Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – February 16, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

Thankfully the COVID-19 lockdown will be slowly lifted in Parry Sound on Monday. It would be nice if part of the lifting of the recreational restrictions included opening the tower on Tower Hill. It’s been a year folks! The Tower was a major resource for folks trying to get in a little bit of cardiovascular exercise. Do it right and you have the perfect H.I.I.T (High Intensity Interval Training) ‘machine’.

3.2.2 is not good news for the Town. There was a possibility that the Town would receive some level of reimbursement for the services consumed by the numerous public housing units in the Town of Parry Sound. But, it was shot down by the Board of DSSAB that includes municipal representatives, who understood reimbursing the Town of Parry Sound would mean their DSSAB payments would increase. I have a sense that the area municipalities are getting a little bit ‘nasty’ when it comes to taking on any additional expenses, or even paying for what they had previously committed themselves to. They are quite happy for the Town of Parry Sound taxpayers to carry most of the ‘overheard’ expenses for social services that are provided to their residents. It’s a great deal if you can get away with it. Note to our neighbours – chipping in a little more now is much cheaper than giving the Province a good reason to force amalgamation. I have estimated the property tax implications; it works for me.

Letters 4.7. & 4.8 seem to have triggered a bit of conscience on the part of Council who have included consideration of a $20,000 expense in the 2021 Budget for repair of the Sunset Trail section of the Rotary Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail. There is of course no guarantee that the amount will be approved. I will remind folks that this has been a problem for more than five years, the same period in which the Town has spent almost $200,000 to repair boat launches primarily for the benefit of visitors.

Council Minutes (Abridged)

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (Proposed property exchange);
d) labour relations or employee negotiations (Director level salaries). Carried

Presentations:
Prior to the Agenda, Mayor McGarvey addressed Council and the public with concerns about the recent decision by the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit to continue the COVID-19 lock-down designation and Stay at Home order. Mayor McGarvey expressed concerns over the lock-down designation of such a large area, and the lack of advance communication to local leadership to help prepare them for implementation. Mayor McGarvey concluded with notice that two resolutions have been drafted for consideration at this meeting: requesting the Health Unit provide more pro-active communication regarding announcements; and that statistics on confirmed cases be provided for the West Parry Sound Area, distinct from the east side of the District. Mayor McGarvey then introduced Jim Hanna, Public Relations and Communications Officer of the West Parry Sound Health Centre.
Mr. Hanna read from a statement issued today by the Health Centre which expressed support for the Ontario Hospital Association’s calls for “discipline and ruthlessness” in the shared fight against COVID-19 and asked that individuals continue to practice COVID-19 transmission prevention measures.
Mr. Hanna commented that Health Centre leadership was taken by surprise by the continued lock-down announcement; that the local Health District was the only one lumped into the grey lockdown category along with the GTA after all others were lifted from lockdown to some other less restrictive category. Mr. Hanna noted that a patchwork approach won’t benefit the province and that if people don’t understand the reason for a health zone being categorized as it is, they don’t buy into it.
Upon conclusion of Mr. Hanna’s comments, Mayor McGarvey introduced two resolutions under items 9.5.2 and 9.5.3 of the minutes. Upon carriage of those two resolutions, Clerk Rebecca Johnson read from a press release provided just prior to the meeting from the Parry Sound Rotary Club advising that Rotary Club is providing disposable masks free of charge to businesses that would like them.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
Councillor Borneman inquired as to the impact on Town staffing, operations and recreation programs if the current COVID-19 lock-down order is extended or shifted to any other designation but “green”. Director of Public Works Mike Kearns responded that a red zone designation, which might be the next transition out of lock-down, affects programming, as the Ontario Minor Hockey Association will permit training practices limited to 10 people on-ice but does not permit play. Mr. Kearns noted that ice typically comes out the end of March, and that proposals to extend the season would also impact other issues as staff then transition to outdoor maintenance activities. Mr. Kearns listed area municipalities which either did not install ice this season or have now removed it. Mr. Kearns also noted that the building is energy intensive with energy costs based on peak 24-hour demand.

3.2.2 – Councillor Borneman reported on his understanding of the past process of tax billing and payment for non-profit housing units which have subsequently been declared tax exempt. Non-profit housing passed on the bills to District Social Services Administration Board which secured funding from senior levels to pay the Town. Since declaration of the tax-exempt status, and DSSAB’s defeat of a resolution requesting that they continue to pay the taxes, Councillor Borneman suggested there should be an accounting of the funding secured from senior levels of government and the following motion was made:
Direction/Resolution(?)
That the Town send a letter to Chair of DSSAB to ask for an accounting of funding sources through senior levels of government designated for non-profit housing taxes with a reply provided as soon as possible due to spring budget preparations.
Carried

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding plowed snow preventing access to Big Sound Marine, Mr. Kearns responded that this is normal practice, and that it may be helpful to prevent people from accessing the area which is not maintained in winter.

Correspondence
4.1 – Lynne Atkinson, Executive Director, West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation.

Appreciation for $50,000 donation from BOHF Reserve Fund towards x-ray system.
Filed

4.2 – Lynne Atkinson, Executive Director, West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation.
Appreciation for $50,000 donation from BOHF Reserve Fund towards renewing dining room area of Lakeland Long Term Care.
Filed
4.3 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.
Approval of Parry Sound’s request for removal from Planning Board contingent upon Carling receiving same approval.
Filed

4.4 – Nicole Dimond, Project Coordinator, Georgian Bay Forever.
Follow-up to questions asked following February 2, 2021 deputation to Council.
Filed
4.5 – Craig Jeffery, Clerk, Township of Seguin.
Notice of Public Meeting for proposed Zoning By-law Amendment to permit cannabis grow operations in industrial zones.
Filed

4.6 – Jane Wang, Communication Officer, Census Communications.
Promotion of May 2021 Census.
See item 9.5.1

4.7 – Jo Bossart.
Concerns with erosion on the Rotary & The Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail.

4.8 – Larry Woolner, Vice President, Sail Parry Sound.
Current projects and funding request.

Items 4.7 and 4.8 were circulated to Council, and Directors of Public Works, and Finance for follow-up. Upon confirming no objection from Council, Mayor McGarvey directed that the $20,000 request in the Sail Parry Sound letter for Sunset Trail remediation be referred to Council’s 2021 budget considerations.

Deputations
5.1 – Christy Cafovski, Executive Director, Chamber of Commerce.

Chamber of Commerce Year in Review, new Strategic Plan.
Withdrawn

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.4.1 – Non-Union Compensation Grid.

Resolution
That Council authorize a pre-budget expenditure related to the procurement of professional services of a compensation consulting firm for non-union job evaluation.
Carried

9.4.2 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
Resolution
That Council approve the progress report on the Town’s Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.
Carried
In response to a Councillor request, CAO Clayton Harris confirmed that they would publish the KPOs on the Town website.

9.5.1 – Promotion of May 2021 Census.
Resolution

Whereas accurate and complete census data support programs and services that benefit our community;
Now Therefore the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound supports the 2021 Census and encourages all residents to complete their census questionnaire online. Link
Carried

9.5.2 – Request that Health Unit be Proactive in Communication on COVID-19. Resolution
Whereas there is a willingness in the community to support directives from the Province and the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit; and
Whereas the North Bay Parry Sound Health District was a Green Zone prior to the Stay- at-Home Order; and
Whereas the more restrictive the directives, the greater the financial burden on businesses and individuals in the community; and
Whereas the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit has taken a more restrictive approach than many District Health Units in Ontario by extending the Stay-at-Home Order until at least February 22, 2021; and
Whereas the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit has also taken a very restrictive approach by ordering all public ice rinks, tobogganing hills, skating trails, and Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs’ (OFSC) trails and trails utilizing Crown Land in the health unit district to be closed; and
Whereas community understanding and support is critical to achieving the objective of the directives – slowing the spread of the virus; and
Whereas the conditions in the North Bay Parry Sound Health District do not appear to be dissimilar to the conditions in many other Ontario health districts; and
Whereas variants of the virus have been confirmed in other Ontario Health Districts and the Stay-at-Home Order has been lifted; and
Whereas a greater community awareness generates greater community support; and
Whereas the Parry Sound Town Council has no authority with respect to Provincial and Health Unit directives;
NOW THEREFORE the Council of the Town of Parry Sound requests that the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit take a more pro-active approach to community outreach and communication through a range of communication techniques; and
That increased communication include greater dialogue with municipal and healthcare leaders across the health district in advance of announcements; and
That this resolution be forwarded to the Mayors and healthcare leaders within the health district, Norm Miller, MPP for Parry Sound-Muskoka and the Honourable Victor Fedeli, MPP Nipissing.
Carried

9.5.3 – Request that Health Unit Publish COVID-19 Statistics for West Parry Sound.
Resolution
Whereas in order to fight the COVID-19 virus in a community it is important to understand the status of confirmed cases in that community; and
Whereas the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit represents a very large geographic area; and
Whereas the catchment area of West Parry Sound is only a portion of the area served by North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit; and
Whereas the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit publishes and provides opioid overdose statistics to the municipal level which demonstrates the Health Unit’s ability to provide health related information without breaking confidentiality issues; and
Whereas the flow of individuals and commerce tends to follow a north/south pattern, rather than an east/west pattern;
Now therefore the Council of the Town of Parry Sound requests that the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit publish statistics that provide the number of confirmed cases and other appropriate information for West Parry Sound; and
Further That this resolution be sent to municipalities in the West Parry Sound Area; the West Parry Sound Health Centre; the Honourable Minister Christine Elliott, Minister of Health; and MPP Norm Miller.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Approval of Funding Agreement – Provincial Gas Tax for Public Transportation.

