Council Minutes (Abridged) – July 20, 2021

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The minutes from last week’s meeting have been issued and are summarized below.

FYI – the website will be offline for a week or two as I migrate the site to a new host. The challenge is to move almost 10 years of content. There is only one Town of Parry Sound council meeting this month so there shouldn’t be an interruption in providing the usual agenda preview. As always the agendas and minutes are available directly at the Town’s website.

Council Minutes Abridged

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes; (proposed property exchange);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (proposed property exchange)

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof
1.4.1 – Councillor Burden declared pecuniary interest on item 10.1.1 as the property belongs to a close relative. Councillor Burden left the meeting for duration of the item, did not participate in discussion, nor vote on the matter.

Public Meeting
2.1 – 19 Miller Street – Z/21-08 (FAD Architect Inc. on behalf of Kasmani).
The purpose of the first proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change from C1 to permit seven residential dwelling units within the existing building, with a request for parking spaces to extend onto municipal property.
No one spoke either in favour of, nor in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment.
Mr. Elgie advised that he had received correspondence from Hugh Logan, and from Brian Moore, both writing largely with concerns about inadequate parking.

2.2 – 106 William Street, Z/21-09 (Barnes).
The purpose of the second proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change from R2 to permit a conditionally approved severance. Reductions to lot coverage, lot depth, minimum front yard, minimum rear yards and lot area have been requested.
Steve Barnes responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment noting that he hopes this will be the last stage of a process to sever property at 106 William Street. Mr. Barnes gave an overview of the process between the Town and the Parry Sound Area Planning Board.
No one spoke in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment.
Mr. Elgie advised that he had received a letter of opposition from Mr. John Este who expressed concern that a rezoning would not provide sufficient front or rear yards for the lot fronting Hillcrest Ave. and that the current lot as it stands meets the provincial expectations for densification. Mr. Este wrote that if a special provision zone deems the deficient yards sufficient, there should be a height restriction of 5 metres for the Lot proposed to front Hillcrest Ave.

2.3 – 14 & 18 Bowes Street, Z/21-10 (Upton).
The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to amend the SP 26.35(h) zone to permit a mixed-use development with office space on the main floor and seven residential units above and behind the commercial use, on each of the two lots. The amendment will increase commercial/residential floor area ratio, lift the “h” symbol, and modify the rear yard setback.
No one spoke either in favour of nor in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment.
Mr. Elgie advised that he had received the following correspondence or messages:
a) a letter from Jo Bossart indicating that neither he nor Anne Bossart had any issue with the proposed rezoning; b) a voice message from Will Vowels opposed to the set back of 3′ instead of 6′ and the amount of asphalt and concrete used as it will destroy the watershed and cause flooding to neighbouring properties.

The Mayor advised that Council, at its discretion may approve the proposed Zoning By- law amendments and if so, must either circulate notice of passing of the by-law or give notice in the local press. Objections to the passing of the by-laws will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal. If an appeal is submitted and the appellant has not provided Council with an oral or written submission before the passing of the by-law, the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal may choose to dismiss the appeal.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1
– In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry regarding whether installation has been completed at the Salt Dock Boat Launch, Director of Public Work Mike Kearns reported that staff has started installation and that notification will be provided when it is ready.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the possibility of installing a park bench on Joseph Street between Isabella St and the Parry Sound Mall so that people walking who have accessibility issues can stop and rest, Mr. Kearns responded that staff will look into this.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding orange spray paint markings throughout the community, Mr. Kearns reported that under the infrastructure minimum maintenance standards that the Town follows, there is a process for inspecting and treating deficiencies in sidewalks, and orange marking is a recognized treatment to draw attention to potential hazards until the hazard can be repaired.
In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry as to the potential to change the marking colour from orange, given the colour’s association with residential schools, Mr. Kearns noted that orange is highly visible and a recognized cautionary colour in the construction industry. Mr. Kearns also noted in response to a further question, that data on these hazards and repairs is logged in a GIS system.

3.2.4 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding potholes, Mr. Kearns encouraged anyone noticing a pothole in need of repair to contact the Public Works Department at the Town Office. The issue will be logged and followed-up with. Potholes at a certain size are a defined deficiency within the minimum maintenance standards and the Town is well within compliance in terms of response time to fixing holes. The repair of potholes uses recycled hot-mix asphalt, so response time can take longer if the holes have water in them. The entrance to driveways is the responsibility of the property owner.

3.2.5 – In response to Councillor Burden’s inquiry on behalf of the DBA regarding hiring of a student to help with downtown clean-up, Mr. Kearns reported that the Town has been unable so far this year, to recruit or hire a student for this work.

3.2.6 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry as to whether the concrete slabs to be installed at the Salt Dock Boat Launch are intended as a short or long-term solution, Mr. Kearns reported that he hopes it will be long term as the concrete should perform better than the asphalt that was used previously. If the repair is not able to be undertaken in a timely manner, signage can be installed to advise on other boat launch locations.

Correspondence
4.1 – Jay Aspin, Board Chair, Near North District School Board.

Response to Town’s Resolution 2021-091 regarding JK-12 School.
Filed

4.2 – Michele Fraser, CFO, Seguin Township.
Contribution of $10,000 towards Stockey Centre operating costs.
Response letter of appreciation sent.

Deputations
N/A

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda
N/A

Consent Agenda
N/A

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
Resolution
That Council approve the 2021 Second Quarter progress report on the Town’s Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.
Carried

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.
Resolution
Whereas the Town is in the heart of the Georgian Bay Biosphere which is a region of global ecological significance that has an ongoing commitment to the United Nations and sustainability; and
Whereas environmental stewardship is a strategic priority for the Town; and
Whereas access to and the use of the waterfront is integral to the Town’s identity; and
Whereas the Town has a diverse and active waterfront user and business community; and
Whereas the Town wishes to enhance the waterfront as a people gathering place;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT an Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee be approved per Terms of Reference attached as Schedule A.
The following amendment was proposed:
That Section 6 of the Terms of Reference, being the definition of the waterfront area for purposes of the Waterfront Advisory Committee, be expanded to include the area from the municipal boundary with Seguin Township to the municipal boundary with the Municipality of McDougall, so that the entire Parry Sound waterfront area be within the purview of the Waterfront Advisory Committee.
Amendment carried
The resolution with amended Terms of Reference was voted on.
Carried as Amended

9.4.1 – 2021 Municipal Assistance Program Allocation.
Resolution
That Council approve the 2021 Municipal Assistance Program allocations per attached Schedule A.
Carried

9.4.2 – GIS Maturity Study.
Resolution
That Council approve sole sourcing the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Modernization Study under the Municipal Modernization Program (MMP), Intake 2 to Perry Group Consulting based on the firm’s completion of the Town of Parry Sound’s Technology Review, and the funding deadline provided by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH).
Carried

9.5.1 – Sail Parry Sound Support Request re: Phase 2 Application FedNor CCRF Grant.
Resolution
That Council support Sail Parry Sound submitting a phase 2 grant application to FedNor to undertake improvements on Town owned property leased to Sail Parry Sound, subject to obtaining appropriate agency approvals, liability insurance and the Town being a named insured;
That Council approve funding to an upset limit of $20,000 for the project; and That the Town provide a letter of support for inclusion with the application.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Stop up and Close 5 Gibson Street road allowance.

Resolution
That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound hereby decides to stop up and close a portion of the Gibson Street Road (5 Gibson Street – Shaw) Allowance as identified as Part 1 on Schedule “A”, and further that:
The applicant submits a deposit of $2,000 to pay for all legal costs;
That the requirement for a notice of the closure and declaration of surplus lands be waived; and
That the Mayor and Clerk be authorized to execute an Agreement of Purchase and Sale, and any necessary paperwork to finalize the transaction.
Carried
By-law 2021 – 7151
Being a By-law to stop up and close a portion of the Gibson Street Road allowance (5 Gibson Street – Shaw)
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.3.1 – Approval of Funding Agreement – Rural Economic Development Grant.
By-law 2021 – 7152
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with the Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs related to Funding Provided by the Province to the Municipality under the Rural Economic Development Program.
Passed, Signed and Sealed.

10.5.1 – Return Management of Belvedere Long-Term Beds to MLTC for Campus of Care.
By-law 2021 – 7150 (second and third readings)
Being a By-law to return management of 101 Long-Term Care Beds to the Ministry of Long-Term Care to be relocated into a Campus of Care at West Parry Sound Health Centre.
The following motion to amend the By-law was made:
That the following words be added directly after “Now Therefore”: “on the premise that the units will stay in the Town of Parry Sound,”
Amendment Carried
The following motion to postpone the By-law was
THAT the by-law be postponed to the August 10th Council meeting.
Carried to Postpone

 

Council Agenda Preview – July 20, 2021

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A reasonably short agenda with limited notable items.

4.1 – Jay Aspin, Board Chair, Near North District School Board. Response to Town’s Resolution 2021-091 regarding JK-12 School.
A wonderfully written letter in response to the Town’s resolution. First class! 

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.
It’s back again and with not much of a sense of vision. From reading the referenced letter it seems as though it will be a nice opportunity for people with similar interests to get together and think about waterfront maintenance.

10.5.1 – Return Management of Belvedere Long-Term Beds to MLTC for Campus of Care.
I’m confused and trust that the folks involved with this have a good handle on the issues and how this will best meet local needs.

Abridged Agenda

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes; (proposed property exchange);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (proposed property exchange)

Public Meeting
Council will hold a public meeting to consider proposed Zoning By-law amendments under Section 34 of the Planning Act.

2.1 – 19 Miller Street – Z/21-08 (FAD Architect Inc. on behalf of Kasmani).
The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change from C1 to permit seven dwelling units with the existing building, with a request for parking spaces to extend onto municipal property.

2.2 – 106 William Street, Z/21-09 (Barnes).
The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change from R2 to permit a conditionally approved severance. Reductions to lot coverage, lot depth, minimum front yard, minimum rear yards and lot area have been requested.

2.3 – 14 & 18 Bowes Street, Z/21-10 (Upton).
The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to amend the SP 26.35(h) zone to permit a mixed-use development with office space on the main floor and seven residential units above and behind the commercial use, on each of the two lots. The amendment will increase commercial/residential floor area ratio, lift the “h” symbol, and modify the rear yard setback.

