valued at $500,000 for the building, and you have a total assessed value of $800,000 or so, half of the current assessment. That still means a $12,000 annual tax bill that has no services (garbage, roads, hydrants, …), but it is much more reasonable.
About the Voldemort Trail, the trail that shall not be mentioned. It is not part of the Town’s trail system and runs through private property behind the Smelter Wharf, including the Mulligan property. The Town seems to believe that they have no responsibility for people’s use of the trail, and it ‘shall not be mentioned’. My questions were largely ignored three years ago when I asked why this trail, which is a very popular with people walking their dogs, wasn’t part of the official Trails Master Plan. Don’t Ask – Don’t Tell seems to have been the attitude.
The Voldemort Trail is a problem for the Town because of its popularity and high use. I suspect that the Town would like to provide formal access to it because of its popularity but it would need to buy land and then assume liability for claims arising from its use. I also suspect the people who own the land would like to swap trail land for certain Georgian Bay waterfront rights that are currently part of the North Shore Rugged Trail. A general agreement was reached a few years ago between the landowners and the Town to start discussions on how to develop this private property. Land with waterfront is much more valuable to both the landowners (selling price) and the Town (higher assessed values for waterfront properties).
Let’s see what develops. Without a push the Town will sit on its thumb. All they need to do is wander down to the MPAC office in the town’s building and suggest the assessment be revisited.
(This is why it’s worth reading each and every council meeting agenda. There is stuff mentioned that only becomes relevant months or years later.)

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (developer interest in municipal property purchase)

Correspondence
4.1 – Brenda Paul, Clerk, Township of Machar.

Concerns regarding permanent closure of Drive Test Centre in Sundridge.

4.2 – Don McArthur, Clerk, South River.
Concerns regarding permanent closure of Drive Test Centre in Sundridge.

4.3 – William Patterson, Director, Near North Crime Stoppers.
Request to proclaim January, 2021 as Crime Stoppers Month.

4.4 – Canadian Centre for Women s Empowerment.
Request to proclaim November 26, 2020 as Day of Recognition for Survivors of Financial Abuse and Economic Injustice

4.5 – Jason Predie, Parry Sound EMS.
Request for monetary donation towards 2020 Toy/Food Drive.

4.6 – Chris Pettinger, Co-Founder Trestle Brewing Company Limited.
Request for Town support permitting patio extensions beyond January 1, 2021.

4.7 – Lawrence & Sandra Mulligan.
Concerns regarding assessment, property taxes and trespassing on property.

Deputations
5.1 – Nick Ryeland, Peter Searle, Executive Director, Park to Park Trail Association.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Minimum Maintenance Standards for Municipal Highways.

Resolution
That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound receive the attached report on Minimum Maintenance Standards for Municipal Highways for information purposes.

9.2.1 – Consent Application B/37/20 (PS) – (Kingshott/Crookshank-Hurd).
Resolution
That B37/2020 (88 and 94 Louisa Street) – Kingshott/Crookshank-Hurd, be supported subject to:
1. The payment of cash-in-lieu of parkland for the two newly created lots;
2. That the severance lot lines be reconfigured to ensure that the entirety of the ROW is on the Retained parcels;
3. That the existing 51(26) agreement apply to the newly severed lots as well as the retained lots;
4. That the lands be rezoned to ensure compliance with  theZoning By-law; and
5. That a scoped report be required to ensure the proposal complies with Section 4.5 of the Town’s Official Plan.

9.5.1 – Canadian Centre For Women’s Empowerment request for proclamation.
Resolution
Whereas economic abuse is a deliberate pattern of control in which individuals interfere with their partner’s ability to acquire, use, and maintain economic resources; and
Whereas a lack of access to economic resources undermines a woman’s independence and agency, such as limiting her access to social support services, undermining mental well-being and exacerbating other risk factors contributing to poverty and other forms of marginalization affecting women; and
Whereas each day in Canada, approximately 51% of women staying in shelters for women and children report experiencing financial abuse, economic abuse is a seldom- talked about yet prevalent issue faced by survivors of domestic violence in Canada; and
Whereas economic abuse has happened to many generations of Canadian women and continues to happen regardless of socio-economic status, race, age or other identity factors; and
Whereas it is of utmost importance that government, at all levels, take action to protect victims and support survivors of economic abuse;
Now Therefore Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby authorize the Mayor to proclaim November 26, 2020 as “The Day of Recognition for Survivors of Financial Abuse and Economic Injustice” in the Town of Parry Sound.