By-law 2021 – 7106
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a Letter of Agreement with the Ontario Minister of Transportation regarding funding under the Dedicated Gas Tax Funds for Public Transportation Program.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.3.1 – Appoint Plans Examiner/Building Inspector.
By-law 2021 – 7105
Being a by-law to appoint Nicholas Deroy as a Plans Examiner/Building Inspector.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

Council Agenda Preview – February 16, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , ,

There are a few interesting items on the agenda:

Commentary
4.3 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling. Approval of Parry Sound’s request for removal from Planning Board contingent upon Carling receiving same approval.
This is a little bit ‘cheeky’. Carling is happy to support the Town of Parry Sound’s request to be excused from the Parry Sound Area Planning Board oversight if Carling can also be excused from the same oversight requirements. It seems that the area municipalities in general are not too enamoured with the Parry Sound Area Planning Board.

Closed Session d) and 9.4.1 – Non-Union Compensation Grid.
Compensation packages are on the table for discussion. In neither case do I imagine that the review will suggest a drop in compensation. I’m okay with it if they are earning their packages. I am more interested in a better understanding of performance and ensuring it is aligned with compensation. But of course, individual performance is confidential and not subject to public disclosure.

9.4.2 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
I will need to study this more closely going forward. As much as the Town likes to lay out its plans, these are generally non-specific documents often just presentations, that contain little real information on strategy, tactics and objectives. Many of the statements are more aspirational than something Staff can be held to account for. I’ll do some sort of a post on the Key Performance Objectives document with commentary.

4.5 – Craig Jeffery, Clerk, Township of Seguin. Notice of Public Meeting for proposed Zoning By-law Amendment to permit cannabis grow operations in industrial zones.
Question: Is this considered light or heavy industry?
Answer: It’s heavy man – real heavy;-)

4.7 – Jo Bossart. Concerns with erosion on the Rotary & The Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail.
I sent a letter to Council requesting information on the Town’s plans with respect to remediating erosion along the waterfront, especially at Sail Parry Sound which is a Town owned property.

ABRIDGED AGENA

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board, (Proposed property exchange);
d) labour relations or employee negotiations (Director level salaries).

Correspondence
4.1 – Lynne Atkinson, Executive Director, West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation.

Appreciation for $50,000 donation from BOHF Reserve Fund towards x-ray system.

4.2 – Lynne Atkinson, Executive Director, West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation.
Appreciation for $50,000 donation from BOHF Reserve Fund towards renewing dining room area of Lakeland Long Term Care.

4.3 – Mackenzie Taylor, Deputy Clerk, Township of Carling.
Approval of Parry Sound’s request for removal from Planning Board contingent upon Carling receiving same approval.

4.4 – Nicole Dimond, Project Coordinator, Georgian Bay Forever.
Follow-up to questions asked following February 2, 2021 deputation to Council.

4.5 – Craig Jeffery, Clerk, Township of Seguin.
Notice of Public Meeting for proposed Zoning By-law Amendment to permit cannabis grow operations in industrial zones.

4.6 – Jane Wang, Communication Officer, Census Communications.
Promotion of May, 2021 Census.

4.7 – Jo Bossart.
Concerns with erosion on the Rotary & The Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail.

Deputations
5.1 – Christy Cafovski, Executive Director, Chamber of Commerce.

Chamber of Commerce Year in Review, new Strategic Plan.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.4.1 – Non-Union Compensation Grid.
Resolution

That Council authorize a pre-budget expenditure related to the procurement of professional services of a compensation consulting firm for non-union job evaluation.

9.4.2 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
Resolution

That Council approve the progress report on the Town’s Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.

9.5.1 – Promotion of May, 2021 Census.
Resolution

Whereas accurate and complete census data support programs and services that benefit our community;
Now Therefore the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound supports the 2021 Census, and encourages all residents to complete their census questionnaire online at https://link.edgepilot.com/s/ae524374/JNWCCJEa1kmOGFUP2SdHAA?u=http://www.c ensus.gc.ca/.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Approval of Funding Agreement – Provincial Gas Tax for Public Transportation.
By-law 2021 – 7106
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of a Letter of Agreement with the Ontario Minister of Transportation regarding funding under the Dedicated Gas Tax Funds for Public Transportation Program.

10.3.1 – Appoint Plans Examiner/Building Inspector.
By-law 2021 – 7105
Being a by-law to appoint Nicholas Deroy as a Plans Examiner/Building Inspector.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – February 2, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

There were no surprises with respect to the decisions made by Council. It is always worth taking a quick look at the abridged minutes below in case something catches your attention.

Town of Parry Sound Council Meeting (Abridged)

Additions to Agenda/Notice of Motion
1.1.1 – Deputation: Michelle Ogilvie, Dogs ‘n Dos – re: Pet Grooming as an Essential Service

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding water main repairs on Cedar Street, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns confirmed that specific work dealing with 1950s cast iron pipes is being addressed in problematic areas, in the context of attempts to deal more systematically and holistically with infrastructure work in Town.

3.2.2 – In response to Cllr. Keith’s request for an update on the Cascade St railing to be installed, noting that the bottom half of the sidewalk is quite treacherous, Mr. Kearns reported that the freeze-thaw cycles have made for icy conditions there. During recent extreme cold, salt applied there became ineffective and staff have returned to apply more material.

3.2.3 – In response to Cllr Borneman’s inquiry regarding concerns circulating in the community questioning the estimated operational costs of the proposed Recreational Centre, CAO Clayton Harris confirmed that the concerns have been provided to consulting architects CS&P who prepared the pro formas in conjunction with the YMCA. The closest facility that approximates the programming envisioned for the West Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre is Gravenhurst, and the YMCA as operators of that facility with access to information that others might not, are tasked with and are well underway in reviewing this issue with CS&P.

3.2.4 – In response to Councillor Backman’s request for an update on funding applied for through Transport Canada regarding rail safety, Mr. Kearns reported that he has not yet heard anything back and will follow-up, as there is a lot of traffic in the particular area on Isabella Street at the double tracks.

Correspondence
4.1 – Krista St. Amant, on behalf of community members.
Request that ice remain in BOCC to resume programs after lock-down.
Filed

4.2 – Parry Sound District Social Services Administration Board.
Response to Town’s request to pay property taxes on social housing.
Filed

4.3 – Chris McConnell, President OPSEU Local 317.
Call for lobby efforts to reject the plan to close the Ontario Fire College.
Dealt with under item 9.5.1

Deputations
5.1 – ED David Sweetnam, Nicole Dimond, Brooke Harrison, Georgian Bay Forever.

Divert & Capture Program Update; Introducing Diversion 2.0.
Nicole Dimond, Project Coordinator with the Diversion 2.0 Program addressed Council with Georgian Bay Forever’s mission, and introduced Brooke Harrison, Project Coordinator for Divert and Capture – the fight to keep microplastics out of our water. Ms. Harrison reported on preliminary findings of the project to divert synthetic textile microplastics/microfibres from entering the water system through the installation in 2019 of filters on 100 washing machines in Parry Sound. With approximately 1000 homes in Parry Sound, Ms. Dimond reported an expected decrease of microfibres by 10% which is exactly what preliminary findings show. Microfibres were reduced by 4.5 fibres per litre. With 3 million litres entering the Bay every day, a reduction of even 1 fibre per litre would represent a reduction of 3 million microfibres per day.
Ms. Dimond introduced the Diversion 2.0 program, noting that 10 million kg of plastic pollution enter the Great Lakes every year from washing machines, littering, open storm drains, blowing garbage and breakdown of in-water products such as dock foam. GBF tactics to divert this pollution include the use of in-water seabin devices, gutter bins (installed at drain openings), and trash traps (installed at storm water outlets). Seven seabins, eight gutter bins and three trash traps will be installed across Georgian Bay this year.
Ms. Dimond invited Parry Sound to partner with GBF by installing one seabin, and one to two trash traps through a $3,200 purchase investment of the seabin and commitment to routinely dump collected refuse from both/all receptacles as well as enter data on trash collected. Data collected helps further public education on mitigation efforts and supports policy change, such as MPP Norm Miller’s Private Member’s Bill 228 which seeks to ban the sale of dock foam; unencapsulated dock foam is the largest source of lake water pollution. In addition, Ms. Dimond requested a $5,000 investment in plastic litter mitigation to support continued public education, for a total request of $8,200.
Ms. Harrison and Ms. Dimond responded to Councillor inquiries with the following: – alternatives to dock foam include steel pipe and thick plastic tubes;
– analysis of the amount of glass in sea bins will help determine whether glass fragments found along shorelines are on-shore remnants or are washed up from the water;
– seabins ideally should be emptied daily; response on the lifespan of a seabin will be forwarded;
– because of the usually tiny size of the litter collected in each of the receptacles, and inability to efficiently separate it into recyclables, the refuse should be deposited as garbage in trash receptacles for proper disposal;
– seabins will collect COVID-19 pandemic PPE such as facemasks which are not recyclable; public education will continue to recommend disposal of these items in the trash.
The Mayor received no objection to his suggested direction, and it was therefore carried: That GBF’s financial request of $8,200 be referred to the 2021 budget for consideration.