Correspondence
4.1 – Jay Aspin, Board Chair, Near North District School Board.

Response to Town’s Resolution 2021-091 regarding JK-12 School.

4.2 – Michele Fraser, CFO, Seguin Township.
Contribution of $10,000 towards Stockey Centre operating costs.

Deputations
None

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – Update – Key Performance Objectives in Support of the Strategic Plan.
Resolution

That Council approve the 2021 Second Quarter progress report on the Town’s Key Performance Objectives (KPOs) as set out in Schedule A.

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.
Resolution

Whereas the Town is in the heart of the Georgian Bay Biosphere which is a region of global ecological significance that has an ongoing commitment to the United Nations and sustainability; and
Whereas environmental stewardship is a strategic priority for the Town; and
Whereas access to and the use of the waterfront is integral to the Town’s identity; and
Whereas the Town has a diverse and active waterfront user and business community; and
Whereas the Town wishes to enhance the waterfront as a people gathering place;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT an Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee be approved per Terms of Reference attached as Schedule A.

9.4.1 – 2021 Municipal Assistance Program Allocation.
Resolution
That Council approve the 2021 Municipal Assistance Program allocations per attached Schedule A.

9.4.2 – GIS Maturity Study.
Resolution

(Perry Group Project Proposal to be forwarded under separate cover by July 19, 2021)
Resolution
That Council approve sole sourcing the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Modernization Study under the Municipal Modernization Program (MMP), Intake 2 to Perry Group Consulting based on the firm’s completion of the Town of Parry Sound’s Technology Review, and the funding deadline provided by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH).

9.5.1 – Sail Parry Sound Support Request re: Phase 2 Application FedNor CCRF Grant.
Information to be provided under separate cover by Monday, July 19, 2021

By-laws
10.1.1 – Stop up and Close 5 Gibson Street road allowance.

Resolution
That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound hereby decides to stop up and close a portion of the Gibson Street Road (5 Gibson Street – Shaw) Allowance as identified as Part 1 on Schedule “A”, and further that:
The applicant submits a deposit of $2,000 to pay for all legal costs;
That the requirement for a notice of the closure and declaration of surplus lands be waived; and
That the Mayor and Clerk be authorized to execute an Agreement of Purchase and Sale, and any necessary paperwork to finalize the transaction.
By-law 2021 – 7151
Being a By-law to stop up and close a portion of the Gibson Street Road allowance (5 Gibson Street – Shaw).

10.3.1 – Approval of Funding Agreement – Rural Economic Development Grant.
By-law 2021 – 7152
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with the Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs related to Funding Provided by the Province to the Municipality under the Rural Economic Development Program.

10.5.1 – Return Management of Belvedere Long-Term Beds to MLTC for Campus of Care.
By-law 2021 – 7150 (second and third readings)
Being a By-law to return management of 101 Long-Term Care Beds to the Ministry of Long-Term Care to be relocated into a Campus of Care at West Parry Sound Health Centre.

Council Minutes (Abridged) – July 6, 2021

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Well, that was quite a meeting. A shout out to the Town of Parry Sound Clerk for summarizing the comments presented at the Public Meeting session. There was much more covered at the meeting, I offer a few comments below.

2.1 – Backyard Hens.
My father had a restaurant in the city and I grew up on a ‘hobby farm’ in the country outside Ottawa. We had cattle, sheep, pigs and, at one point, chickens. The chicken experiment ended when my mother’s dogs repeatedly killed them. Either the chickens or the dogs had to go. The chickens were my father’s idea, the dogs were my mother’s. The dogs also did a number on one of the sheep, another of my father’s ideas. They had to go. Enough said. I hope that Council doesn’t ‘chicken out’ in making a decision like they did with fluoridation and put it to a public vote. (Check out the input from the community below. Even CP Rail had input.)

2.2 7 – McMurray and Gibson Street.
Well, if you can’t expand your borders you need to expand up, that means more high-rises. Let’s remember that we are not the City of Ottawa which for years had rules that no building could be taller than the Peace Tower. A nice sentiment but it came with costs. (Again, check out the comments below.)

3.2.5 – Dogs at Beaches.
This is a public health issue. It’s not about disadvantaging a pet. There are reasons that infants are required to be diapered and ‘sealed’ to use public pools. Speaking of pools ….

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference. Resolution withdrawn.
When the going gets tough, hire a consultant. That puts off any type of decision for a couple more years, and provides plausible deniability of sorts. I’m sure there will be then be public complaints and it will need to be ‘reviewed (see below for context).

9.5.2. – Requesting new Accommodation Review Committee for Proposed School.
Yup, do the work and the due diligence and expect people to complain and demand a review. (In the U.S. the preferred review of some is a ‘recount’.) Note to Council, you can’t keep all the people happy, all the time. You would not be happy if a school board demanded you to go back and review one of your multi-million dollar projects because some folks didn’t like the personal implications.

10.5.1 – Return Management of Belvedere Long-Term Beds to MLTC for Campus of Care.
I would like to better understand the implications of this. Is this a way to shift costs away from the municipalities? There will be so much pain once payment of the many provincial and federal COVID-19 subsidies come due.

Abridged Meeting Minutes

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes, (proposed property exchange), (potential property purchase);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (proposed property exchange)
Carried

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof
1.4.1 – Councillor Horne declared pecuniary interest
on item 10.5.1 – Return Management of 101 Long-Term Care Beds to the Ministry of Long Term Care to be relocated into a campus of care at the West Parry Sound Health Centre, as his spouse is the Chief Operating Officer at the West Parry Sound Health Centre and is involved in the process. Councillor Horne left the meeting for the item, did not participate in discussion, nor vote on the matter.

Public Meeting

2.1 – Backyard Hens.
Manager of Building & Planning Services Taylor Elgie advised that the proposed Zoning By-Law amendment would permit backyard hens on residential lots that meet the minimum standards.
The following members of the public responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment:
a) Ben Prichard said that he is in support of backyard hens in Parry Sound and is excited about the prospect of teaching his kids about where food comes from, about sustainability, about the way the world works. Mr. Prichard said he thought it would increase property values and that there were many people who might flee the downtown area for rural areas, but for this compromise that allows people to stay in Town.
b) Trina Papalia noted that she currently has backyard hens in Town and didn’t know they were prohibited until she was served a notice from the By-law Enforcement Officer, with whom she has had a great conversation about backyard hens and the zoning by- law amendment process. Ms. Papalia noted that one of the points in the proposed zoning by-law amendment is that hens can only be located in a rear yard and that she asked that Council permit alternate locations for irregular shaped lots. Ms. Papalia noted that hens are a lot of work and that she thought having an educational piece to be included with a permit would be helpful.
c) Alex Walsh said that she echoed what Ben Prichard said, and that as the younger generation was returning to Parry Sound, they’ve lived in locations where they can have urban hens, and it is a consideration when thinking about choosing downtown vs. rural living. There is low risk if the coups are maintained properly and people are educated about how to maintain chickens.

No one responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment:

Mr. Elgie advised that he had received the following correspondence in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law Amendment:
a) Deborah and John Adams, on Wood Street requested that the existing by-law be enforced, and chickens prohibited. They noted there has been no opportunity for taxpayers to be properly notified that this issue is even being considered; a proper public meeting is not possible, and it is not prudent to consider town wide amendments. 6-8 months would be necessary to even bring an amendment forward. They made the following additional points: Town lots are too small; science has proven that eggs from back yard hens are no more nutritious than store purchased eggs, nor will money be saved; kids can be taught about where food comes from by visiting a farm, and there are safer alternatives for pets than hens; can lead to salmonella and E.coli; chickens are prone to diseases; costs to provide care are high; they are noisy, attract rodents and have noxious smells; they create dust that can cause respiratory problems; they reduce property values. The Adams requested that the by-law to be enforced as written today and that when the rezoning by-law is considered, a recorded vote be taken.
b) Jean Pennington wrote that hens attract rodents, raccoons and have a detrimental effect on the quality of life if every back yard suddenly decides to have chickens.
c) Sharon and Bryce Duncan wrote that farm animals should not be allowed in a residential neighbourhood as when cities expanded into rural areas it was discovered that livestock and homes were incompatible. Backyard hens lead to noxious smells, serious health issues and attraction of rodents, coyotes and foxes. The Duncans asked what is to happen with chicken excrement and dead chickens and how will the regulations be enforced. They wrote further that they did not feel the minimum lots sizes are big enough, that chickens should be registered and that property values will be reduced.
d) Mr. Hilts on Wood Street wrote that he is not in support and wishes to keep Parry Sound clean and healthy. Attached was an article reporting on 163 people who contracted salmonella across 43 states.
e) Colleen McLean on Waubeek Street wrote that she chose to live in town and not in the rural are for this type of reason. She further wrote about health risks, noise levels and predator concerns, and that permitting chickens would impact her decision to stay in Town.
f) Shirley Ramsay wrote that she is opposed.
g) Nancy Beers on River Street wrote that she feels the proposed lot size is too small and other municipalities have required larger lots, and setbacks need to be established. She wrote with concerns about smell and health issues and that this will attract predators such as coyotes.
h) Julie Chiaramonte of Waubeek Street wrote that she is opposed.
i) Kathleen & Mike Morrison on Margaret Street wrote that they are opposed and that hens belong on farms.

Mr. Elgie advised that he has received the following correspondence in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law Amendment:
a) Trina Papalia of Kristen Heights wrote that this is a current trend that has gained popularity with covid; backyard hens are not economical, but are often kept for affective reasons; requests that they be permitted in sideyards for odd shaped lots; requests guidance on how to dispose of waste; questions if people cannot own hens if they live in a semi or townhouse unit; feels it could be licensed similarly to dogs, and funds from permits could offset complaint costs.
b) Wendy Kelly and Christopher Metcalfe of Wood Street wrote that the right to food is a basic human right. They noted that smell, noise and predators are mainly misconceptions. Cleaning is easy as the enclosure size is small, and as long as the enclosure is properly made, there are no predators. Hens are quiet – quieter than dogs. Provides a food source and is a kinder enclosure than commercial operations.
c) Judy & Terry Ideson of River Street wrote in favour.
d) Caroline Quanbury of McDougall wrote that this is an easy way to access a healthy food source. Chickens are no louder than dogs, nor do they create more waste. Only permitting in rear yards doesn’t allow the opportunity for coups on odd shaped lots.
e) John Este of Riverdale Road supports the concept but is concerned about implementation as this by-law has the potential to blur the lines on land use compatibility. Mr. Este asked whether enforcement rules will be practical and what happens to rule breakers. He suggests a permit system and make it a fineable process.
f) CP Rail requested that if hens are permitted, they be kept in enclosures.