9.5.2 – Proclamation of January, 2021 as Crime Stoppers Month.
Resolution
Whereas Crime Stoppers, an internationally recognized program, is a partnership of the public, the police and the media providing citizens with a proactive program to anonymously assist our police partners in the solving of crime, contributing to an improved quality of life in our communities and
Whereas since inception, anonymous calls to Near North CRIME STOPPERS have assisted the Police and other investigative agencies in making 1,715 arrests, recovering stolen property valued at over $4 million and seizing almost $52 million in illegal drugs;
Now Therefore Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound hereby authorizes the Mayor to declare January 2021 as Crime Stoppers Month in the Town of Parry Sound.

By-laws
None

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – October 20, 2020

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There are a few interesting items that arose during the meeting. Refer to the appropriate section for more information.

3.2.3 & Other Business – Local emergency hydro resources.
3.2.6 – Insurance cost increases.
10.2.2 – Amendment to Parks By-law 2017-6752 to remove smoking designated areas.

Abridged Minutes

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees; (Library Board applications)
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes; (Proposed property exchange)
n) educating or training council members and no member discusses or otherwise deals with any matter in a way that materially advances the business or decision-making of Council. (Site Locations for West Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre)

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding the status of upcoming public events, Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson reported that the Public Health Unit released guidelines yesterday which indicate that Hallowe’en practices as we know them may continue, provided specific health protocols are undertaken and that further communication will be provided to the public as it becomes available. With respect to the Santa Claus parade, Mr. Thompson reported that there are currently discussions with the Health Unit and the Optimist Club to discuss how an alternative Santa Claus parade can be done safely. Given that the COVID-19 situation changes and requires adaptation, more information will be provided to the public as it becomes available about these events, as well as Remembrance Day.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns confirmed that the Public Works Department is ready for snow, whenever it comes.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry regarding response time to a recent house fire at the northwest corner of Gibson & Cascade Streets, Mr. Thompson reported that there was no delay in firefighting activities at the scene. Crews quickly deployed an exterior attack onto the building, there was a significant knock down, and a great save. Mr. Thompson said that there was an approximate one hour delayed response by hydro to shut off power, a delay which is now common with hydro. Standard operating procedure of firefighters is to consider any electrical wires as live, and therefore avoid them, until a representative of the utility company declares them not live or shuts off the power. This is of concern as it may result in delayed firefighting at a fire scene.
Councillor Borneman responded that he understood the problem was that Lakeland Power doesn’t have enough line staff living in Parry Sound to cover on-call, and that a solution might be to have Lakeland contract with Hydro One to provide this service.
Councillors agreed to add this item to the agenda for consideration.

3.2.4 – Mr. Kearns responded to the Mayor’s inquiry regarding advertising for leaf and pumpkin pick-up, that he would follow-up with this.

3.2.5 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding a CN train delayed on the tracks a couple of weeks ago by 10-15 minutes, Mr. Kearns reported that CN officials did give notice electronically to the Town and Fire Department regarding the planned stoppage on the track and the expected duration.

3.2.6 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry on insurance, Director of Finance Stephanie Phillips reported that a draft RFP is currently being prepared for a three-week advertisement posting targeting December 15th, 2020 for renewal, which is when the current insurance expires. Ms. Phillips also reported that insurance brokers are forecasting a 40-50% increase in rates for 2021.

Correspondence
4.1 – Sylvia Jones, Solicitor General, Minister Responsible for Anti-Racism.

Update regarding Anti-Racism Directorate and regulatory work being done to bring the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019 into force as well as other policing matters.

4.2 – Nina Bifolchi, Mayor, Town of Wasaga Beach.
Copy of letter to Premier Ford re: concerns with safety risks as a result of a recent unauthorized car rally in Wasaga Beach, and requests for tougher laws.