5.1 – Michelle Ogilvie, Owner/Operator of Dogs ‘n Dos.
Request for support of pet groomers as an essential service during COVID-19 lockdown orders.
Ms. Ogilvie provided information to Council with respect to regular pet grooming, citing the potential health hazards to dogs if issues such as matted, long hair and long nails/claws are not attended to. Ms. Ogilvie also reported on the safety measures that she and other groomers have undertaken since the onset of COVID-19, making the transaction virtually contact-less, one appointment at a time, supported by thorough sanitization between appointments.
Ms. Ogilvie noted that some other regions are permitting pet groomers to stay open with curbside pick-up and drop-off and that by-law officers in those regions have been told that tickets will not be given to groomers until there is a clear answer given from the provincial government. Ms. Ogilvie asked if the Town could follow suit and allow pet groomers to open and continue to operate safely.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – COVID-19 Pandemic – Property Tax Support for Taxpayers.
Resolution

Whereas on January 12, 2021, the Province of Ontario once again issued a State of Emergency order; and
Whereas the Province has ordered non-essential businesses to close to the public during this time; and
Whereas fewer businesses were deemed non-essential under this newest order allowing more businesses to carry on their business and keep their employees working; and
Whereas there should be an incentive for property owners to continue to pay their property taxes and not encumber their property into the future; and
Whereas property taxes are the Town’s primary source of revenue and it is important to encourage payment to maintain sufficient municipal cashflows to fund operations and meet the Town’s payment obligations; and
Whereas the Province of Ontario currently makes small business support grants available to businesses and these programs include property taxation and energy rebates; and
Whereas not all taxpayers are unable to pay their property taxes;
Therefore, given the Provincial financial assistance program for small businesses, staff be directed to work with those taxpayers having difficulty paying their taxes, including developing payment plans as an alternative to an across-the-board waiving of penalty or interest on tax and water/sewer accounts in 2021.
Carried

9.1.2 – 2021 Budgeting Schedule (Revised).
Resolution

That Council hereby approves the Revised 2021 Budgeting Schedule as set out in the attached Schedule “A”; and
That the Special Budget Meeting scheduled for February 9th, 2021 is hereby cancelled; and, That Resolution 2020-122 is hereby revoked.
Carried

9.2.1 – Pre-budget Council expenditure approval – Computer Hardware.
Resolution

That Council authorize a pre-budget expenditure related to the procurement of computer hardware equipment and devices.
Carried

9.2.2a – Pre-budget Council expenditure approval – Water/Wastewater capacity study.
Resolution

That Council authorize a pre-budget expenditure related to the procurement of professional services to assess water and wastewater servicing/capacity and develop computer models for these systems.
Carried

9.2.2b – Sole Source Award to Tatham Engineering for Water & Wastewater Servicing Capacity Studies.
Resolution

Whereas the Town is receiving a number of development inquiries and it is therefore important to undertake water and wastewater capacity studies as soon as possible;
Whereas the Town’s Procurement Policy provides for sole-sourcing;
Whereas Tatham Engineering is a well recognized engineering firm providing services in the municipal and private sectors;
Whereas Tatham Engineering has significant experience with municipal infrastructure projects and has gained knowledge and an understanding regarding the Town’s infrastructure through involvement in various projects over the years;
Whereas Tatham Engineering has proven capable of delivering quality services and products in a timely manner and has become familiar with the Town’s current circumstances related to both water and wastewater challenges;
Now therefore Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby authorizes the sole source purchase of services from Tatham Engineering related to the development of Water and Wastewater servicing capacity studies in accordance with the Municipal Purchasing Policy.
Carried

9.3.1 – EMS Paramedic Response Unit Capital Purchase.
Resolution

That Council for the Town of Parry Sound authorize the purchase of two Ambulances from Crestline in the amount of $152,957 + HST, and
That Council approve the purchase of one Paramedic Response Unit from Rowland Emergency Vehicles in the amount of $71,219.00 + HST; and
That said units to be funded from the EMS Capital Reserve Fund.
Carried

9.4.1 – 2020 Economic Development Report, and;
Introduction of Regional Economic Development Officer James Cox.
Resolution

EDO Vlad Shehovtsov addressed Council from a prepared presentation, identifying 2020 economic development activity including COVID-19 and Local Business Support; Cruise Industry; Film Industry; Investment Attraction Projects, and Key Goals for 2021. The presentation is available as part of the Council agenda.
After concluding his presentation, Mr. Shehovtsov introduced James Cox, recently appointed Regional Economic Development Officer with the West Parry Sound Economic Development Collaborative (WPSEDC), a partnership of the seven area municipalities. Mr. Cox addressed Council with a brief update on the direction of the WPSEDC, with its specific mandate to build West Parry Sound as a region, complementing local work as identified by Mr. Shehovtsov in his presentation. Current focus of the WPSEDC is on business retention and expansion with outreach to area businesses to assist not only in recovery from the pandemic, but to understand specific challenges in doing business, and thereby seeking to take steps to remove those challenges and build a long term strategy for economic development. Mr. Cox reported that other work priorities include making the region development-ready and improving engagement between the WPSEDC and municipalities, and that he expected to report on a semi-regular basis to Council.
Resolution
That the 2020 Economic Development Report attached as Schedule A be received for information purposes.
Carried

9.5.1 – Support to Keep Ontario Fire College Open.
Resolution

WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College has been in existence since 1949; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College is one of the primary sources of certified training for Ontario Firefighters; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College has built a reputation of integrity, credibility, and reliability in providing some of the best training to our Fire Services within the Province of Ontario; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College has been used to train and certify both Volunteer, Part-Time and Career firefighters throughout Ontario; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College gives Ontario Firefighters another option other than Regional Training Centers to obtain National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) certifications; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College is the most cost-effective method to certify Firefighters to NFPA Standards in Ontario; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Government enacted and revoked 0. Reg. 379/18: Firefighter Certification in 2018; and
WHEREAS when the Ontario Government revoked 0. Reg. 379/18: Firefighter Certification, it was made known by the Office of the Solicitor General that the act would be amended and brought back in the future;

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Town of Parry Sound requests that the Province of Ontario reverse their decision to close the Ontario Fire College as the OFC is one of the best and most cost-effective methods for municipalities to train their firefighters which assists us in protecting our residents; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT this Resolution is forwarded to the Honourable Doug Ford, Premier of Ontario; the Honourable Sylvia Jones, Ontario Solicitor General; Norm Miller, Member for Parry Sound Muskoka; the Ontario Fire Marshal, Jon Pegg; District of Parry Sound municipalities, ROMA, OSUM and AMO.
Carried

9.5.2 – Support for Pet Grooming to be Declared an Essential Service.
Resolution

That Whereas pet grooming is important to the health and welfare of these animals, and
Whereas pet grooming businesses have adapted best practices during the COVID pandemic, developing high standards of health and safety, and making their businesses contact-less;
Now Therefore the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound authorises the Mayor to send a letter to the Ontario Chief Medical Officer of Health, with a copy to the local North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit requesting that pet grooming be deemed an essential service, for purposes of enabling pet grooming businesses to stay open during the current Stay-At-Home Order.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Appointment of Deputy Treasurer.
By-Law: 2021 – 7101
Being a By-law to Appoint Suzanne Diller as Deputy-Treasurer for the Town of Parry Sound.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.3.1 – Amendment to the Fees & Service Charges By-law 2010-5408.
By-law 2021 – 7102
Being a By-law to amend the Fees & Service Charges By-law 2010-5408 to include an Appeal Fee, Property Standards and Clean Yards Administrative Fee, Planning Fee and Cost Recovery for Damage to Municipal Property by Motor Vehicle Accident Fee.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.1 – Lakeland Holdings Shareholders Agreement Amendments.
By-law 2021 – 7103
Being a by-law to authorize the execution of Lakeland Holding Ltd. Amended Shareholders’ Agreement, substantially in the form attached as Schedule A.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

 

Council Agenda Preview – February 2, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Well, well some good news in this week’s Town of Parry Sound’s council agenda in terms of Item 4.2.