2.2 – 7 McMurray and Gibson Street.
Mr. Elgie advised that the proposed Zoning By-Law amendment would change from R2 to R3 to permit a 5 storey-17 metres tall mixed-use building with seventeen residential units and main floor mixed commercial/residential use.
Matt Ryan of FAD Architects, acting on behalf of Eco Development who made the rezoning application, responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment, expressing appreciation towards everyone who submitted comments, as there were many valid points brought forward. Mr. Ryan noted that this project addresses a number of challenges that currently face including the following:
1) One of the best ways to fight the effects of climate change is to reduce our dependence on the car. We do this by building higher density housing and making walkable and bicycle focused communities.
2) We want a vibrant active downtown core, currently we have many commercial vacancies which can be attributed to Covid. But we also need more people living and working downtown which will increase demand for goods and services. We have all been to vibrant cities and towns and one of the things that makes them vibrant is people. To clarify, the commercial space proposed for this project is to be owner occupied as an Art Gallery and Cafe and is focused on McMurray St.
3) This area contains some beautiful heritage homes, but it also has the Salvation Army Church building directly to the north of the subject property as well as the Ford dealership kitty corner to it and the Hub to the north; so this is really an area in transition.
4) This project represents a significant investment in the community. The developer is building a factory north of Town to manufacture CLT panels which will bring long term economic growth and jobs to the area. CLT stands for Cross Laminated Timber panels; a highly sustainable method of construction that actually has the ability to store carbon. It is considered a replacement for concrete which is a high emitter of carbon and considered one of the bad boys of climate change. This building will be built using CLT panels.
5) This project offers more sustainable planning practises, more sustainable construction methods, long term sustainable economic growth and by bringing more people downtown, a more sustainable, more vibrant downtown core.
Mr. Ryan noted that there are challenges – parking being one of them, but argued that in the past, planning was guided more by the automobile than quality of life. As issues of parking and car dependence won’t be resolved overnight, Mr. Ryan proposed a compromise with a reduction in the building height to 4 stories, which would reduce the number of residential units to 13 and would require 16 parking spaces with an actual 19 spaces being provided on site.
Referring to points that Mr. Este made in his letter, Mr. Ryan recommended the Town increase the cash-in-lieu of parking amount on future projects to encourage developers to find actual solutions to parking needs or require them to propose alternatives. Mr. Ryan noted that as a building owner in the downtown core that has no parking on-site he has had to make arrangement to rent 2 spaces from the neighbouring property.
Joel Kennedy responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment, noting that he had provided a written letter on behalf of several residents of Gibson Street. In addition to his letter, which Mr. Kennedy indicated should stand for itself, he referred to the congested traffic and parking today at Market Square Park during the Tuesday market.
Mr. Elgie advised that he had received the following correspondence:
a) Piotr Piotrowski of Gibson Street wrote that Gibson Street is a unique area with architectural character and the proposal will affect the heritage nature of the existing development. This street was chosen by the film industry due to its heritage nature. Increased traffic from the development will bring traffic hazards.
b) Nancy Cunningham of Salt Dock Road wrote that this property is in the core of Town and Market Square and McMurray Street was anchored by the courthouse on one end and the Governor Beatty residence at the other. This street is not an arterial/collector street and is supposed to be a quiet residential street. Properties have invested in the immediate area to renovate per the existing character – the Town’s planning documents need to be relied upon when owners invest this much. The building would be too tall and over the tree line, dominating the area. The BIA has many vacancies, why would commercial extend out of the downtown? Parking requirements will be extensive and there is no room to park on street. Pointed out examples where long term consequences can be felt, 1 – the waterfront trail when save our shoreline was created, 2 – commercial development at the north and south sucking the life out of the downtown, 3 – oil drums on the shoreline and the necessary clean up required.
c) Joel Kennedy plus 22 others from Gibson Street wrote that the proposed rezoning asks for fundamental changes contrary to the Official Plan, and that the proper zoning considerations should be applied. Property is surrounded by heritage homes and OP requires regard for character. Concerns with aesthetics and requests a heritage analysis. Height is a great concern. The proposal is for commercial in an area where it is not permitted and is not necessary.
d) Leslie Kovacs wrote that this location is inappropriate for this type of building. Development must be done in close consultation with existing residences and there are more appropriate locations.
e) Tom Gibson wrote that this would not enhance the immediate area.
f) Stephen Heder of Church Street wrote that the proposal is too tall and has too few parking spaces. He requests consideration for less than five storeys, more parking and less congestion.
g) Jim and Marian Ferris, Mac and Debbie Kirk, and Penny Ferris of William Street agree with opposition on the same grounds as Mr. Kennedy. Parking is a concern as there is limited street parking. They do not like the design of the building and think it doesn’t fit in; it is too high. They are worried about snow clearing and ask whether the infrastructure can handle a 5-storey building. They recommend it be built to 3 storeys with a roof garden to provide recreational and garden space for tenants and drop the commercial component due to the variety of available sites in town.
h) John Este of Riverdale Road wrote that he would support the rezoning if parking requirements could be met. Not providing the necessary parking leads to infractions on nearby landowners. If this development does not provide the necessary parking, and more demand is then put on Town streets, would parking meters be returning to offset the impact on public lands?
i) Hugh Logan of James Street wrote that new rental units are a good thing, but this location is not well suited for such a large project. Increased congestion, noise, shadow effects could all be impacts. There should be no concessions on building setbacks or parking requirements.
j) Declan O’Carroll of Scarborough, McKellar and Parry Sound wrote that Gibson Street has always been a walking destination to look at century Victorian homes. Parking is already a problem.
k) John O’Carroll and David Bouchard of Gibson Street wrote that the lands are zoned for a triplex, not commercial and 16 residential units and five stories. The building does not suit the neighbourhood as it’s a heritage area.
l) Brian O’Carroll of Gibson Street wrote that the proposal will not blend in with the area. Development of this site should be done in a tasteful manner and the appearance seems industrial.
m) Aleesha Mullen of Mary Street wrote in favour of the proposal noting that if the Town wants a sustainable, successful and economically viable downtown, more people need to live downtown. She frequently hears that people want more shops, restaurants, cafes and less vacant store fronts, so more people need to live downtown. The proposal is a step in the right direction. Higher density housing creates more affordable housing options, increases tax base and has positive environmental implications.
CP Rail provided general comments.

2.3 – 70 Joseph Street.
Mr. Elgie advised that the proposed Zoning By-Law amendment would change the Official Plan designation from District Commercial to the Joseph Street mixed use designation and change the zoning of the property to a Mixed-Use Special Provision, with an intent to permit a variety of commercial and stand-alone residential uses.
Brandi Clement, Project Planner, and partner with Jones Consulting, responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in favour of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment and provided a presentation with the following information:
– Redevelopment proposed for 70 Joseph Street, known as Parry Sound Mall, which has 71 metres frontage on Joseph St. and 250 Metres frontage on Mall Drive, with a total lot area of 6.88 hectares (ha) (17 acres).
– In June 2020, and June 2021, land received approval for a severance creating 2 lots, one being 1.47 ha (3.6 acres), and the other 5.3 ha (13 acres) to house the remaining portion of the mall.
– A 70-residential unit rental development is proposed on the smaller severed portion, with ground floor commercial accessed from the parking lot facing Joseph Street. The development is of varying heights from one to three storeys, separated by a courtyard from the existing mall, and includes an interior courtyard. The highest point is 11.23 metres high (37 ft); stucco exterior coloured blue with white accents. Units include bachelor, 1-bedroom, 1-bedroom + den, and 2-bedroom, with smallest being 343 sq. m. and largest 1,031 sq m. Total gross area of this building is 5,600 sq m, (61,000 sq ft); parking provided on west side of property for residential units with existing parking on east side available for the mall with a cross easement proposed that all uses on site can use all parking spaces. Density is 48 units/ha.
– Remnant of mall structure will contain all commercial uses, and include the existing school, the fitness centre, and smaller commercial uses and indoor self storage lockers at a total area or 8,100 sq m. or 87,000 sq ft.
– A restaurant drive-through is proposed for the NE corner, at the intersection of Joseph and Mall Dr. with a building size of 186 sq m. (2000 sq ft).
– Set-backs are: minimum rear set back of 6 metres and front yard set back 1.19 m. A reduction in the size of parking spaces is requested from 3 m x 6 m to 2.75 m x 6 m, as well as a reduction in the total number of parking spaces required from 562 to 503 spaces.
– Technical documents submitted include a Planning Justification Report, Traffic Impact Study, Functional Servicing and Stormwater Management Design Brief, and Noise Feasibility Study.
No members of the public responded to the Mayor’s invitation to speak in opposition to the proposed Zoning By-law amendment and Mr. Elgie advised that he had received no correspondence to date on the matter.
The Mayor advised that Council, at its discretion may approve the proposed Zoning By- law amendments and if so, must either circulate notice of passing of the by-laws or give notice in the local press. Objections to the passing of the by-laws will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal. If an appeal is submitted and the appellant has not provided Council with an oral or written submission before the passing of the by-law, the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal may choose to dismiss the appeal.
That we do declare the public meeting closed and the regular meeting reconvened. Carried

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding measures being taken to deal with poison ivy in the Greenwood Subdivision, Director of Public Work Mike Kearns reported that a resident there brought it to the Public Works’ attention, and as it is a noxious weed and must be removed, a pesticide will be used to eradicate it since mechanical removal of the entire root structure is more difficult.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiries regarding boulevard maintenance, Salt Dock repairs, and Champaigne Street boat launch expansion, Mr. Kearns noted the following: It has been difficult keeping up with turf management as the Department has had a hard time filling student and/or casual positions and he encouraged anyone looking for summer work in particular, to make application to the Town.
With respect to the boat ramp at the Salt Docks Mr. Kearns reported that the pre-cast concrete slab ordered should be delivered late this week and as soon as it is installed, the boat launch can be reopened.
With respect to expanding the Champaigne St boat launch parking lot, Mr. Kearns reported that he is not sure how much land is available, or the condition of the land adjacent to the water, however it is something that can be looked at.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding the status of school zone signage installation on Parry Sound Driver per request of the Parry Sound Forest School, Mr. Kearns reported that an appropriate location is being sought in consultation with the School, and the signage should be installed soon.