4.3 – Cindy Filmore, Administrative Services Coordinator Town of Kearney.
Resolution rejecting the Town of Parry Sound’s request regarding a Supplemental Emergency Medical Services Levy.

4.4 – Mackenzie Taylor, Records Clerk/Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.
Proposed 2021 Budget to adjust service levels to achieve lowest possible tax rate.

All correspondence items were filed.

Deputations
5.1 – Rita Orr – CEO, Tom Lundy – Chair, Parry Sound Public Library.

Library Update; link to presentation:
Parry Sound Public Library Board Chair Tom Lundy introduced the Library’s infomercial on activities undertaken since shut-down in mid-March due to COVID-19 per the following: (link)
Mr. Lundy and Ms. Orr reported that since mid-March with the onset of closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Library staff has worked to find new and creative ways to continue to provide services. Mr. Lundy noted that the Board’s 12 new policies passed was thanks to staff who prepared them, and that these policies have been recognized not only in Ontario, but outside Canada, with other boards using the Library’s policies as templates. Ms. Orr reported that the Library has seen an increase in the loan of digital books with 15,000 borrowed between March and September. Library cards can be obtained on-line now; 32 people signed up on-line in one month which is a significant number. Ms. Orr noted that the Library is hopeful it will be able to re-open to five days a week in January, up from its three days a week now; and that they received the wonderful news today of a donation from CN in the amount of $10,000.
Mr. Lundy concluded with the comment that while Ms. Orr had coined the phrase “The Little Library that Grew”, he suggested it should be “The Little Library That Roared” as its impact is up there with much larger libraries.

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda
7.1 – Parry Sound Public Library Board Appointment
Resolution
THAT Council hereby accepts the resignation of Abbey Dudas and appoints Jen Hoddy to the Parry Sound Public Library Board effective immediately; and
That Resolution 2018-142, appointing individuals to various Boards and Committees is hereby amended.
Carried

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Waste Diversion and Transition update
Resolution

That Council receive the report attached as Schedule A regarding Waste Diversion and Transition, for information purposes.
Carried

9.3.1 – 2021 Council Meeting Dates.
Resolution

That pursuant to By-law 2020-7061, Section 3, paragraph 4, Council approves Schedule “A” as attached, the 2021 schedule of Regular Meetings of Council.
Carried

9.4.1 – 2021 Budgeting Schedule.
Resolution

That Council hereby approves the 2021 Budgeting Schedule as set out in the attached Schedule “A”; and
That Council sets the 2021 budget guideline for a tax levy increase between 1.8% and 3.6% for the operating budget in the absence of a collective agreement for 2021; and
Further that the guidelines will be updated as per the policy once the collective agreement is reached if budget deliberations are still underway.
Carried

Other Business
That Staff be directed to meet with Lakeland Power encouraging them to enter into a contract with Hydro One to respond to fires for power shut off services.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Tesla Powerwall at Pound.

By-law 2020 – 7077
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with Bracebridge Generation Ltd. as part of the SPEEDIER project, to install a Tesla Powerwall at the West Parry Sound Dog Pound.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.2.1 – Rezoning Application – Z/20/05 –1793951 Ontario Inc. (Greystone/Lighthouse) – Lifting of “h” symbol.
By-law 2020 – 7078
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law) as amended to remove a holding provision for 1793951 Ontario Inc./Greystone/Lighthouse (20 Salt Dock Road).
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.2.2 – Amendment to Parks By-law 2017-6752 to remove smoking designated areas.
By-law 2020 – 7079
Being a By-law to amend the Parks By-law 2017-6752, to remove smoking designated areas.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

 

Da Pool Plan, October 22, 2020 Version

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Here is a link to the agenda materials that are being supplied for the meeting Thursday, October 22nd concerning the West Parry Sound Area Recreation & Culture Centre, hereafter referred to as “Da Pool”.

The document is also available from the Town’s website through this link.

It’s a very interesting document and goes into detail regarding the recommendation of the current Y centre on Parry Sound Drive as the future site of Da Pool. The recommendation is to tear down the existing building to permit construction of the new facility.