4.2 – Parry Sound District Social Services Administration Board. Response to Town’s request to pay property taxes on social housing.
It seems that the Parry Sound District Social Services Administration Board has approved the payment of an amount equivalent to the property taxes that would be owed on a number of properties supported by the Parry Sound District Social Services Administration Board. The amount to be paid appears to be significant but I will refrain from providing an amount. I am sure this will a major the subject of discussion Tuesday night. I offer my congratulations and thanks to Town Staff for pushing this issue.

9.1.2 – 2021 Budgeting Schedule (Revised).
A revised and delayed schedule has been proposed. It pushes final budget approval back to April. It is not clear from the information provided when the Public will be able to access the draft budget to permit some analysis and feedback.

9.2.2 – Pre-budget Council expenditure approval – Water/Wastewater capacity study.
This is interesting and acknowledges that the Town doesn’t have a handle on the future water and wastewater needs of the Town. Better late than never. There certainly will be much more demand than forecast in the recent Water Report. The needs could explode if Acorn Ridge were to be realized and the properties on Emily Street with fabulous views of the waterfront and the setting sun were to move forward. There is also the possibility of serious waterfront development. Put it all together and supply will exceed demand if it hasn’t already. Parry Sound is becoming a mid-market destination and not to be compared with Muskoka. It would be nice to have a handle on what that might mean for Town infrastructure demands.

9.4.1 – 2020 Economic Development Report
According to the recent Water Report future economic development in the Town will not increase water use. It was obvious that this estimate was wrong, but it will be nice to understand what Town Staff is thinking and planning in terms of economic development.
Note – there was no presentation attached with the minutes as noted in the agenda.

10.4.1 – Lakeland Holdings Shareholders Agreement Amendments.
I really don’t have much to offer from a contract perspective. What is interesting is the summary of ownership of Lakeland Holdings and the various generators and business sectors they are involved in. I have pasted two tables from the Agenda at the end if you are interested in this information.

Abridged Agenda

Correspondence
4.1 – Krista St. Amant, on behalf of community members.

Request that ice remain in BOCC to resume programs after lock-down.

4.2 – Parry Sound District Social Services Administration Board.
Response to Town’s request to pay property taxes on social housing.

Deputations
5.1 – ED David Sweetnam, Nicole Dimond, Brooke Harrison, Georgian Bay Forever.
Divert & Capture Program Update; Introducing Diversion 2.0.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – COVID-19 Pandemic – Property Tax Support for Taxpayers.

Resolution
Whereas on January 12, 2021, the Province of Ontario once again issued a State of Emergency order; and
Whereas the Province has ordered non-essential businesses to close to the public during this time; and
Whereas fewer businesses were deemed non-essential under this newest order allowing more businesses to carry on their business and keep their employees working; and
Whereas there should be an incentive for property owners to continue to pay their property taxes and not encumber their property into the future; and
Whereas property taxes are the Town’s primary source of revenue and it is important to encourage payment to maintain sufficient municipal cashflows to fund operations and meet the Town’s payment obligations; and
Whereas the Province of Ontario currently makes small business support grants available to businesses and these programs include property taxation and energy rebates; and
Whereas not all taxpayers are unable to pay their property taxes;
Therefore, given the Provincial financial assistance program for small businesses, staff be directed to work with those taxpayers having difficulty paying their taxes, including developing payment plans as an alternative to an across the board waiving of penalty or interest on tax and water/sewer accounts in 2021.

9.1.2 – 2021 Budgeting Schedule (Revised).
Resolution

That Council hereby approves the Revised 2021 Budgeting Schedule as set out in the attached Schedule “A”; and
That the Special Budget Meeting scheduled for February 9th, 2021 is hereby cancelled; and,
That Resolution 2020-122 is hereby revoked.

9.2.1 – Pre-budget Council expenditure approval – Computer Hardware.
Resolution

That Council authorize a pre-budget expenditure related to the procurement of computer hardware equipment and devices.

9.2.2 – Pre-budget Council expenditure approval – Water/Wastewater capacity study.
Resolution

That Council authorize a pre-budget expenditure related to the procurement of professional services to assess water and wastewater servicing/capacity and develop computer models for these systems.

9.3.1 – EMS Paramedic Response Unit Capital Purchase.
Resolution

That Council for the Town of Parry Sound authorize the purchase of two Ambulances from Crestline in the amount of $152,957 + HST, and
That Council approve the purchase of one Paramedic Response Unit from Rowland Emergency Vehicles in the amount of $71,219.00 +HST; and
That said units to be funded from the EMS Capital Reserve Fund.

9.4.1 – 2020 Economic Development Report, and;
Introduction of Regional Economic Development Officer James Cox.
Resolution

That the 2020 Economic Development Report attached as Schedule A be received for information purposes.

9.5.1 – Support to Keep Ontario Fire College Open.
Resolution

WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College has been in existence since 1949; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College is one of the primary sources of certified training for Ontario Firefighters; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College has built a reputation of integrity, credibility, and reliability in providing some of the best training to our Fire Services within the Province of Ontario; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College has been used to train and certify both Volunteer, Part-Time and Career firefighters throughout Ontario; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College gives Ontario Firefighters another option other than Regional Training Centers to obtain National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) certifications; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Fire College is the most cost-effective method to certify Firefighters to NFPA Standards in Ontario; and
WHEREAS the Ontario Government enacted and revoked 0. Reg. 379/18: Firefighter Certification in 2018; and
WHEREAS when the Ontario Government revoked 0. Reg. 379/18: Firefighter Certification, it was made known by the Office of the Solicitor General that the act would be amended and brought back in the future;
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Town of Parry Sound requests that the Province of Ontario reverse their decision to close the Ontario Fire College as the OFC is one of the best and most cost-effective methods for municipalities to train their firefighters which assists us in protecting our residents; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT this Resolution is forwarded to the Honourable Doug Ford, Premier of Ontario; the Honourable Sylvia Jones, Ontario Solicitor General; Norm Miller, Member for Parry Sound Muskoka; the Ontario Fire Marshal, Jon Pegg; District of Parry Sound municipalities, ROMA, OSUM and AMO.

9.5.2 Support for Pet Grooming to be Declared an Essential Service.
Resolution

That Whereas pet grooming is important to the health and welfare of these animals, and
Whereas pet grooming businesses have adapted best practices during the COVID pandemic, developing high standards of health and safety, and making their businesses contact-less;
Now Therefore the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound authorises the Mayor to send a letter to the Ontario Chief Medical Officer of Health requesting that pet grooming be deemed an essential service, for purposes of enabling pet grooming businesses to stay open during the current Stay-At-Home Order.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Appointment of Deputy Treasurer.

By-Law: 2021 – 7101
Being a By-law to Appoint Suzanne Diller as Deputy-Treasurer for the Town of Parry Sound.

10.3.1 – Amendment to the Fees & Service Charges By-law 2010-5408.
By-law 2021 – 7102
Being a By-law to amend the Fees & Service Charges By-law 2010-5408 to include an Appeal Fee, Property Standards and Clean Yards Administrative Fee, Planning Fee and Cost Recovery for Damage to Municipal Property by Motor Vehicle Accident Fee.

10.4.1 – Lakeland Holdings Shareholders Agreement Amendments.
By-law 2021 – 7103
Being a by-law to authorize the execution of Lakeland Holding Ltd. Amended Shareholders’ Agreement, substantially in the form attached as Schedule A.

Water Rates – an Uncomfortable Reality

Tags

,

Well, I am a little annoyed. I feel as though I have been patted on the head by a teacher who actually doesn’t understand the issue at hand. Or perhaps is trying to avoid the issue.

At the last meeting of Council the proposed water rates, applicable for the next decade, were approved. I’m okay with that. There is a price increase, but it is not too onerous and at least I can afford it. What annoyed me was the statement that the consultants did a sensitivity analysis on the rates based on comments received and estimated that the possible difference amounted to a $3 or $4 a year cost reduction for the average residential customer. They stressed the forecast by increasing the number of new accounts annually from 3 to 20 connections. What wasn’t provided in the council minutes was how that impacted water consumption. If the Report now estimates that consumption will increase by 0.6% over the next decade, it suggests the ‘high connection’ forecast figure is a 4% increase over the same period.

Well, let’s take a look at the history of the Town of Parry Sound water consumption over the past eight years, 2011 to 2019. (Staff, don’t you just hate it when taxpayers save old reports?) The increase over that period was 17.4%, from 160,222,866 to 188,077,355 Imperial Gallons.

It’s interesting to note that in the 2012 report by the same consultants it was stated – “Factoring in potential for further conservation of this period, no consumption growth has been assumed in the forecast.” I guess they that feel if they fooled us once they can get away with it again. Or perhaps they aren’t paying sufficient attention. Or these are the number that Staff wanted them to use.

So, in the past nine years the Town saw an increase in water consumption of 17.4% with a forecast of 0%, for the next decade we are to believe that consumption will only go up by 0.6%, or 4% in the ‘high connection’ scenario?