3.2.4 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding the skateboard park, and the water fountain installation at Waubuno Beach, Manager of Parks & Recreation April McNamara reported that with respect to the skateboard park, there are plans in place to paint when there are good weather days. With respect to the water fountain, Ms. McNamara reported that it is installed, however they are awaiting a part before activating.

3.2.5 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the placement of the accessible mobi-mat at Waubuno Beach, as well whether dogs are permitted to swim at the public beaches, Ms. McNamara confirmed that the mobi-mat is installed, and lifeguards are on duty. With respect to pets, Ms. McNamara confirmed that public health directives prohibit pets from swimming at public beaches designated for people due to the risk of E.coli, and bacterial infections. Instead Ms. McNamara encouraged people to take their pets to the rugged trail past the Salt Docks. Ms. McNamara also confirmed that additional signage could be installed at the Beach identifying the prohibition on pets swimming there.

3.2.6 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding access to Tower Hill Lookout Tower, Ms. McNamara reported that she has consulted with COVID Public Health line, who have advised that the Tower cannot yet be opened as there is no way to ensure physical distancing. Once physical distancing and masking is no longer necessary, the Tower can be opened.

Correspondence
4.1 – Christy Cafovski, Executive Director, Parry Sound Area Chamber of Commerce.

Letter of appreciation for grant of $5,000 – Filed.

4.2 – Petition from Parry Sound residents and taxpayers.
Request Town refuse the demand of a bridge over Rotary Fitness Trail – Filed

Deputations
None

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – Absolutely Georgian Bay – Request for Financial Assistance.
Direction to Staff Approved
That staff include the funding request from Absolutely Georgian Bay under the 2021 Municipal Assistance Program.
Carried

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.
Resolution withdrawn
Whereas the Town is in the heart of the Georgian Bay Biosphere which is a region of global ecological significance that has an ongoing commitment to the United Nations and sustainability; and
Whereas environmental stewardship is a strategic priority for the Town; and
Whereas access to and the use of the waterfront is integral to the Town’s identity; and
Whereas the Town has a diverse and active waterfront user and business community; and
Whereas the Town wishes to enhance the waterfront as a people gathering place;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT an Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee be approved per Terms of Reference attached as Schedule A.
With the consent of Council, mover and seconder Councillors Keith and Horne respectively withdrew the motion.
Direction for Staff Follow-up
That Staff be directed to research whether funds are available to put out to RFP to update the Waterfront Development Plan.
Carried

9.2.3 – Funding Application under the Canada Community Revitalization Fund
Resolution
That Council directs staff to submit an application under the Canada Community Revitalization Fund in an amount not to exceed $200,000 to revitalize the Rotary & Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail.
Carried

9.3.1 – Ontario Regulation 284/09 – Excluded Expenses from the 2021 Budget. Resolution
That Council hereby adopts the compliance report for expenses excluded from the 2021 budget outlined in the staff Report and Recommendation “Ontario Regulation 284/09”, attached as Schedule “A”, as a requirement of Ontario Regulation 284/09 passed under the Municipal Act, 2001, S.O. 2001, c.25
Carried

9.4.1 – RFP award: Supply and Delivery of Animal Proof Combination Waste/Recycling Receptacles for Parks & Open Spaces.
Resolution
That Council accept the proposal from Busch Systems International Inc., for the supply and delivery of fifteen animal proof combination waste/recycling receptacles for the Parks Department in the amount of $23,646.75, plus, HST for 2021, $25,956.80, plus HST for 2022 for a total two-year project cost of $56,052.01, this proposal being lowest of three proposals received.
Carried

9.4.2 – Wastewater: Upgrade Gas Detection and Replace Sewer Camera and Locator.
Resolution

That Council authorize the upgrade of the gas detection in the inlet works, relocate the sensors and bring up to code at a cost not to exceed $25,000; and
That Council authorize the replacement of the existing sewer camera and locator at a cost not to exceed $20,000; and
That the projects be funded through the Wastewater Stabilization Reserve.
Carried

9.5.1 – Public Health Funding.
Resolution

Whereas, the Government of Ontario in its budget of April 11, 2019, initiated a Public Health Modernization process which included a change in municipal cost-sharing from 25% of mandatory public health programs covered by municipalities to 30% of almost all public health programs based on 2018 third quarter spending levels; and
Whereas, on August 21, 2020, the Ministry of Health (Ministry) announced that provincial mitigation funding would be provided to offset the increase to municipal cost- sharing for 2020 and 2021; and
Whereas the COVID-19 pandemic, which started in early 2020, has further affected municipalities’ ability to pay levy increases, has stalled modernization processes, increased the cost-of-living, and affected the health and well-being of the public, and more specifically, public health clients and staff;
Therefore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound supports the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Units call per letter and resolution attached, to return to the 2018 cost-sharing formulas at 25% – 75%, with 100% provincially funded program; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved that the Town of Parry Sound supports mitigation funding continue for 2022 to eliminate the additional financial burden of a 42-50% levy increase to the 31 member municipalities of the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit, if it is not possible to return to the 2018 cost-sharing formula with 100% provincially funded programs; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound requests the 2022 public health funding include increases to reflect cost-of-living increases, public health program changes related to ongoing COVID-19 response, and funding to assist with program and community recovery efforts; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound requests a base funding increase to fund an Associate Medical Officer of Health to support the Medical Officer of Health with the continual demands of 24/7 on call coverage that have been highlighted throughout the COVID-19 pandemic; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound sends a copy of this resolution to the Minister of Health, MPP Norm Miller, North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit, and member municipalities within the said Health Unit.
Carried

9.5.2. – Requesting new Accommodation Review Committee for Proposed School.
Resolution

WHEREAS our schools are a vital part of the educational, social and economic development that is integral to the West Parry Sound area municipalities;
AND WHEREAS an Accommodation Review Committee (ARC) was established in 2013 to review Nobel and McDougall elementary schools;
AND WHEREAS the Near North District School Board (NNDSB) included the Parry Sound High School (PSHS) within the same ARC as Nobel and McDougall elementary schools;
AND WHEREAS in 2018 the Ministry of Education put a moratorium on the closing of any schools in the Province of Ontario;
AND WHEREAS after the moratorium by the Province, and based on an outdated ARC, the NNDSB has announced the closure of Nobel and McDougall elementary schools for a junior kindergarten to grade 12 mega school at the location of the PSHS;
AND WHEREAS the preliminary design plans for a new mega-school does not reflect the growth for the West Parry Sound area over the past 8 years;
AND WHEREAS the ratepayers of West Parry Sound contribute over $15 million dollars annually towards local education;
AND WHEREAS the NNDSB has not communicated adequately with the municipal governments and residents in which the schools are located;
AND WHEREAS the elementary students and their parents from the West Parry Sound area deserve to have their voices heard in respect to the location and design of a new mega school;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound requests that the Near North District School Board convene a new Accommodation Review Committee for the junior kindergarten to grade 12 mega school;
AND FURTHER THAT an independent study of enrollment and population figures be completed prior to the finalization of the JK-12 mega school;
AND FURTHER THAT this resolution be forwarded to the West Parry Sound Municipalities, Shawanaga First Nation, Wasauksing First Nation, Henvey Inlet First Nation, Magnetawan First Nation, Moose Deer Point First Nation, Near North District School Board Trustee John Cochrane, the Honourable Doug Ford, Premier of Ontario, the Honourable Stephen Lecce, Minister of Education, Parry Sound-Muskoka MP Scott Aitchison, and Parry Sound-Muskoka MPP Norm Miller.
Carried

9.5.3 National Forest Week.
Resolution

WHEREAS forests cover 66% of the province and 71.1 million hectares, and are an indispensable source of ecological, cultural, health, social and economic benefit,
WHEREAS Ontario’s forests are also located on the traditional territory of diverse Indigenous nations and provide nourishment and cultural value to these groups,
WHEREAS Parry Sound’s forested greenspaces offer valuable recreational opportunities for its residents and visitors,
WHEREAS Parry Sound’s urban forests are not only a center for physical, mental and social wellbeing but also a contributor of essential ecological services for the town such as pollution reduction, stormwater retention, cooling and wildlife habitat,
WHEREAS: National Forest Week with the theme this year of “Our Forests – Continually Giving”, is an annual one-week campaign which recognizes the critical contribution of forests to Canada and its people,
THEREFORE the Council of the Town of Parry Sound declares September 19–25, 2021 as: “NATIONAL FOREST WEEK” in Parry Sound.
Carried

9.5.4 – National Rail Safety Week.
Resolution

Whereas Rail Safety Week is to be held across Canada from September 20 to 26, 2021;
Whereas it is in the public’s interest to raise citizens’ awareness of the dangers of ignoring safety warnings at level crossings and trespassing on rail property to reduce avoidable deaths, injuries and damage caused by incidents involving trains and citizens;
Whereas Operation Lifesaver is a public/private partnership whose aim is to work with the public, rail industry, governments, police services, media and others to raise rail safety awareness;
Whereas CN has requested Town Council adopt this resolution in support of its ongoing efforts to raise awareness, save lives and prevent injuries in communities, including our municipality;
Now Therefore it is hereby RESOLVED to support national Rail Safety Week to be held from September 20 to 26, 2021.
Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – New Parks By-law for the Town of Parry Sound.