This is a rather large document, 32MB, so you might want to wait until you are on WiFi to download the document. I highly recommend that you review the document to understand what is being proposed. As appropriate, contact your council member if you have a comment or opinion to share.

The meeting on Thursday can be streamed online and presumably will be available later on YouTube. I may catch it on replay.

Council Agenda Preview – October 20, 2020

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I offer a few comments on the upcoming Town of Parry Sound council meeting agenda.

Closed Session – n) educating or training council members and no member discusses or otherwise deals with any matter in a way that materially advances the business or decision-making of Council. (Site Locations for West Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre)
It seems things are getting a little heated with respect to the ‘pool’ location.

9.1.1 – Waste Diversion and Transition update.
I would be interested to know if the Town is monitoring COVID-19 in the Town’s wastewater. That seems to be one of the best tools for monitoring the level of infection in a community. Just because there have been no reported cases doesn’t mean there aren’t any. Only positive tests are referenced in the daily reports from the area health unit, and that depends on people deciding to get tested. There are any number of reasons they might choose not to if the symptoms are mild.

10.2.2 – Amendment to Parks By-law 2017-6752 to remove smoking designated areas.
It seems there is no smoking permitted in any of the parks.

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees; (Library Board applications)
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes; (Proposed property exchange)
n) educating or training council members and no member discusses or otherwise deals with any matter in a way that materially advances the business or decision-making of Council. (Site Locations for West Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre)

Correspondence
4.1 – Sylvia Jones, Solicitor General, Minister Responsible for Anti-Racism.
Update regarding Anti-Racism Directorate and regulatory work being done to bring the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019 into force as well as other policing matters.

4.2 – Nina Bifolchi, Mayor, Town of Wasaga Beach.
Copy of letter to Premier Ford re: concerns with safety risks as a result of a recent unauthorized car rally in Wasaga Beach, and requests for tougher laws.

4.3 – Cindy Filmore, Administrative Services Coordinator Town of Kearney.
Resolution rejecting the Town of Parry Sound`s request regarding a Supplemental Emergency Medical Services Levy.

4.4 – Mackenzie Taylor, Records Clerk/Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.
Proposed 2021 Budget to adjust service levels to achieve lowest possible tax rate

Deputations
5.1 – Rita Orr – CEO, Tom Lundy – Chair, Parry Sound Public Library.

RE: Library Update; link to presentation.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Waste Diversion and Transition update.

Resolution
That Council receive the report attached as Schedule A regarding Waste Diversion and Transition, for information purposes.

9.3.1 – 2021 Council Meeting Dates.
Resolution

That pursuant to By-law 2020-7061, Section 3, paragraph 4, Council approves Schedule “A” as attached, the 2021 schedule of Regular Meetings of Council.

9.4.1 – 2021 Budgeting Schedule.
Resolution

That Council hereby approves the 2021 Budgeting Schedule as set out in the attached Schedule “A”; and
That Council sets the 2021 budget guideline for a tax levy increase between 1.8% and 3.6% for the operating budget in the absence of a collective agreement for 2021; and
Further that the guidelines will be updated as per the policy once the collective agreement is reached if budget deliberations are still underway.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Tesla Powerwall at Pound.

By-law 2020 – 7077
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with Bracebridge Generation Ltd. as part of the SPEEDIER project, to install a Tesla Powerwall at the West Parry Sound Dog Pound.

10.2.1 – Rezoning Application – Z/20/05 –1793951 Ontario Inc. (Greystone/Lighthouse) – Lifting of “h” symbol.
By-law 2020 – 7078
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law) as amended to remove a holding provision for 1793951 Ontario Inc./Greystone/Lighthouse (20 Salt Dock Road).

10.2.2 – Amendment to Parks By-law 2017-6752 to remove smoking designated areas.
By-law 2020 – 7079
Being a By-law to amend the Parks By-law 2017-6752, to remove smoking designated areas.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – October 6, 2020

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There were no surprises at this past week’s Town of Parry Sound council meeting. The resolutions and by-laws are summarized below.