At the most recent council meeting Mayor McGarvey announced the following progress in 2020:
112 building permits issued
16 new residential units
4 commercial units
1 Best Western Plus hotel

That’s one year of development, and all of that development will be part of the coming decade’s water forecast.

Given the very obvious population migration north and the Town’s hot real estate market do you really think we will be seeing a development depression for the remaining nine years?

I call BS on Town Staff for the report and water rate recommendation. They are sandbagging and covering their asses. While there is nothing wrong with using a pessimistic, and arguably unrealistic, estimate of future water consumption growth, that scenario needs to clearly stated. But, explaining that the scenario was unreasonably pessimistic, and that proposed rates are probably higher than they need to be, would take courage because water customers would complain. It’s so much easier to pretend that the low growth numbers are ‘reasonable’ and avoid any complaints about the rates by stating something to the effect of ‘the rates fall out of the forecast costs and revenues’.

A question – is there any chance the Town of Parry Sound taxpayers will see the 2021 draft budget before it is approved?

A remembrance – Trevor, Christine, Brenda, I miss the courage and transparency you provided.

A reality – ignore me, but don’t try patting me on the head. I might bite.

Here is a link to the 2012 Report.

Here is a link to the 2020 Report.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – January 19, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , ,

There are no real surprises in the minutes of the January 19, 2021 meeting of the Town of Parry Sound Council.

9.2.1 – Provincial State of Emergency – Bobby Orr Community Centre Ice Out.
The ice will be removed from the Bobby Orr Community Centre with the possibility that it will be reinstalled if/when provincial restrictions are lifted and there is committed use of the ice.

10.1.2 – Water and Wastewater Rates.
There was discussion and a very slight rework of projected water use and how it impacted rates. It was felt that any increase would only negligibly impact rates. I continue to believe that there is sandbagging going on but agree there is little reason to alter the proposed rate structure. I will be following water consumption over the next few years to see how close it comes to the consultant’s report forecast. I won’t be surprised if there is a larger than forecast deviation from the report’s consumption assumptions.

A final question – when will we see the 2021 draft budget? I hope that it will not be rammed through to approval without community review and input. I am finding that transparency in the operation of the Town and Council is being reduced.

Abridged Council Minutes

Closed Session
That pursuant to Section 239(2) of the Municipal Act, R.S.O. 2001, Chapter 25, as amended, the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound move to a meeting closed to the public in order to address matters pertaining to:
d) labour relations or employee negotiations; (Collective Agreement Union Negotiations; and Employee impacts resulting from Provincial Declared Emergency Lock-Down);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (Collective Agreement Union Negotiations).

Presentations:
1. 2020 Order of Parry Sound
Mayor McGarvey presented the 2020 Order of Parry Sound to Linda West, recognizing her leadership role in establishing a COVID Response Committee within the Rotary Club of Parry Sound of which she is currently President.
Under this Committee, Ms. West organized a shopping and curbside pick-up/delivery service supported by Rotarians, Sobeys and many volunteers to ensure a safe, continued supply of groceries to area residents.
Ms. West recognized a need to supplement the Breakfast Club Program which has offered nutritious food items to all students attending physical school facilities. Students in need, learning at home on-line, were provided with grocery cards to be able to get those nutritious items previously provided at the school. High School students also struggling with on-line learning benefitted from a tutoring program set up through grants applied for by Ms. West.
Other projects initiated and/or coordinated by Ms. West included the organization of Christmas hampers, distribution of residential patio planters complete with soil and starter veggies, and bus delivery of grocery orders for a local First Nations community under temporary COVID lock-down.

Ms. West accepted the award, expressing appreciation in turn, saying: “I will cherish it for ever; nevertheless, it has been earned by a team who made great decisions, took action together, attracted support and delivered the services our community needed during this challenging year.”

2. 2020 Year in Review
Mayor McGarvey reviewed development in the Town over the last year, with accompanying photos illustrating building development and economic stimulus initiatives such as buy local campaigns.

3. Coping with COVID
Mayor McGarvey concluded his presentation with appreciation for the work of medical staff, front-line workers and volunteers during this COVID pandemic, as well as reminding the public on means of obtaining latest information with regards to the pandemic.

Additions to Agenda/Notice of Motion
1.1.1
Councillor Backman reported that she would like an opportunity to describe a Youth Founders entrepreneurial initiative. This was added as item 10.5.1 to the agenda.

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof
1.4.1
Councillor Horne declared pecuniary interest on item 10.4.1 regarding donations to the West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation and Lakeland Long Term Care from the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame Reserve Fund as these two organizations are governed and operated by the West Parry Sound Health Centre (WPSHC) and his spouse is the Chief Operating Officer for the WPSHC. Councillor Horne left the meeting for the item, did not participate in discussion, nor vote on the issue.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry expressing concerns regarding low lighting at the Pine Drive and Bowes Street intersection, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that he would review the lighting and cautioned that there might be restrictions in terms of light standards because of the congestion of transformers and wire-sets and set back requirements and clearances at that location.

3.2.2. – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding the deterioration of boat houses near the Sailing School, Director of Development and Protective Services Dave Thompson reported that staff has been attempting since last summer to address this situation with property owner MNR and presumed property lessees who own the boat houses, however to date have not been able move the issue forward, as MNR has not provided requested paperwork confirming the lease arrangements.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry as to what tourism marketing activity Explorers’ Edge has or is undertaking throughout the COVID pandemic, CAO Clayton Harris reported that he would contact both the Town’s Economic Development Officer Vladimir Shehovtsov and the new Regional Economic Development Officer James Cox to follow-up with Explorers’ Edge and report back to Council.

Correspondence
4.1 – Wayne Major

Concern regarding wait time & crowding at Town boat launches.

4.2 – Susan Heder
Appreciation for Rugged Trail.
Filed

4.3 – Lynne Atkinson
Request for Proclamation of Feb 6, 2021 as International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation.
See item 9.5.1 on Agenda

4.4 – Layla MacCallum
Request that ice stay in at BOCC, citing benefits of healthy activity for youth in particular.

4.5 – Dan Hildebrand, President, Parry Sound Hockey Club
Request that ice stay in at BOCC, until lock down has ended, i.e. Feb. 11 with commitment to use existing ice time to end of season, including extending use beyond March should the option be available.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – Provincial State of Emergency – Bobby Orr Community Centre Ice Out.

Resolution
That Council approve the closure of the ice surface at the Bobby Orr Community Centre in response to the Provincial Emergency Order/Closure of non-essential services.
Defeated

Resolution
That Council direct staff to proceed with the removal of ice at the BOCC; and
Further that staff be directed that should the state of emergency issued by the Province of Ontario be lifted before Feb 20th and, the demand for ice time rental is at or exceeds the current level that the ice be re-installed promptly so long as no other directives from either the province or the Health Unit prohibiting the use of the facility are issued in the interim.
Carried

9.2.2 Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program – Covid Stream – Local Government.
Resolution

That Council receive the report Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program – COVID Stream – Local Government for information purposes.
Carried

9.3.1 Declaration of Second Provincial Emergency.
Resolution

That Council receive the report Declaration of Second Provincial Emergency for information purposes.
Carried

9.4.1 Rural Economic Development Grant.
Resolution

Be it resolved that the Town of Parry Sound supports the DBA’s request to submit a grant application under the Rural Economic Development (RED) program; and
That the Town of Parry Sound provide 50% match funding up to $25,450.
Carried

9.5.1 – Proclamation of Zero Tolerance for FGM.
Resolution

Whereas International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is observed around the world and provides an opportunity to honor those women, girls, boys and men who are actively and courageously working towards an end to this harmful practice.
Whereas this day invites us to reflect on the fact that 4.1 million girls are still at risk of mutilation each year, including girls in Canada.
Whereas on this day, we acknowledge that female genital mutilation is an issue in more than 90 countries and on every continent except Antarctica, and that there are at least 200 million FGM survivors in the world, including more than 100,000 in Canada.
Whereas we acknowledge that FGM has no basis in any religious text and is recognized by the United Nations and other world bodies as child abuse and an abuse of a girl’s fundamental human rights.
Whereas we acknowledge that FGM has no benefits and causes only harm, including death, difficulties with urination, menstruation, sexual intimacy, post-traumatic stress disorder and increased maternal and child mortality.
Whereas on this International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, we acknowledge and celebrate all national and international efforts being made, especially at the grass roots level, to achieve United Nations Sustainable Millennium Development Goal #5, which calls for the elimination of FGM and other harmful traditional practices by 2030.
Whereas on this Day of Zero Tolerance, we call for increased, concerted global and Canadian action to end female genital mutilation, and ask all governments-international, national, and local- to fully uphold the human rights of women and girls so they can live a life free from the violence that is female genital mutilation.
NOW THEREFORE, Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby proclaim February 6, 2021, as International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation in the Town of Parry Sound.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 –
Temporary Borrowing Authorization.
By-law 2021 – 7096
Being a by-law to authorize temporary borrowing to meet the current expenditures of the Town of Parry Sound until taxes are collected and other revenues are received.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.1.2 – Water and Wastewater Rates.
Director of Finance Stephanie Phillips introduced Watson & Associates managing partner Andrew Grunda who provided an explanation of underlying assumptions made within the November 9, 2020 Water & Wastewater Rate Study, in response to some comments received from the public. Mr. Grunda noted that a review of the number of water connections made since 2010 at roughly 7 per year, combined with a review of the number of developments approved by Council, registered and building permit-ready helped to determine a projected number of 3 connections over the coming 10 years, which supports the recommended rates. At the request of Town staff in response to public comments concerned that the assumed projected development was too low, Mr. Grunda undertook a sensitivity analysis assuming an increase to 20 annual connections. This resulted in a projected annual reduction of only $3.00 to $4.00 per year for the average residential customer and therefore Mr. Grunda expressed confidence in the report’s recommended rates.
CAO Clayton Harris confirmed in response to Council discussion that staff could provide annual or more frequent reports on the number of connections and consumption as a means of keeping abreast of whether the report projections are on target or not and whether any rate adjustments should be made as a result of discrepancy between the projection and actuals.
By-law 2021 – 7097
Being a By-law to establish water and wastewater rates in the Town of Parry Sound, starting with the consumption month of March 2021.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