By-law 2021 – 7145
Being a by-law to regulate the use of Public Parks.
Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.1.2 – Salt Dock Inspection.
By-law 2021 – 7146
Being a By-law to authorize a transfer from the Smelter Wharf Reserve Fund for an inspection of the Smelter Wharf.
Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.1.3 Zoning By-law Amendment – William Street (Robert L Tudhope LK&K Inv Ltd.).
By-Law 2021 – 7148
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Z/21/03 – William Street (Robert L Tudhope LK&K Inv Ltd.).
Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.3.1 – Asset Management Plan Progress and Strategic Asset Management Policy Update.
By-law 2021 – 7147
Being a By-law to approve an updated Strategic Asset Management Policy for the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound.
Passed, Signed & Sealed.
Resolution
Be it resolved that Council accepts the Asset Management Plan update in accordance with the Town’s Strategic Asset Management Policy and O. Reg. 588/17: Asset Management Planning for Municipal Infrastructure under the Infrastructure for Jobs and Prosperity Act, 2015.
Carried

10.5.1 – Return Management of Belvedere Long-Term Beds to MLTC for Campus of Care.
By-law 2021-7150
Being a By-law to return management of 101 Long-Term Care Beds to the Ministry of Long-Term Care to be relocated into a Campus of Care at West Parry Sound Health Centre.
Read a First Time, this 6th day of July, 2021.
Council voted in favour of postponing the second and third readings to the July 20, 2021 meeting.

Council Agenda Preview – July 6, 2021

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There are a number of interesting items on the agenda as noted below.

2.2 – McMurray and Gibson Street, 2.3 – 70 Joseph Street
Development in the downtown seems to be increasingly focused on providing additional residential properties. There is no question that the Town has become the destination for folks who don’t have the financial resources or the interest in maintaining a more rural property. At the same time there are fewer retail businesses. Hopefully these storefronts will be replaced by the service providers necessary for the increasing population, mostly senior.

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.
I hope this once again is not another committee whose recommendations are accepted and filed away. It’s worth noting that the meetings are open to public. I suggest people take advantage of the opportunity to keep informed about the recommendations being developed. I suppose that guests can’t comment at the meeting but they certainly have the opportunity to share their thoughts with the Town outside of the meeting.

9.4.1 – RFP award: Supply and Delivery of Animal Proof Combination Waste/Recycling Receptacles for Parks & Open Spaces.
I wish that Tower Hill hill was included in the first stage of the process. With the picnic benches up there it sees a fair amount of food related trash that gets pulled apart by the birds and critters.

9.5.2. – Requesting new Accommodation Review Committee for Proposed School.
Yup, you can ask for input but it is only after you put out a final plan that folks come out of the woodwork with concerns. It doesn’t matter if it a school or a recreation centre. At least it’s not my job to deal with this. Some people actually earn what they are paid if only to compensate for the frustration. You may have noticed that I don’t call out individuals on Council or Staff. Their job is tough enough with stuff like without receiving personal criticism.

10.3.1 – Asset Management Plan Progress and Strategic Asset Management Policy Update.
I probably should go through the document, but I won’t. At least I don’t think I will. Any volunteers? I would be happy to post up your comments.

Abridged Council Agenda

Closed Session
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes, (proposed property exchange), (potential property purchase);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (proposed property exchange)

Public Meeting
Council will hold a public meeting to consider three proposed Zoning By-law amendments under Section 34 of the Planning Act, with one requiring Official Plan (OP) amendment as well. The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law and/or OP amendments are as follows:

2.1 – Backyard Hens – to permit backyard hens on residential lots that meet the minimum standards.

2.2 7 – McMurray and Gibson Street – to change from R2 to R3 to permit a 5 storey- 17 metres tall mixed-use building with seventeen residential units and main floor mixed commercial/residential use proposed.

2.3 – 70 Joseph Street – to change designation from District Commercial to the Joseph Street mixed use designation and change the zoning of the property to a Mixed-Use Special Provision, with an intent to permit a variety of commercial and standalone residential uses.

Correspondence
4.1 – Christy Cafovski, Executive Director, Parry Sound Area Chamber of Commerce.

Letter of appreciation for grant of $5,000.
4.2 – Petition from Parry Sound residents and taxpayers.
Request Town refuse the demand of a bridge over Rotary Fitness Trail.

Deputations
None

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – Absolutely Georgian Bay – Request for Financial Assistance.

Direction
That staff include the funding request from Absolutely Georgian Bay under the 2021 Municipal Assistance Program.

9.2.2 – Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee Terms of Reference.
Resolution
Whereas the Town is in the heart of the Georgian Bay Biosphere which is a region of global ecological significance that has an ongoing commitment to the United Nations and sustainability; and
Whereas environmental stewardship is a strategic priority for the Town; and
Whereas access to and the use of the waterfront is integral to the Town’s identity; and
Whereas the Town has a diverse and active waterfront user and business community; and
Whereas the Town wishes to enhance the waterfront as a people gathering place;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT an Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee be approved per Terms of Reference attached as Schedule A.

9.2.3 – Funding Application under the Canada Community Revitalization Fund. Resolution
That Council directs staff to submit an application under the Canada Community Revitalization Fund in an amount not to exceed $200,000 to revitalize the Rotary & Algonquin Regiment Fitness Trail.

9.3.1 – Ontario Regulation 284/09 – Excluded Expenses from the 2021 Budget.
Resolution

That Council hereby adopts the compliance report for expenses excluded from the 2021 budget outlined in the staff Report and Recommendation “Ontario Regulation 284/09”, attached as Schedule “A”, as a requirement of Ontario Regulation 284/09 passed under the Municipal Act, 2001, S.O. 2001, c.25

9.4.1 – RFP award: Supply and Delivery of Animal Proof Combination Waste/Recycling Receptacles for Parks & Open Spaces.
Resolution

That Council accept the proposal from Busch Systems International Inc., for the supply and delivery of fifteen animal proof combination waste/recycling receptacles for the Parks Department in the amount of $23,646.75, plus, HST for 2021, $25,956.80, plus HST for 2022 for a total two-year project cost of $56,052.01, this proposal being lowest of three proposals received.

9.4.2 – Wastewater: Upgrade Gas Detection and Replace Sewer Camera and Locator.
Resolution

That Council authorize the upgrade of the gas detection in the inlet works, relocate the sensors and bring up to code at a cost not to exceed $25,000; and
That Council authorize the replacement of the existing sewer camera and locator at a cost not to exceed $20,000; and
That the projects be funded through the Wastewater Stabilization Reserve.

9.5.1 – Public Health Funding.
Resolution

Whereas, the Government of Ontario in its budget of April 11, 2019, initiated a Public Health Modernization process which included a change in municipal cost-sharing from 25% of mandatory public health programs covered by municipalities to 30% of almost all public health programs based on 2018 third quarter spending levels; and
Whereas, on August 21, 2020, the Ministry of Health (Ministry) announced that provincial mitigation funding would be provided to offset the increase to municipal cost- sharing for 2020 and 2021; and
Whereas the COVID-19 pandemic, which started in early 2020, has further affected municipalities’ ability to pay levy increases, has stalled modernization processes, increased the cost-of-living, and affected the health and well-being of the public, and more specifically, public health clients and staff;
Therefore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound supports the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Units call per letter and resolution attached, to return to the 2018 cost-sharing formulas at 25% – 75%, with 100% provincially funded program; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved that the Town of Parry Sound supports mitigation funding continue for 2022 to eliminate the additional financial burden of a 42-50% levy increase to the 31 member municipalities of the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit, if it is not possible to return to the 2018 cost-sharing formula with 100% provincially funded programs; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound requests the 2022 public health funding include increases to reflect cost-of-living increases, public health program changes related to ongoing COVID-19 response, and funding to assist with program and community recovery efforts; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound requests a base funding increase to fund an Associate Medical Officer of Health to support the Medical Officer of Health with the continual demands of 24/7 on call coverage that have been highlighted throughout the COVID-19 pandemic; and
Furthermore, be it Resolved, that the Town of Parry Sound sends a copy of this resolution to the Minister of Health, to the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit, and member municipalities within the said Health Unit.

9.5.2. – Requesting new Accommodation Review Committee for Proposed School.
Resolution

WHEREAS our schools are a vital part of the educational, social and economic development that is integral to the West Parry Sound area municipalities;
AND WHEREAS an Accommodation Review Committee (ARC) was established in 2013 to review Nobel and McDougall elementary schools;
AND WHEREAS the Near North District School Board (NNDSB) included the Parry Sound High School (PSHS) within the same ARC as Nobel and McDougall elementary schools;
AND WHEREAS in 2018 the Ministry of Education put a moratorium on the closing of any schools in the Province of Ontario;
AND WHEREAS after the moratorium by the Province, and based on an outdated ARC, the NNDSB has announced the closure of Nobel and McDougall elementary schools for a junior kindergarten to grade 12 mega school at the location of the PSHS;
AND WHEREAS the preliminary design plans for a new mega-school does not reflect the growth for the West Parry Sound area over the past 8 years;
AND WHEREAS the ratepayers of West Parry Sound contribute over $15 million dollars annually towards local education;
AND WHEREAS the NNDSB has not communicated adequately with the municipal governments and residents in which the schools are located;
AND WHEREAS the elementary students and their parents from the West Parry Sound area deserve to have their voices heard in respect to the location and design of a new mega school;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound requests that the Near North District School Board convene a new Accommodation Review Committee for the junior kindergarten to grade 12 mega school;
AND FURTHER THAT an independent study of enrollment and population figures be completed prior to the finalization of the JK-12 mega school;
AND FURTHER THAT this resolution be forwarded to the West Parry Sound Municipalities, Shawanaga First Nation, Wasauksing First Nation, Henvey Inlet First Nation, Magnetawan First Nation, Moose Deer Point First Nation, The Near North District School Board, the Honourable Doug Ford, Premier of Ontario, the Honourable Stephen Lecce, Minister of Education, Parry Sound-Muskoka MP Scott Aitchison, and Parry Sound-Muskoka MPP Norm Miller.

9.5.3 – National Forest Week.
Resolution
WHEREAS forests cover 66% of the province and 71.1 million hectares, and are an indispensable source of ecological, cultural, health, social and economic benefit,
WHEREAS Ontario’s forests are also located on the traditional territory of diverse Indigenous nations and provide nourishment and cultural value to these groups,
WHEREAS Parry Sound’s forested greenspaces offer valuable recreational opportunities for its residents and visitors,
WHEREAS Parry Sound’s urban forests are not only a center for physical, mental and social wellbeing but also a contributor of essential ecological services for the town such as pollution reduction, stormwater retention, cooling and wildlife habitat,
WHEREAS: National Forest Week with the theme this year of “Our Forests – Continually Giving”, is an annual one-week campaign which recognizes the critical contribution of forests to Canada and its people,
THEREFORE the Council of the Town of Parry Sound declares September 19–25, 2021 as: “NATIONAL FOREST WEEK” in Parry Sound.