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (Boundary negotiations);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (Contractor work on Town property);
f) advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose, (Contractor work on Town property)
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria, or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (Boundary negotiations, Wellness Centre & Pool cost sharing and site selection)

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry as to the installation status of the handrail at the hill just below the rail crossing on Cascade Street, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that indeed a railing was to be installed as part of the work on Cascade Street; staff is investigating to have the railing re-installed in a manner that supports pedestrian safety and will remain there during winter operations.

Correspondence
4.1 – Nathan Cato, Canadian Pacific.

CP 2020 Virtual Holiday Train.

4.2 – Danny Whalen, President, Federation of Northern Ontario Municipalities.
Media Release of support for satellite internet access.
Broadband Draft Resolution re Starlight satellite internet access.

4.3 – Graydon Smith, President, AMO.
Receipt of Feedback on AMO OPP Detachment Board Discussion Paper.

4.4 – Honourable Lisa Smith, Ministry of Government & Consumer Services.
Delegation at AMO Conference re: MNRF 7 Bay Street property disposition and subsequent retention of MNRF jobs in area.

4.5 – Downtown Business Association Beautification Committee.
Appreciation for Town Gardens 2020.

4.6 – Town of Amherstburg.
Request for deadline extension for AODA website compliance.

4.7 – Sean Finn, CN.
CN’s 100 Anniversary Celebrations and library donation.

All items of correspondence were filed.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Building Security Access Control System (FOBs).
Resolution
That Council accept the quote from Safe N Sound Locksmithing for the installation of security access controls (Fob system) for the Municipal Office in the amount of $18,290.00.
Carried

9.1.2 – Tender – Snow Removal.
Resolution

That Council accept the tender from Adams Brothers for snow removal on town streets during the 2020 fall & winter season and 2021 winter & spring season, including traffic control and labour costs to clear around infrastructure including tree pits and hydrants, as follows:
– Tandem dump truck: $95.99 per hour o Wheeled loader: $111.81 per hour.
– Blower and control unit: $111.81 per hour.
This tender being the only one received.
Carried

9.1.3 – Bobby Orr Community Centre – Reopening Informational Report.
Resolution

That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound receive the report attached as Schedule A on the reopening of the Bobby Orr Community Centre, for informational purposes.
Carried

9.2.1 – EMS Committee Member Appointment.
Resolution

That the Town of Parry Sound Council appoint Councillor Irene Smit representing the municipalities of Nipissing, Powassan and Callander to the Parry Sound EMS Advisory Committee for the remainder of the term of Council.
Carried

9.2.2 – BSM Breakwater and Dock C Replacement.
Resolution

That the Town of Parry Sound accept the bid by Kropf Industrial in the amount of $1,598,718 plus HST for the construction and delivery of a Floating Breakwater and replacement of Dock C per their tender submission; and
That a previously approved budget amount of $1,293,240 from the Big Sound Marina Reserve be used to fund this project; and
That an additional budget of $400,000 towards Dock C, contingency, HST, engineering and other provisional items be approved to be funded temporarily form the Capital Asset Legacy Reserve Fund; and
That the funds temporarily borrowed from the Capital Asset Legacy Reserve Fund be repaid over a 4-year term with interest, equivalent to the Town’s current interest on reserve fund bank accounts over the term, applied to the outstanding amount borrowed; and
That the repayment of the temporary borrowing begin in the 2021 budget year; and
That the total revised budget for this project be $1,693,240 including the Breakwater, provisional items, Dock C, contingency, and engineering costs.
Carried

9.2.3 – COVID 19 Impacts on Fall events.
Resolution

That Council receive the attached report on COVID Impacts on Fall Events for information purposes.
Carried

9.3.1 – Extension of Virtual Council Meetings.
Resolution
Whereas the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Act, 2020, S.O. 2020, c. 18 expanded the opportunity for Municipal Councils, Local Boards and their Committees to meet electronically, and
Whereas in response, Council passed By-law 2020 – 7061 permitting by means of a resolution, certain expanded terms of electronic participation at meetings of Council, Local Boards and its Committees; and
Whereas pursuant to By-law 2020-7061, Council extended by Resolution 2020-082 until October 31st expanded terms of electronic participation at meetings; and
Whereas recent provincial reports identify a current “second wave” of COVID-19 infections “worse than the first”, prompting a return to more stringent public health precautionary measures,
Now Therefore Be It Resolved that Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound extends until March 31, 2021 the terms of electronic participation at meetings of Council, Local Boards or Committees of either them per the following:
a) electronic participation counts towards quorum;
b) electronic participants are permitted to vote; and
c) electronic participation is permitted in a meeting closed to the public.
Carried