Resolution 2021- 007
That the Town of Parry Sound’s Ontario Regulation 453/07 Water Financial Plan prepared by Watson & Associates Economists Ltd. dated January 15, 2021 be approved; and
That notice of availability of the Financial Plan be advertised; and
That the Financial Plan dated January 15, 2021 be submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. (O.Reg. 453/07, section 3 (1) 6); and further
That the resolution of Council approving the Financial Plan be submitted to the MECP, satisfying the requirements under the Safe Drinking Water Act. (S.D.W.A. section 32 (5) 2.ii.)
Carried

10.3.1 – Agreements for the use of public property for Georgian Bay Airways/Tailwinds.
By-law 2021 – 7098
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of agreements with Georgian Bay Airways for the lease of a water lot; and maintenance of a Town parking lot.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.1 – Donations to the West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation and Lakeland Long Term Care from the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame Reserve Fund.
By-law 2021 – 7099
Being a By-law to Authorize Donations from the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame Reserve Fund, transfer the balance, and close the Fund.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.5.1 – Youth Founders Entrepreneurship.
Councillor Backman reported on and requested that a program entitled Youth Founders Entrepreneurship, aimed at working with youth aged 14 to 24 to help overcome barriers to finding meaningful work, be considered by the Founders Circle, of which the Town is a contributor. CAO Clayton Harris confirmed that in the first year of the Founders Circle some monies were set aside for consideration of high school student entrepreneurship, and that he would bring forward this issue for the Founders Circle to consider as well.

Council Agenda Preview – January 19, 2021

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

There are a couple of surprises in this week’s council meeting agenda. And of course, the water rate proposal ignores comments from members of the public because that would create too much extra work.

9.2.1 – Provincial State of Emergency – Bobby Orr Community Centre Ice Out.
Town Staff is suggesting that the ice surface be removed from the Bobby Orr Community Centre as a cost saving measure with the current restrictions prohibiting public use and the concern that the restrictions will continue through end of the usual season. The rink costs $3,250 per week in energy costs. This does not include staffing expenses, maintenance of the building, and capital costs. Some Staff might then be deployed to other Town activities.

10.1.2 – Water and Wastewater Rates.
I have already shared my comments in an earlier post. I will note that Mr. George Ashford provided a well-reasoned letter to the Town in response to the proposal. I know that he ran for Council at the last election and was not elected. I think he deserves your vote if he chooses to run again at the next election. He made the effort and took the time to comment. There is at least one not so pretty face on Council who seems to be asleep and perhaps should be given every second Tuesday evening off to catch a few winks.

10.4.1 – Donations to the West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation and Lakeland Long Term Care from the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame Reserve Fund.
This concerns a $100,000 donation to these two facilities from a reserve fund that was formed in 2007. I think this is a very generous donation that was requested by Mr. Orr. As I wrote in an earlier post, I do not think that his earlier support for the current Republican administration should be held against him anymore than one’s religion or ethnicity should be held against them for the actions of some extremists.

Spelling Lesson:
The device that measures your water and electrical consumption is a meter, not a metre. A metre is a unit of measurement, which the Yankees spell meter.

Closed Session
d) labour relations or employee negotiations; (Collective Agreement Union Negotiations; and Employee impacts resulting from Provincial Declared Emergency Lock-Down);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (Collective Agreement Union Negotiations).

 Presentations
1. 
2020 Order of Parry Sound
2. 2020 Year in Review
3. Coping with COVID

Correspondence
4.1 – Wayne Major

Concern regarding wait time & crowding at Town boat launches.

4.2 – Susan Heder
Appreciation for Rugged Trail.

4.3 – Lynne Atkinson
Request for Proclamation of Feb 6, 2020 as International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – Provincial State of Emergency – Bobby Orr Community Centre Ice Out.

Resolution
That Council approve the closure of the ice surface at the Bobby Orr Community Centre in response to the Provincial Emergency Order/Closure of non-essential services.

9.2.2 – Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program – Covid Stream – Local Government.
Resolution
That Council receive the report Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program – COVID Stream – Local Government for information purposes.

9.3.1 – Declaration of Second Provincial Emergency.
Resolution
That Council receive the report Declaration of Second Provincial Emergency for information purposes.

9.4.1 – Rural Economic Development Grant.
Resolution
Be it resolved that the Town of Parry Sound supports the DBA’s request to submit a grant application under the Rural Economic Development (RED) program; and
That the Town of Parry Sound provide 50% match funding up to $25,450.

9.5.1 Proclamation of Zero Tolerance for FGM.
Resolution
Whereas International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is observed around the world and provides an opportunity to honor those women, girls, boys and men who are actively and courageously working towards an end to this harmful practice.
Whereas this day invites us to reflect on the fact that 4.1 million girls are still at risk of mutilation each year, including girls in Canada.
Whereas on this day, we acknowledge that female genital mutilation is an issue in more than 90 countries and on every continent except Antarctica, and that there are at least 200 million FGM survivors in the world, including more than 100,000 in Canada.
Whereas we acknowledge that FGM has no basis in any religious text and is recognized by the United Nations and other world bodies as child abuse and an abuse of a girl’s fundamental human rights.
Whereas we acknowledge that FGM has no benefits and causes only harm, including death, difficulties with urination, menstruation, sexual intimacy, post-traumatic stress disorder and increased maternal and child mortality.
Whereas on this International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation, we acknowledge and celebrate all national and international efforts being made, especially at the grass roots level, to achieve United Nations Sustainable Millennium Development Goal #5, which calls for the elimination of FGM and other harmful traditional practices by 2030.
Whereas on this Day of Zero Tolerance, we call for increased, concerted global and Canadian action to end female genital mutilation, and ask all governments-international, national, and local- to fully uphold the human rights of women and girls so they can live a life free from the violence that is female genital mutilation.
NOW THEREFORE, Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby proclaim February 6, 2021, as International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation in the Town of Parry Sound.

By-laws
10.1.1 – Temporary Borrowing Authorization.
By-law 2021 – 7096
Being a by-law to authorize temporary borrowing to meet the current expenditures of the Town of Parry Sound until taxes are collected and other revenues are received.

10.1.2 – Water and Wastewater Rates.
By-law 2021 – 7097
Being a By-law to establish water and wastewater rates in the Town of Parry Sound, starting with the consumption month of March 2021.
Resolution
That the Town of Parry Sound’s Ontario Regulation 453/07 Water Financial Plan prepared by Watson & Associates Economists Ltd. dated January 15, 2021 be approved; and
That notice of availability of the Financial Plan be advertised; and
That the Financial Plan dated January 15, 2021 be submitted to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. (O.Reg. 453/07, section 3 (1) 6); and further
That the resolution of Council approving the Financial Plan be submitted to the MECP, satisfying the requirements under the Safe Drinking Water Act. (S.D.W.A. section 32 (5) 2.ii.).

10.3.1 – Agreements for the use of public property for Georgian Bay Airways/Tailwinds.
By-law 2021 – 7098
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of agreements with Georgian Bay Airways for the lease of a water lot; and maintenance of a Town parking lot.

10.4.1 – Donations to the West Parry Sound Health Centre Foundation and Lakeland Long Term Care from the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame Reserve Fund.
By-law 2021 – 7099
Being a By-law to Authorize Donations from the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame Reserve Fund, transfer the balance, and close the Fund.

Town of Parry Sound Proposed Water Rates

Tags

, ,

In this post I offer my analysis and comments concerning the proposed water rates for the Town of Parry Sound as presented in the November 8, 2020 report from Watson & Associates. I have separately been concerned with certain figures used in the report regarding customer numbers and water usage estimates. I have sent my concerns to the Town. A copy of my letter can be read through this link.

Top Line Numbers
The report presents the water and wastewater expense and revenue estimates for residential and non-residential water users. I have clipped and pasted the most relevant portions below.