9.5.4 – National Rail Safety Week.
Resolution

Whereas Rail Safety Week is to be held across Canada from September 20 to 26, 2021;
Whereas it is in the public’s interest to raise citizens’ awareness of the dangers of ignoring safety warnings at level crossings and trespassing on rail property to reduce avoidable deaths, injuries and damage caused by incidents involving trains and citizens;
Whereas Operation Lifesaver is a public/private partnership whose aim is to work with the public, rail industry, governments, police services, media and others to raise rail safety awareness;
Whereas CN has requested Town Council adopt this resolution in support of its ongoing efforts to raise awareness, save lives and prevent injuries in communities, including our municipality;
Now Therefore it is hereby RESOLVED to support national Rail Safety Week to be held from September 20 to 26, 2021.

By-laws
10.1.1 – New Parks By-law for the Town of Parry Sound.

By-law 2021 – 7145
Being a by-law to regulate the use of Public Parks.

10.1.2 – Salt Dock Inspection.
By-law 2021 – 7146
Being a By-law to authorize a transfer from the Smelter Wharf Reserve Fund for an inspection of the Smelter Wharf

10.1.3 – Zoning By-law Amendment – William Street (Robert L Tudhope LK&K Inv Ltd.).
By-Law 2021 – 7148
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Z/21/03 – William Street (Robert L Tudhope LK&K Inv Ltd.)

10.3.1 – Asset Management Plan Progress and Strategic Asset Management Policy Update.
By-law 2021 – 7147
Being a By-law to approve an updated Strategic Asset Management Policy for the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound.

Cold Wet Feet?

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One of the biggest local news items of the past month has received remarkably little press coverage and municipal comment since the initial announcement. I am referring to the news that West Parry Sound municipalities had been successful in their application for a major grant from the Ontario government to build a new recreation centre (“da pool”).

Why the lack of follow up information about da pool and the upcoming schedule? One might think that this should in the news as much as the new school.

I suspect that there may be a case of cold wet feet among the various municipalities. We know that Whitestone has backed away from the initial level of support they offered. Rather than a cost sharing of the initial construction and an ongoing share of expenses they have offered a one-time investment in the project. Are the other municipalities thinking the same thing with a hope that they can leave the Town of Parry Sound holding the bag for operational cost and construction overruns?

It’s a tricky situation for the municipalities where seasonal residents have a disproportionate influence on municipal priorities and budgets. These seasonal folks for the most part don’t want access to a pool and recreation centre. In the summer they want to be on a lake or the bay, and in the winter, they have access to similar facilities back in the GTA. What they really want is lower taxes and cheaper/better internet. Da pool will increase taxes and have no impact on their internet.

Be careful what you ask for, you might get it, seems to capture the current situation. In the Town of Parry Sound we are familiar with larger projects and the associated costs. Our neighbours, except for their permanent residents, have no need for large capital projects or additional social services if they come with additional taxes. Even with a low tax rate a 1% increase in taxes for da pool can seem a cost too much if you have a $2 million ‘cottage’.

If you go back and read my comments about da pool, you will discover I have evolved on the issue. I am still not a big fan of da pool, but I recognize that it is important for many in the community. As member of the community, I am willing to accept the reality of da pool, the costs it will bring, and move on. My taxes will go up, but if it makes life better for the community it will be worth it.

Property Values and Assessments
I wonder what is going to happen with taxes and property valuations after the next IMPAC assessments. Property values have been skyrocketing in the area. It would not be unreasonable to think that property values have increased by 30% since the last assessment. If IMPAC increases property assessments to account for the increase in valuations, there will be a 30% increase in property taxes if tax rates are kept constant. That may mean we will be entering a phase where councils will be lowering tax rates, but taxes will still go up. Not quite Three-card Monte, but there is no way that taxes are going down regardless of tax rates reductions. It will be even more interesting because assessment increases are applied over a four-year period and will doubtless be applicable to almost all properties.

Let’s See What Happens
I’m looking forward to getting updates on da pool. I also expect that I will be reading about the ‘squirming’ our neighbours will be doing. The Town needs to hang tight and not agree to any proposed renegotiation that leaves the Town on the hook for a higher share of expenses. As they say in poker, if you don’t know who the sucker is, it’s you.

Council Minutes (Abridged) – June 15, 2021

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There were no surprises at this week’s meeting of Council. An abridged version of the official minutes is presented below.

Abridged Meeting Minutes

Closed Session
a) the security of property of the municipality or local board, (systems software);
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes, (proposed acquisition of land for municipal purposes);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board; (trips & falls report);
h) information explicitly supplied in confidence to the municipality or local board by Canada, a province or territory or a Crown agency of any of them, (Town application with respect to removal from a Board);
i) a trade secret or scientific, technical, commercial, financial or labour relations information, supplied in confidence to the municipality or local board, which, if disclosed, could reasonably be expected to prejudice significantly the competitive position or interfere significantly with the contractual or other negotiations of a person, group of persons, or organization, (sponsorship agreement).
Carried

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 – In response to Mayor McGarvey’s inquiry regarding progress on the Ministry of the Solicitor General’s Community Safety and Wellbeing Plan, mandated for every municipality, Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson reported that the goal of these plans is to achieve sustainable communities where families and individuals are able to meet their needs with respect to such things as education, health care, housing, social and cultural expression. The Town and all West Parry Sound municipalities are participating with the OPP as a primary partner, as well as with health, mental health, education and social services agencies and First Nations. An ad hoc committee composed of those agencies and municipal representatives including Brian Leduc from McDougall, Gord Harrison from Carling and Mr. Thompson himself have held preliminary meetings. Surveys asking people and community group representatives to identify where they see gaps in their community with respect to safety and well-being and what solutions they suggest will be issued soon. When this feedback is received the ad hoc committee will analyse and compile the data and create a draft plan for further review with a goal to finalize the plan by November, 2021.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the status of pavement line painting and fluorescent markings throughout Town, Director of Public Works Mike Kearns reported that staff look after stop blocks and parking areas, and that line painting and turning arrows are contracted out; turning arrows were painted through Town over the last couple of weeks, with the line painting crew to follow. Staff paint stop blocks and parking areas as soon as possible and when the weather cooperates.
Fluorescent marks on sidewalks are meant to draw attention to surface discontinuity to provide for a safer walking surface and are considered a treatment under legislation regarding minimum maintenance standards. Staff will mark and then revisit to repair or mitigate the hazard more permanently at a later date, once prioritized.

3.2.3 – With respect to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the Tuesday Farmers’ Market, a response was given that the plan is for it to operate on Tuesdays during the months of July and August, with some vendors already signed up.

Correspondence
4.1 – Reg Goslett.

Public boat launch overnight parking prohibition concerns for Mill Lake Boat launch, with a suggestion that the Town consider issuing one parking pass per water access property owner that may need to park at this location.
Forwarded to By-law Enforcement

4.2 – Joanne Shalla and another signatory.
Support for Town’s position to deny building of a vehicular bridge over the Fitness Trail.
Filed

4.3 – Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM).
Congratulations for achieving Milestone 1 for community Greenhouse Gas Emissions.
Filed

Deputations
None

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda
7.1 – Mastercard Sponsorship Agreement.
By-law 2021-7143
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with Mastercard International Inc. pertaining to sponsorship at the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – 2020 Annual Investment Report.

Resolution
That Council accepts the 2020 Annual Investment Report attached as Schedule A, in accordance with Town’s Investment Policy.
Carried

9.3.1 – Lakeland Holding Ltd. – letter of support for funding application to Natural Resources Canada’s Zero Emissions Vehicle Infrastructure Program.
Resolution
That Council authorize the Mayor to endorse and sign a letter of support, attached as Schedule “A”, to Lakeland Holding Ltd. to support Lakeland’s application to Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) under the Zero Emissions Vehicle Infrastructure Program.
Carried

9.3.2 – Blue Box Transition Update.
Resolution
That Council receive the June 15, 2021 update report on the Blue Box Transition for information purposes.
Carried

9.4.1 Emergency Repair – Town Dock Concrete.
Resolution
That Council hereby acknowledges the emergency repair required to the Town Dock concrete; and authorizes the reallocation of $15,600 in funds from the approved Town Dock Lights/Electrical capital project to be used for the concrete stabilization;
And further that Council directs staff to engage DFO in cost sharing discussions for more significant repairs to the Town Dock deck and bollards.
Carried

9.4.2 – Lighthouse Condominium Exemption.
Resolution
Whereas Sections 51 and 51.1 of the Planning Act can require the approval of a condominium to adhere to the same process as a plan of subdivision;
Whereas often condominiums are already constructed, and all municipal matters are addressed via an Agreement under Section 41 of the Planning Act, and a Condominium agreement would be redundant; and
Whereas the Lighthouse Condominium (20 Salt Dock Road) has a registered Site Plan Agreement with the Town and Section 9(3) of the Condominium Act permits an approval authority to exempt condominium descriptions from the requirements of Section 51 of the Planning Act.
Now Therefore Be it Resolved that the Council for the Town of Parry Sound hereby recommends the exemption of the Lighthouse Condominium (20 Salt Dock Road) to the Parry Sound Area Planning Board.
Carried

9.4.3 – Pop Up Patios – Waiving of Fees.
Resolution
That the Council of the Town of Parry Sound waive fees for the Pop-Up Patio program for the 2021 season.
Carried

9.5.1 – National Indigenous Peoples Day Proclamation.
Resolution
WHEREAS in 1996, the government of Canada declared June 21st National Aboriginal Day, renamed in 2017 to National Indigenous Peoples Day, to celebrate the contribution of Indigenous peoples to Canadian society as Canada’s First Peoples, and to recognize their different cultures;
AND WHEREAS in the Constitution of Canada “Aboriginal peoples of Canada” include First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples;
AND WHEREAS the Indigenous Peoples of Canada have made and continue to make valuable contributions to Canadian society, and it is considered appropriate that there be, in each year, a day to mark and celebrate these contributions;
AND WHEREAS many Indigenous peoples celebrate the summer solstice, which has an important symbolism within their cultures;
AND WHEREAS the Town of Parry Sound will continue its efforts to strengthen partnerships with other levels of government, community organizations, as well as the public and private sectors, to honour and protect the rights of Indigenous Peoples.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Town of Parry Sound hereby proclaims June 21st, 2021 to be: “National Indigenous Peoples Day” in the Town of Parry Sound.
Carried

By-laws
10.2.1 – By-law to specify claw back percentages for 2021 property taxes.
By-Law 2021 – 7141
Being a By-law to Specify the “Claw-back Percentages” in Respect of Properties in the Commercial Class for 2021 Taxation Year.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.3.1 Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts change to Internet Service Provider.
By-law 2021 – 7142
Being a bylaw to authorize the execution of Service Agreement with Vianet Inc. for wireless internet provision at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts.
Passed, Signed & Sealed

Council Agenda Preview – June 15, 2021

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Strange, but the June 1st council meeting minutes have not yet been issued. I may send a note to the town if they aren’t up by Tuesday.