9.3.2 – COVID-19 Municipal Office Response Plan.
Resolution
That Council approves continued implementation of the internal safety protocol set out in the plans attached as Schedules A and B, and continued restriction on public access to the municipal office and Fire Hall until the end of the year 2020, at which time it will be reassessed.
Carried

9.3.3 – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
Resolution

That Council approve the Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.
Carried

9.3.4 – EDO for the West Parry Sound Economic Development Collaborative (CINNO Funding Program), 3 Year Employment Contract.
Resolution
That on behalf of the Regional Economic Development Collaborative, Council authorizes staff to enter into a 3-year fixed contract for a Regional Economic Development Officer provided that each member municipality agrees to cover their proportionate share of all employment related costs in the form, substantially as set out in this report.
Carried

9.5.1 – AODA Website Compliance Extension Request.
Resolution
Whereas the Town of Amherstburg passed Resolution 20200914-214 per attached Schedule A;
Now therefore be it resolved that the Town of Parry Sound hereby requests that the Province of Ontario extend the compliance deadline stated in Section 14(4) of O.Reg 191/11 under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act to require designated public sector organizations to conform to WCAG 2.0 Level AA, by a minimum of one (1) year to at least January 1, 2022; and further,
That the Town of Parry Sound requests that the Province of Ontario consider providing funding support and training resources to meet these compliance standards.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Technology Review – Municipal Modernization Program.

By-law 2020 – 7072
Being a bylaw to ratify the execution of a contract with Perry Group Consulting Ltd. to complete a technology review under the Municipal Modernization Program through the Ministry of Municipal Affairs & Housing.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.2.1 – Amend Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912 to prohibit parking on Waubeek Street.
By-law 2020 – 7075
Being a By-law to amend By-law 2019-6912 the Parking and Traffic Control By-law to prohibit parking on Waubeek Street.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.3.1 – Integrity Commissioner Appointment.
By-law 2020 – 7073
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with Harold Elston for re- appointment to the Office of the Integrity Commissioner.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.1 – Community Support Accessible Transport Services and Lease Agreement.
By-Law 2020 – 7074
Being a by-law to authorize the execution of an agreement substantially in the form provided as “Appendix A” with The Board of Management for the District of Parry Sound West Home for the Aged for the provision of accessible transportation.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

Council Agenda Preview – October 6, 2020

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There is lots on the agenda this week. I have highlighted below a few of the more interesting items with a little bit of commentary. Refer to the full list of agenda items that follows and the full agenda, with attachments that are available at the Town’s website.

Closed c) & d) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (Boundary negotiations).
This is something we haven’t heard anything about for the past year or more. There were discussions perhaps five years ago about the transfer of land to the Town of Parry Sound at the request of certain property owners who wanted to access the Town’s infrastructure. This was turned down by a majority of the landowners in the area, largely of the basis of projected higher taxes. Then about 18 months ago additional overtures were either made or received by the Town. I am not sure if these items are related or it is something altogether different. It’s obvious that the Greater Parry Sound area is attracting new residents and housing is in short supply. They will expect services, even if taxes are higher than the ‘burbs’.

4.4 – Honourable Lisa Smith, Ministry of Government & Consumer Services.
Delegation at AMO Conference re: MNRF 7 Bay Street property disposition and subsequent retention of MNRF jobs in area.
There is little to be read in the letter from the Minister. It seems to be a brush off, but that’s almost always how these discussions start. The Town would like to acquire the property but not lose the associated jobs. A get your cake and eat it too situation?