The report, page 6-2, states (italicized for emphasis):

For water services, monthly base charges are forecast to increase by 5.0% annually for the period 2022-2028 and then by 3.9% in 2029. The consumptive rate is forecast to increase by 0.04% over the forecast period.

For wastewater services, monthly base charges are forecast to increase by 3.2% annually for the period 2022-2028 and then by 2.5% in 2029. No change in the consumptive rate is forecast over the period to 2029.

 The detailed calculations of the proposed water and wastewater rate calculations are contained in Appendices A and B to this report, respectively.

And on pages 6-4 and 6-5:

High volume non-residential users would either benefit (reduction in annual costs) or experience minimal increases in their annual water and wastewater bill. It is anticipated that the annual bill for a small residential customer would decrease slightly in 2021 (i.e. 1% decrease), while the bill for an average residential metered customer would increase by 9%. Greater bill impacts in 2021 would be seen for residential customers consuming greater than average annual water consumption (i.e. greater than 26,704 gallons). Bills for all customers would increase by approximately 2% each year for 2022-2029.

Comments

  1. The rates as presented use the forecast fixed and variable costs related to providing water and wastewater services. These forecast costs are then allocated over the expected number of customers (base rates) and volume used. An underestimate of either customers or usage will raise the recommended rates as presented in the report.
    I believe that the report is seriously underestimating the expected increase in water and wastewater usage. They are estimating an increase in customer number of 1.2% over the next ten years, all of them metered. Their estimate of billed water usage is expected to increase by less than 1% over the next decade, or 0.1% per year. This is despite the construction of some very obvious new multi-unit residences and the real possibility of an aquatic center, ‘da pool’.
    This underestimates the reasonable revenue that can be expected and increases the proposed rates represented in the report.
  2. The report suggests that billed water usage will essentially remain flat for ten years. That certainly is optimistic given the proposed rate structure. As proposed, the base (fixed) rate for metered residential customers will increase annually, but the consumptive rate is proposed to remain effectively unchanged over the next decade as presented in the report (below in italics).
    For water services, monthly base charges are forecast to increase by 5.0% annually for the period 2022-2028 and then by 3.9% in 2029. The consumptive rate is forecast to increase by 0.04% over the forecast period.
    For wastewater services, monthly base charges are forecast to increase by 3.2% annually for the period 2022-2028 and then by 2.5% in 2029. No change in the consumptive rate is forecast over the period to 2029.
    If the base cost increases annually but usage prices remain fixed there is little reason to conserve water, at least not to save money. Typically, organizations who wish to dissuade consumption increase the variable, or unit cost of an item. A good example is cigarette pricing. At $2 a pack there is little disincentive to buy a package of cigarettes. Raise the price to $13 and smokers either stop smoking or ration their usage. In the case of those water users who are not metered and enjoy an ‘all you can eat’ deal there is absolutely no reason to ration. Heck, you could get into the water business on a casual basis for our neighbours in the surrounding communities who are not sure their well water is really that safe. (Those water tests are such a pain.)

The Bottom Line
It really doesn’t matter what we say or point out, this report presents the Town of Parry Sound water rates for the next decade wrapped in a polished consultant veneer. I can afford the proposed increase but I worry about some of the folks in town who live on a fixed income.

As a consultant, I am more than annoyed with some of the assumptions underlying the conclusions and the lack of transparency. This includes, omitting historical customers and water usage, and not defining the terms underlying the forecast of customers and water use. It’s hard to comment on forecasts when the basic information and assumptions are missing. I suspect that the consultants expect the report will be received, not really understood, and accepted as written. These are competent folks and it would be hard to push back against their recommendations without some experience in the area. How often do you push back against your physician’s recommendations?

The net/net is that Council will accept the water rates as proposed in the report. Council unfortunately will not be able to claim that the rate structure encourages water conservation. The only way to accomplish conservation would be to require all residences to install water meters and make water incrementally more expensive with use above some sort of baseline. That is, as they say, a ‘third rail’ issue. They won’t touch it.

If you have particular comments, I encourage you to contact a member of Council. The formal commenting period has closed and the item is on this Tuesday’s agenda.

 

 

The Town of Parry Sound Water Report – WTF?

Tags

, , , ,

I opened the Town’s recently issued water report prepared by Watson & Associates Economists Ltd. to review it and take notes. It all started reasonably and then I hit page 2.1. (The report can be downloaded from the Town’s website through this link.) That’s where the WTF reaction arose.

The report states that there are currently 2,346 customers for water and 2,273 for wastewater services. Okay, that seems reasonable, the consultants have the Town’s account numbers. The report goes on to assume there will be a total of 30 new customers (three new accounts per year) for water and wastewater services over the period 2020 to 2030. I take this to mean from the beginning of 2020 to the end of 2029, a ten-year period. This is an increase of 1.3% over ten years. Water consumption is expected to increase by 0.7%.

How do you assume only 30 total new water customers when house conversions to multiple units are ongoing, the Lighthouse development will be coming on line, as will Thunder Creek? These two developments will create dozens of new accounts. There is also the Acorn Ridge development on Louisa Street with potentially hundreds of new accounts that is on the back burner for now but is more than likely to arrive in the next decade given the demand for housing in the Town and the willingness of people to pay whatever it costs to get out of the Big Smoke and retain the luxury of high speed internet without worrying about wells and septic systems.

What about the new Recreation Centre? Will they be filling the pool with water pumped directly out of the Big Sound?

The report states that it is presenting a ‘conservative’ forecast. There is ‘conservative’ and there is ‘sandbagging’. Town staff are pretty experienced at sandbagging. I see it regularly in the annual budgets and largely ignore it as it is not too egregious and there is no ulterior motive. If you put a budget item in at a higher cost than you actually expect to pay you are a hero for the savings. At the same time these ‘extra’ funds are now available to pay for other items that Council was not willing to consider because of the expense, or the savings can cover other items where there was an error made by underestimating a cost. Sandbagging is not hard to identify if you know what you are looking for.

It seems that in the case of the Water Report the sandbagging is being done to rationalize higher water rates. The largest part of water and wastewater costs are not related to the cost of purifying and pumping water or processing wastewater before discharge, it is related to the cost of building and maintaining the supporting infrastructure. This includes things like upgrading and servicing pumping stations, replacing pipe, and installing new pipe. With no growth in customers and water use there is no need for additional water related infrastructure; you take a maintain and upgrade only when necessary approach.

I have put off reading the cost and revenue estimates provided in the report pending an answer from the Town about the growth rate presented in the report. Once I have an explanation, I will take another look at the report and provide you with an overview of the report, the conclusions, and the implications. That won’t be until the ‘holiday week’ is over and Staff is available.

Do we need an economic development officer to get a total of 1% growth over ten years? Do we need a fulltime Chief Building Officer if there is no significant construction expected? What about a Planner?

Come on folks, was Staff unable to identify the discrepancy or did they actually request it? The Town would have seen and commented on the report before it was issued. Consultants know what they are doing. Forecasting a smaller than realistic growth in water accounts has the net effect of raising the rates the Town charges each of us for water and wastewater. It’s only a few percent points difference but it is meaningful. Screwing around with your assumptions to get the number you want is deceitful and ruins your credibility. Keep your assumptions realistic and be direct with the cost that will be required. Don’t sandbag it. Or if you do want to really lowball the numbers then state that in the assumptions. Don’t call it ‘conservative’.

Oh, in case you were wondering, WTF means What the Forecast.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – December 15, 2020

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

There are no surprises but there are issues you need to understand and possibly follow up on:
9.4.1 – Water & Wastewater Rate Study
9.5.1 – West Parry Sound Recreation & Culture Centre

Abridged Minutes

Closed Session
(c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land by the municipality or local board (developer request to purchase land from the Town; MTO offer to sell land to the Town);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (claim against Town funds);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (claim against Town funds);

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding a maintenance hole on Joseph St and the status of railing installation on Cascade St., Director of Public Works Mike Kearns responded that if temperatures moderate, a better patch work can be done for the rest of winter around the Joseph St. maintenance hole. With respect to the railing on Cascade Street, Mr. Kearns reported that although the railing was part of the contract installation, there was a decision made at some point not to re-install. Currently he is attempting to ensure design that will not impede snow removal and still allow for a 1.5 meter regulation width sidewalk.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Burden’s concerns on behalf of the Downtown Business Association (DBA) regarding garbage on James Street between Seguin and Mary, and their request for garbage containers mid-block, Mr. Kearns reported that the MOU between Town and DBA identifies that garbage receptacles are removed during winter conditions and a few remain. One of the challenges in wintertime is to place receptacles where they won’t impede snow removal.

2.3 – Councillor Backman commented that she would like the existing garbage receptacles in the downtownarea replaced by bins supporting recycling. In addition, Councillor Backman requested an update on the CIINO initiative to which CAO Clayton Harris responded per the following: The Regional Economic Development Collaborative is composed of all seven West Parry Sound area municipalities; the new EDO James Cox started December 7th with an office located in the Township of The Archipelago building; Chair Michelle Hendry and Mr. Harris met with him yesterday, and will set a meeting with Mr. Cox and the Town’s EDO Vlad Shehovtsov for Thursday.