There is nothing controversial or surprising in this week’s meeting agenda, but you may disagree. Take a look at the abridged council agenda below to see if there is anything you feel requires a call to the Town Office or one of the Councillors.

Actually, the first item on the Closed Meeting agenda is worth a comment:
a) the security of property of the municipality or local board, (systems software)
I suspect this item is related to the rash of ransomware attacks on public and private businesses. While this may seem to be an issue for larger ‘operations’, it is a good idea to have your computer systems backed up and stored offline so that you can recover from a hack. Hackers, or at least ‘baby hackers’, will often go after individuals just for practice and sport. If you have your system backed up it is not difficult to get back online even if you need to install a new hard drive.
Remember, don’t reuse passwords and keep a record of your logins in a safe location; which doesn’t include a file on your computer. I have found that 1Password, a Toronto based company, offers one of the very best password manager programs that works across Windows, Mac, Android and iOS.

Abridged Council Agenda

Closed Meeting
a) the security of property of the municipality or local board, (systems software);
c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purposes, (proposed acquisition of land for municipal purposes); 1
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board; (trips & falls report)
i) a trade secret or scientific, technical, commercial, financial or labour relations information, supplied in confidence to the municipality or local board, which, if disclosed, could reasonably be expected to prejudice significantly the competitive position or interfere significantly with the contractual or other negotiations of a person, group of persons, or organization, (sponsorship agreement).

Correspondence
4.1 – Reg Goslett.

Public boat launch overnight parking prohibition concerns.

4.2 – Joanne Shalla.
Support for Town’s position to deny building of a vehicular bridge over the Fitness Trail.

4.3 – Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM).
Congratulations for achieving Milestone 1 for community Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

Deputations
None Scheduled

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.2.1 – 2020 Annual Investment Report.
Resolution

That Council accepts the 2020 Annual Investment Report attached as Schedule A, in accordance with Town’s Investment Policy.

9.3.1 – Lakeland Holding Ltd. – letter of support for funding application to Natural Resources Canada’s Zero Emissions Vehicle Infrastructure Program.
Resolution

That Council authorize the Mayor to endorse and sign a letter of support, attached as Schedule “A”, to Lakeland Holding Ltd. to support Lakeland’s application to Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) under the Zero Emissions Vehicle Infrastructure Program.

9.3.2 – Blue Box Transition Update.
Resolution

That Council receive the June 15, 2021 update report on the Blue Box Transition for information purposes.

9.4.1 – Emergency Repair – Town Dock Concrete.
Resolution

That Council hereby acknowledges the emergency repair required to the Town Dock concrete; and authorizes the reallocation of $15,600 in funds from the approved Town Dock Lights/Electrical capital project to be used for the concrete stabilization;
And further that Council directs staff to engage DFO in cost sharing discussions for more significant repairs to the Town Dock deck and bollards.

9.4.2 – Lighthouse Condominium Exemption.
Resolution

Whereas Sections 51 and 51.1 of the Planning Act can require the approval of a condominium to adhere to the same process as a plan of subdivision;
Whereas often condominiums are already constructed, and all municipal matters are addressed via an Agreement under Section 41 of the Planning Act, and a Condominium agreement would be redundant; and
Whereas the Lighthouse Condominium (20 Salt Dock Road) has a registered Site Plan Agreement with the Town and Section 9(3) of the Condominium Act permits an approval authority to exempt condominium descriptions from the requirements of Section 51 of the Planning Act.
Now Therefore Be it Resolved that the Council for the Town of Parry Sound hereby recommends the exemption of the Lighthouse Condominium (20 Salt Dock Road) to the Parry Sound Area Planning Board.

9.5.1 – National Indigenous Peoples Day Proclamation.
Resolution

WHEREAS in 1996, the government of Canada declared June 21st National Aboriginal Day, renamed in 2017 to National Indigenous Peoples Day, to celebrate the contribution of Indigenous peoples to Canadian society as Canada’s First Peoples, and to recognize their different cultures;
AND WHEREAS in the Constitution of Canada “Aboriginal peoples of Canada” include First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples;
AND WHEREAS the Indigenous Peoples of Canada have made and continue to make valuable contributions to Canadian society, and it is considered appropriate that there be, in each year, a day to mark and celebrate these contributions;
AND WHEREAS many Indigenous peoples celebrate the summer solstice, which has an important symbolism within their cultures;
AND WHEREAS the Town of Parry Sound will continue its efforts to strengthen partnerships with other levels of government, community organizations, as well as the public and private sectors, to honour and protect the rights of Indigenous Peoples.
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Town of Parry Sound hereby proclaims June 21st, 2021 to be: “National Indigenous Peoples Day” in the Town of Parry Sound.

By-laws
10.2.1 – By-law to specify claw back percentages for 2021 property taxes.
By-Law 2021 – 7141
Being a By-law to Specify the “Claw-back Percentages” in Respect of Properties in the Commercial Class for 2021 Taxation Year.

10.3.1 – Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts change to Internet Service Provider.
By-law 2021 – 7142
Being a bylaw to authorize the execution of Service Agreement with Vianet Inc. for wireless internet provision at the Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts.

Council Agenda Preview – June 1, 2021

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A few things caught my eye on this week’s agenda. See the agenda items that follow for more information:

9.5.2 – Establishment of Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee.
10.3.2 – Rail Safety Improvement Program Agreement

Abridged Agenda

Closed Session
d) labour relations or employee negotiations, (CUPE Collective Agreement Negotiations);
k) a position, plan, procedure, criteria or instruction to be applied to any negotiations carried on or to be carried on by or on behalf of the municipality or local board, (municipal shared services);

Public Meeting
2.1 – Zoning Bylaw Amendment Z/21-03 William St (Robert L. Tudhope KL&K Inv Ltd.)
Council will hold a public meeting to consider a proposed Zoning By-law amendment under Section 34 of the Planning Act. The purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law amendment is to change the zoning of the property from Residential Medium Density (R2) to General Commercial (C1).

Correspondence
4.1 – Municipality of McDougall
Official Plan Review Notice.

4.2 – Township of Joly
Vaccine allocation Prioritization.

4.3 – Jane Hinchliffe
Concerns with condition of 40 Waubeek St. lot post- construction work.

4.4 – Jim MacCoubrey, Flora & V. Borecky
Support for Town’s position to deny building of a vehicular bridge over the Fitness Trail.

4.5 – Varqa Kanani
Housing crisis.

Deputations
5.1 – Staff Sgt. Jeremy McDonald, OPP

Introduction.

5.2 – Chair Jay Aspin, Vice-Chair John Cochrane, Director Craig Myles, Acting Superintendent Gay Smylie, Near North District School Board
Parry Sound High School Reconstruction.

5.3 – Chair Aleesha Clarke, Absolutely Georgian Bay
Co-op membership and 2021 budget request.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Integrity Commissioner Report, 2020.

Resolution
That Council accepts the Integrity Commissioner Report for 2020 as follows:
1 dated complaint which was dismissed 2 requests for advice.

9.4.1 – Consent Application B/17/2021 – Hall.
Resolution 2021
That Council of the Town of Parry Sound recommends approval of B17/2021(PS) – Hall (Halls Quarry Road).

9.4.2 – Consent Application – B 20/2021 (PS) (Jackson).
Resolution

That the Council of the Town of Parry Sound recommends approval of a decision on Consent Application No. B 20/2021 (PS) Jackson (53 Isabella Street) be approved subject to:
That the resultant lot layout ensures all Zoning By-law requirements are satisfied, or relief from the Zoning By-law be obtained.

9.4.3 – Di Salvo’s Curbside Cucina (Food Truck) Mobile Food Service.
Resolution

That Council of the Town of Parry Sound authorize the issuance of a business license to Di Salvo’s Curbside Cucina (Food Truck) for the operation of Mobile Food Service on the leased Federal property at the Town Dock.

9.5.1 – National Suicide Helpline.
Resolution

WHEREAS the Federal government has passed a motion to adopt 9-8-8, a National three-digit suicide and crisis hotline; and
WHEREAS the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has increased the demand for suicide prevention services by 200%; and
WHEREAS existing suicide prevention hotlines require the user to remember a 10-digit number and go through directories or be placed on hold; and
WHEREAS in 2022 the United States will have in place a national 9-8-8 crisis hotline; and
WHEREAS the Town of Parry Sound recognizes that it is a significant and important initiative to ensure critical barriers are removed to those in a crisis and seeking help;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Town of Parry Sound endorses this 9-8-8 crisis line initiative; and
THAT Staff be directed to send a letter indicating such support to our local Member of Parliament, Member(s) of the Legislative Assembly, Federal Minister of Health, the CRTC and local area municipalities to indicate our support.

9.5.2 – Establishment of Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee.
Resolution

Whereas the Town is located in the heart of the Georgian Bay Biosphere; and
Whereas the Georgian Bay Biosphere is a region of global ecological significance that has an ongoing commitment to the United Nations and sustainability; and
Whereas environmental stewardship and protection are strategic priorities for the Town; and
Whereas access to and the use of the waterfront is integral to the Town’s identity; and
Whereas the Town has a diverse and active waterfront user and business community;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT staff be directed to prepare a report and recommendation on the value of an Ad hoc Waterfront Advisory Committee to advise on matters relating to environmental stewardship, beautification and creating a people gathering place; and
FURTHER That subject to a recommended establishment of such a committee, staff prepare recommended Terms of Reference, including committee composition, recruitment, the area to be defined as waterfront and other details as deemed appropriate.