9.2.2 – BSM Breakwater and Dock C Replacement.
Remember the move the Money Pit about a young couple that buys a house and faces challenges and mostly expenses with the renovations? Well the town has three of them – the Bobby Orr Community Centre, the Stockey Centre and now Big Sound Marina. The property was received at no cost from the Federal Government along with $1.3 million for necessary repairs and upgrades. The Town is now tossing in another half million or so for additional upgrades. It seems that these three money pits are here to serve tourists and the neighbouring communities. Are we, the taxpayers who subsidize these facilities, getting our money’s worth? And there is the possibility of a fourth money pit, a ‘recreation and culture centre’ (aka a pool). Can we really afford all of this without more land to provide additional taxable property income?

9.3.3 – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan
Resolutions.
I am putting this on my to-do list to review. A quick glance reveals a limited number of objectives with few details. Less is okay if they actually get done and aren’t dragged over from year to year.

10.2.1 – Amend Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912 to prohibit parking on Waubeek Street.
This is good news. Last week saw a letter and deputation to Council requesting Waubeek on street parking. I drove down Waubeek at night last week and was surprised how relatively narrow the street was. What happens in the winter? Well, Council is being presented with a by law amendment that prohibits parking on Waubeek Street. That seems to be the right things to do.
As an aside – is anyone else surprised with how ‘bumpy’ Waubeek Street is after the rebuild and repaving? There are two issues in my opinion. Didn’t we pay lots to get this work done? Is this type of quality we paid for? The second concerns the durability of the street. A ‘bumpy’ rebuild and paving is more than a bit of a rougher ride, it suggests that the road won’t last as long. Erosion and wear start more easily from bumps and depressions. Ever notice how a pothole grows quickly once it has first formed. The small imperfections in the Waubeek Street job will lead to issues sooner than they should have. Compare this with the repaving done on Highway 400 and the exit ramps to the Town. Smooooth! Very smooth! They don’t want to be doing this any sooner than they need to.

Town of Parry Sound Agenda 2020-10-06

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (Boundary negotiations)
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (Contractor work on Town property);
f) advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose, (Contractor work on Town property)
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria, or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (Boundary negotiations)

Correspondence
4.1 – Nathan Cato, Canadian Pacific.

CP 2020 Virtual Holiday Train

4.2 – Danny Whalen, President, Federation of Northern Ontario Municipalities. Media Release of support for satellite internet access.
Broadband Draft Resolution re. Starlight satellite internet access

4.3 – Graydon Smith, President, AMO.
Receipt of Feedback on AMO OPP Detachment Board Discussion Paper.

4.4 – Honourable Lisa Smith, Ministry of Government & Consumer Services.
Delegation at AMO Conference re: MNRF 7 Bay Street property disposition and subsequent retention of MNRF jobs in area.

4.5 – Downtown Business Association Beautification Committee.
Appreciation for Town Gardens 2020.

4.6 – Town of Amherstburg.
Request for deadline extension for AODA website compliance.

4.7 – Sean Finn, CN.
CN’s 100 Anniversary Celebrations and library donation.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Building Security Access Control System (FOBs)

Resolution
That Council accept the quote from Safe N Sound Locksmithing for the installation of security access controls (Fob system) for the Municipal Office in the amount of $18,290.00.

9.1.2 – Tender – Snow Removal
Resolution
That Council accept the tender from Adams Brothers for snow removal on town streets during the 2020 fall & winter season and 2021 winter & spring season, including traffic control and labour costs to clear around infrastructure including tree pits and hydrants, as follows:
– Tandem dump truck: $95.99 per hour
– Wheeled loader: $111.81 per hour
– Blower and control unit: $111.81 per hour
This tender being the only one received.

9.1.3 – Bobby Orr Community Centre – Reopening Informational Report.
Resolution
That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound receive the report attached as Schedule A on the reopening of the Bobby Orr Community Centre, for informational purposes.

9.2.1 – EMS Committee Member Appointment.
Resolution
That the Town of Parry Sound Council appoint Councillor Irene Smit representing the municipalities of Nipissing, Powassan and Callander to the Parry Sound EMS Advisory Committee for the remainder of the term of Council.