3.2.4 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry as to potential for a rink at Kinsmen Park this winter, Mr. Kearns reported that the Health Unit has released guidelines on operating outdoor rinks, and that pending appropriate weather conditions, plans are in place to make an outdoor rink at Kinsmen Park.

3.2.5 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding winter solstice, Mr. Kearns reported that to his knowledge no celebratory plans were in place to recognize winter solstice this year.

Correspondence
4.1 – Rick Kerr

Request for amendment to Cemetery Regulations – for Council’s consideration.

4.2 – Ann MacDiarmid, Mayor, Seguin Township
Withdrawal from Boundary Adjustment Discussions.
Filed

4.3 – Aleesha Clark, Committee Chair, Absolutely Georgian Bay
Introduction of Absolutely Georgian Bay Tourism Cooperative Inc.
Filed

Deputations
5.1 – Tom Parks, OHE Consultants.

Request for exemption from Noise Regulations for Jail Demolition.
Mr. Park gave an explanation of the reason for the requested exemption from the noise regulations by-law and acknowledged that the Ontario Regulations 131/20 which prohibit municipalities from regulating construction noise between 6 AM and 10 PM may mean that his request is not necessary as contractors will be able to work from 6 AM to 9 AM prior to court, from 6 PM to 10 PM after court and on weekends and statutory holidays. In addition, Mr. Park responded to inquiries about how the work will be undertaken, including filling with uncompressible fill; and lighting during nighttime operations.

9.1.1 – Winter Control Level of Service Policy.
Resolution
That Council endorse and adopt the attached Winter Control Level of Service Policy for roads and sidewalks.
Carried

9.2.1 – Extension of Temporary Patio Permissions for Restaurants During COVID-19.
Resolution
Whereas on June 8, 2020 the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario (AGCO) permitted new patios or temporary additions to patios to provide more opportunities to local businesses while protecting health and safety, subject to municipal requirements, and provided an extension to these timelines on December 9, 2021; and
Whereas the Council for the Town of Parry Sound passed Resolution 2020-067 to permit temporary restaurant and bar patios and opted not to enforce the Zoning By-law or Site Plan Agreements as it related to parking infractions as a result of these patios until January 1, 2021; and
Whereas Covid-19 will be an issue affecting restaurants for the foreseeable future and the Town wishes to extend the timelines of this Resolution to be in tandem with the AGCO’s extension.
Now Therefore be it Resolved that the Council for the Town of Parry Sound supports an extension until January 1, 2022 to the terms noted in Resolution 2020-067.
Carried

9.2.2 – Consent Application B/45A&B/2020 – Macazer Holding.
Resolution
That Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby supports Parry Sound Area Planning Board Application Number B45A&B/2020 – Macazer Holding.
Carried

9.3.1 – The 2019-2020 Annual Report.
Resolution

That Council receive the 2019-2020 Annual Report as attached, and direct staff to make copies of it available to the public and circulated to MP Scott Aitchison, MPP Norm Miller, the Downtown Business Association, the Chamber of Commerce and other agencies and organizations as appropriate.
Carried

9.4.1 – Water & Wastewater Rate Study
Sean-Michael Stephen of Watson & Associates Economists addressed Council from a prepared presentation regarding a proposed ten-year sewer and water rate structure to address Council’s previous direction to move to a structure that includes a base charge and consumptive rate that is uniform across all customers. The proposed recommendation includes a differentiated rate based on meter size with no distinction between residential and non-residential customers, and consumptive component based on actual usage for metered customer with no minimum consumption charge. Built into the rate structure are increased annual charges for operating expenditures plus inflation estimated at 2% per year, and capital related expenditure based on the capital funding plan.
Resolution
WHEREAS Council approved a change from the current water and wastewater rate structure to a rate structure with a monthly fixed charge, based on meter size, and a consumptive rate (per gallon/per cubic metre) that is uniform for all customers; and
WHEREAS pricing structure changes were deferred to investigate additional options;
NOW THEREFORE Council hereby approves the posting of the Town of Parry Sound Water and Wastewater Rate Study for public circulation and comment; and
THAT the Water Financial Plan be prepared in the format required under O.Reg. 453/07 and submitted to the Province to maintain the Town’s Municipal Drinking Water Licence; and further
THAT the recommended rates be brought forward for consideration.
Carried

Other Business
9.5.1 – West Parry Sound Recreation & Culture Centre.

Spokesperson: Donald Sanderson, Chair, Wellness Centre & Pool Committee
Wellness Centre & Pool Committee Chair Donald Sanderson introduced himself and consultants present, and then proceeded to give a presentation from a series of slides on the proposed West Parry Sound Area Recreation Centre.
In addition, questions posed were responded to by Mr. Sanderson or other members of the team per the following:
– it is unknown whether funding is jeopardized if a municipality pulls out; the project and funding formula would need to be reworked for approval by remaining municipalities.
– although the objective of the proposal was to develop program for the facility using 5 acres, there is an additional 10 acres available as well as 9 acres owned by the Town abutting the property that could be used for additional programming.
– Soil samples have been taken in the parking lot and play field area, and on the existing developed area, and all is buildable.
– the building can be re-oriented or expanding upon once an architect has been selected to proceed with finalizing siting and design.
– The Municipal Joint Service Agreement requires 100% agreement of members to release a municipality from the Agreement, with the rationale that any municipality on its own deciding to undertake a recreation project of this magnitude would be committed for decades.
– 2% of annual operating budget is put into a reserve fund to address future capital expenditures – an industry standard.
– Terms of Reference for the Joint Municipal Service Board are essentially contained within the Agreement – a broad constitutional document to set up the Board.
– with respect to the receipt by other municipalities of the presentation, the Townships of McDougall and The Archipelago have both passed resolutions endorsing the recommendations; the Municipality of Whitestone received the presentation and will decide at a future meeting, which was their planned approach to the issue.
– the operating agent will be determined by the Joint Municipal Service Board; the hope is that an arrangement can be made with the YMCA.
– The YMCA owns the land and is agreeable to leasing it for a nominal amount per year for 100 years. If as a condition of funding the land must be owned by the grant recipient, the YMCA is agreeable to sell the land for a nominal amount.
– consider changing the word “burden” to something more positive in the Joint Municipal Service Board Agreement vis a bis “municipalities shall share the burden of the annual contribution.”
Mayor McGarvey thanked Chair Sanderson and other presenters.
Resolution 2020 – 147
Be it Resolved that subject to all area municipalities agreeing to participate as outlined in the attached report presented by the Wellness Centre & Pool Committee at the December 15, 2020 Meeting of Council, and subject to ICIP funding approval, The Council for the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound approves the following recommendations:
1. That the YMCA property, as recommended by CS&P Architects be approved as the site;
2. That CS&P Architects Option A be approved for the purposes of designing and constructing the facility;
3. That the cost sharing formula be approved for the allocation of operating and capital costs;
4. That a Joint Municipal Service Board be used by the municipalities, for the purpose of acting as an agent on behalf of the Municipalities, in the constructing, maintaining, fundraising and operating of the West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre; 5. That the Joint Municipal Service Board Agreement be approved, and the Mayor and Clerk be authorized to execute the agreement, substantially in the form attached;
6. That pending approval of the ICIP grant application the Steering Committee be directed to take the necessary steps to create the Joint Municipal Service Board;
7. That the Steering Committee be directed to enter into negotiations with the YMCA for the purposes of operating the facility; and
8. That the Steering Committee be directed to enter into negotiations with the YMCA to secure the approved site.
7-yes; 0-no – Carried Unanimously

9.5.2 – Request for Exemption from Noise Regulations By-law.
Resolution
Whereas Council has received a request per attached Schedule A for exemption from the Noise Regulations By-law 2009-5301; and
Whereas no concerns have been raised by Town staff with respect to the request for exemption, and
Whereas Ontario Regulation 131/20 filed April 7, 2020 and in effect for 18 months from date of filing, denies a municipality the power to prohibit and regulate noise with respect to construction activity in a municipality between the hours of 6 AM and 10 PM
Now Therefore the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby grant the applicant all requested exemptions from the Noise Regulations By-law 2009- 5301 per application attached as Schedule A.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Curbside Collection Contract Extension.

By-law 2020 – 7094
Being a bylaw to authorize the extension of an agreement with Waste Connections of Canada Inc. for curbside waste and recycling collection for two years, ending December 31, 2022.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.1 – 2021 Interim Tax Levy.
By-law 2020 – 7093
Being a By-Law to provide for an interim tax levy, for the payment of taxes, and for penalty and interest at 1 1/4 percent per month for the 2021 taxation year.
Passed, Signed & Sealed
Direction Approved for Staff Follow-up
That staff be directed to report back on the implications of waiving the 1-1/4% penalty under various options, i.e. over different number of months, etc.
Carried for staff follow-up.