9.2.2 – BSM Breakwater and Dock C Replacement.
Resolution
That the Town of Parry Sound accept the bid by Kropf Industrial in the amount of $1,598,718 plus HST for the construction and delivery of a Floating Breakwater and replacement of Dock C per their tender submission; and
That a previously approved budget amount of $1,293,240 from the Big Sound Marina Reserve be used to fund this project; and
That an additional budget of $400,000 towards Dock C, contingency, HST, engineering and other provisional items be approved to be funded temporarily form the Capital Asset Legacy Reserve Fund; and
That the funds temporarily borrowed from the Capital Asset Legacy Reserve Fund be repaid over a 4-year term with interest, equivalent to the Town’s current interest on reserve fund bank accounts over the term, applied to the outstanding amount borrowed; and
That the repayment of the temporary borrowing begin in the 2021 budget year; and
That the total revised budget for this project be $1,693,240 including the Breakwater, provisional items, Dock C, contingency, and engineering costs.

9.2.3 – COVID 19 Impacts on Fall events
Resolution
That Council receive the attached report on COVID Impacts on Fall Events for information purposes.

9.3.1 – Extension of Virtual Council Meetings
Resolution
Whereas the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Act, 2020, S.O. 2020, c. 18 expanded the opportunity for Municipal Councils, Local Boards and their Committees to meet electronically, and
Whereas in response, Council passed By-law 2020 – 7061 permitting by means of a resolution, certain expanded terms of electronic participation at meetings of Council, Local Boards and its Committees; and
Whereas pursuant to By-law 2020-7061, Council extended by Resolution 2020-082 until October 31st expanded terms of electronic participation at meetings; and
Whereas recent provincial reports identify a current “second wave” of COVID-19 infections “worse than the first”, prompting a return to more stringent public health precautionary measures,
Now Therefore Be It Resolved that Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound extends until March 31, 2021 the terms of electronic participation at meetings of Council, Local Boards or Committees of either them per the following:
a) electronic participation counts towards quorum;
b) electronic participants are permitted to vote; and
c) electronic participation is permitted in a meeting closed to the public.

9.3.2 – COVID-19 Municipal Office Response Plan.
Resolution
That Council approves continued implementation of the internal safety protocol set out in the plans attached as Schedules A and B, and continued restriction on public access to the municipal office and Fire Hall until the end of the year 2020, at which time it will be reassessed.

9.3.3 – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan
Resolutions.
That Council approve the Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.

9.3.4 – EDO for the West Parry Sound Economic Development Collaborative (CINNO Funding Program), 3 Year Employment Contract.
Resolution 2020
That on behalf of the Regional Economic Development Collaborative, Council authorizes staff to enter into a 3-year fixed contract for a Regional Economic Development Officer provided that each member municipality agrees to cover their proportionate share of all employment related costs in the form, substantially as set out in this report.

9.5.1 – AODA Website Compliance Extension Request.
Resolution
Whereas the Town of Amherstburg passed Resolution 20200914-214 per attached Schedule A;
Now therefore be it resolved that the Town of Parry Sound hereby requests that the Province of Ontario extend the compliance deadline stated in Section 14(4) of O. Reg 191/11 under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act to require designated public sector organizations to conform to WCAG 2.0 Level AA, by a minimum of one (1) year to at least January 1, 2022; and further,
That the Town of Parry Sound requests that the Province of Ontario consider providing funding support and training resources to meet these compliance standards.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Technology Review – Municipal Modernization Program.

By-law 2020 – 7072
Being a bylaw to ratify the execution of a contract with Perry Group Consulting Ltd. to complete a technology review under the Municipal Modernization Program through the Ministry of Affairs & Housing.

10.2.1 – Amend Parking and Traffic Control By-law 2019-6912 to prohibit parking on Waubeek Street.
By-law 2020 – 7075
Being a By-law to amend By-law 2019-6912 the Parking and Traffic Control By-law to prohibit parking on Waubeek Street.

10.3.1 – Integrity Commissioner Appointment.
By-law 2020 – 7073
Being a By-law to appoint and authorize the execution of an agreement with Harold Elston for Integrity Commissioner Services.

10.4.1 – Community Support Accessible Transport Services and Lease Agreement.
By-Law 2020 – 7074
Being a by-law to authorize the execution of an agreement substantially in the form provided as “Appendix A” with The Board of Management for the District of Parry Sound West Home for the Aged for the provision of accessible transportation.