9.5.3 – Local Long-Term Care Initiatives.
Resolution
WHEREAS Ontario’s Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission’s final report has now been delivered and health system leaders in West Parry Sound want to be prepared for the changes that are expected to come; and
WHEREAS health authorities of the West Parry Sound District are working together, including the Boards of the West Parry Sound Health Centre, Lakeland Long Term Care and Belvedere Heights Long Term Care, with a vision to provide the best possible solution to Long Term Care and health care for the seniors in our community; and
WHEREAS among considerations being proposed is a new model of health Care, “a Campus of Care”, which essentially provides a continuum of care for the elderly to age in place including, where appropriate, their own apartments, other independent or assisted living arrangements as well as Long Term Care, all affiliated with and in proximity to local primary health care and wellness services; and
WHEREAS it is also proposed that the community of seniors continuing to live at home be supported by our vision of virtual care which would include professional home-based health and wellness care supported by high speed internet services;
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Town of Parry Sound supports these initiatives and the collaborative efforts between the Province of Ontario and the local stakeholders to develop innovative and improved care for the seniors in our community.

9.5.4 – Letter of Support for Park 2 Park Trail Association Grant Application.
Resolution

That in response to Park 2 Park Trail Association’s request, Council of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby authorize the drafting of a letter of support for Park to Park Trail Association’s grant application.

By-laws
10.3.1 – Partnership with Science North to Deliver Youth Camp Programs at the Bobby Orr Community Centre.

By-law 2021 – 7137
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with Science North for the delivery of education-based youth camp programming.

10.3.2 – Rail Safety Improvement Program Agreement.
By-law 2021 – 7138
Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with the Minister of Transport regarding a Rail Safety Improvement Program
Resolution
Whereas the Town of Parry Sound has applied and been successful in obtaining funding support from the Transport Canada Rail Safety Improvement Program in the amount of up to $480,000 of the estimated project expenditures, and
Whereas the Town of Parry Sound has committed to an estimated contribution of $270,000 as its portion of the estimated expenditures, and
Whereas the Community desires to encourage safe and active transportation and physical activities by all including the residents of new and previous residential
development and the anticipated increase in student traffic related to the proposed “Mega School” at the corner of Isabella and Joseph Streets, and
Whereas both CN and CP Railways traverse the Municipality creating challenges for road users and pedestrians to access various parts of the Town including the area of the Salt Dock and the nearby Rugged Trail and Fitness Trail to the waterfront, and
Whereas the grade elevation of both tracks contributes significantly to the costs associated with attempts to increase crossing safety including installation of sidewalks and pedestrian access in addition to making improvements to the road approaches;
Therefore, be it resolved that Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby requests that both CN and CP Rail contribute financially to the Rail Safety Improvements at the double crossing at Isabella St.

10.4.1 – Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/21/04 – 9 & 11 Church Street (Matt Ryan for Oleg Gromov).
By-Law 2021 – 7139
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 9 and 11 Church Street (Matt Ryan for Oleg Gromov)
Resolution 2021
That the increase in residential units as noted in the Notice of Complete Application and Public Meeting for Z/21/4 does not require any additional circulation in accordance with Section 34(17) of the Planning Act.

Council Minutes (Abridged) – May 18, 2021

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There is not much of note in this week’s council meeting minutes.

10.4.1 – Zoning By-law Amendment – George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Prasher) – 36 Unit Residential Proposal was approved with what I understand was a change to the placement of the complex to provide a larger buffer with the homes on Forest Street.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged)

Closed Session
b) personal matters about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees, (Performance Reviews re: Director of Finance; Director of Public Works);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (Summons served on Town in response to enforcement of property standards and fire code by-laws)
h) information explicitly supplied in confidence to the municipality or local board by Canada, a province or territory or a Crown agency of any of them, (Parry Sound Area Recreation & Culture Centre update).

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof
1.4.1 – Councillor Horne declared Pecuniary Interest on item 9.2.1 regarding reserve funds returned from Belvedere to participating area municipalities, as the West Parry Sound Health Centre has a management contract with Belvedere Heights and his spouse as Chief Financial Officer of WPSHC participated in the executive committee determining amounts returned to municipalities. Councillor Horne left the meeting for duration of the item, did not participate in discussion, nor vote on the item.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 –
In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry as to whether there was hazardous materials as a result of the demolition of the Friendship Centre, Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson reported that demolition of the building was done with a proper demolition permit and all applicable laws were complied with to obtain the permit and dispose of the building residue.

Correspondence
4.1 – Alhan Rahimi, 59 Emily Street.
Request that Council advocate & adopt policies that support sustainable home price increases.
Acknowledged and Filed

4.2 – Yvonne Heaman.
Support for Town’s denial of construction of a vehicle bridge over Fitness Trail.
Filed

4.3 – Residents petition to Town of Parry Sound.
Refuse the demand for a bridge over the Fitness Trail and Rabbit Canyon, and that Rabbit Canyon remain open.
Filed

Deputations
5.1 – Andrea McIntyre.

Establishing Fundraising efforts to purchase Rabbit Canyon property for Public Use.
Andrea McIntyre addressed Council with a proposal to spearhead a fundraising campaign to purchase the privately owned property adjacent to the Fitness Trail known as Rabbit Canyon, to donate to the Town. Ms. McIntyre suggested that the owner might be willing to sell if costs could be recouped, and that according to her research she believes the assessed value of the land is $95,000. Ms. McIntyre requested the Town’s approval to move ahead with this initiative.
Several members of Council commended Ms. McIntyre on the initiative, suggested that prior to starting efforts, there be a firm agreement with the owner on the purchase and sale. In response to a Councillor request for a legal opinion, Director of Development & Protective Services Dave Thompson noted that staff would review the process, obtain a legal opinion as needed and respond to Ms. McIntyre.

5.2 – Diana Clements, Principal Parry Sound Forest School.
Request for “Children at Play Sign” on Parry Sound Drive.
Diana Clements addressed Council with a slide presentation regarding Parry Sound Forest School. The school building is located outside Canadore College out of which programs run, taking children into the outdoors, familiarizing them with activities such as handling wildlife, tree climbing, whittling, which in turn helps them use gross motor skills, and teaches them perseverance, problem solving, and how to take risks, in contrast to current-day children activities which are centered around screen time. Groups to a maximum size of 15-18 students, aged toddlers up to grade six, use the forest around the area, go around the pond and walk along Parry Sound Drive to complete the loop. Although there have been no incidents, Ms. Clements requested that signage be installed along Parry Sound Drive, alerting drivers to children in the area, with a request to slow down.
After confirming with Director of Public Works that a by-law is not needed to install a warning sign (as opposed to regulatory signs), Mayor McGarvey obtained Council’s agreement to have staff review the situation with an aim to install appropriate signage to alert drivers of children in the area.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Delegation Topics for the 2021 AMO Conference.

Direction for staff follow-up
That staff be directed to submit a request to delegate with the appropriate Provincial Minister a the AMO 2021 Conference on the following topics:
1. Property tax exemption under Section 3(1)12iii of the Assessment Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. A.31, “Relief of the Poor; and
2. Curbing the rising cost of municipal insurance premiums.
Carried

9.2.1 – Reserve funds returned from Belvedere to participating area municipalities.
Resolution
That Council approves the transfer of $ $61,684 received from Belvedere to a Long- Term Care Reserve for the purpose of assisting in offsetting any future levy increases.
Carried

9.4.1 – Request to stop-up and close a portion of the Ashwood Drive Road Allowance.
Resolution

That Council of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound directs staff to bring a stop- up-and-closure By-law for the Ashwood Drive Road (Themer, 60a Seguin Street) allowance, and further that
1. The applicant submits a deposit of $5,000 to pay for the costs associated with public advertisement, an appraisal, and legal costs;
2. Assuming arrangements can be negotiated to the Town’s satisfaction, that the survey and transaction ensure that a 7.7 metre-wide strip of land be deeded to 58 Seguin Street, that any historic encroachments from 60 Seguin Street be deeded accordingly, and that the balance of the lands be deeded to 60a Seguin Street; and
3. Any easements for utilities and services be surveyed and registered accordingly.
Carried

9.5.1 – Request Approval for Temporary Storage of Asbestos at Airport.
Resolution

THAT Whereas the Municipality of McDougall in a letter dated March 25, 2021, has authorized Soundseals Insulation to dispose of non-hazardous materials and asbestos material per regulations at the McDougall Landfill Site at 214 McDougall Road; and
Whereas Soundseals Insulation has submitted a request to the Town of Parry Sound and to the Township of Seguin for permission to temporarily store asbestos at their facilities located at the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport, owned jointly by the Town of Parry Sound, and the Township of Seguin; and
Whereas the Town has been advised that storage of said asbestos is anticipated to occur only in cases where Soundseals Insulation has been unable to meet the day-end closure time of the McDougall Landfill Site and that asbestos will remain in vehicles within its closed and locked facility at the Airport for next earliest delivery and disposal at the McDougall Landfill Site , and
Whereas the Municipal Airport Commission is responsible for overseeing the operation the Municipal Airport; and
Whereas the Town has been advised that the Municipal Airport Commission has agreed to this proposal so long as Soundseals operates in accordance with regulations;
Now therefore the Town of Parry Sound, as joint landowner of the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport, hereby agrees to permit Soundseals Insulation to store asbestos in its vehicles and parked within its locked facilities at the Municipal Airport for earliest transport and disposal at the McDougall Landfill Site, upon the following conditions:
That the Township of Seguin provides similar approval;
That Soundseals Insulation abides by all regulations, and all necessary approvals remain in force;
That prior to expiry, Soundseals Insulation provides to the Town annually, a copy of its Certificate of Insurance in an amount no less than $5 million, adding the Town of Parry Sound as an additional insured;
That the Parry Sound Area Municipal Airport Commission as landlord, enters into an amended lease agreement with Soundseals Insulation, naming the Town of Parry Sound and the Township of Seguin as additional insured, the requirement to annually provide a Certificate of Insurance to the land owners and any other amendments the Commission deems appropriate.
Carried

9.5.2 Enforcement of By-laws.
Resolution

That staff respond to by-law complaints utilizing an enforcement approach consistent with established practice for all complaints without regard for expected future changes to existing bylaws.
Carried

9.5.3 – OPP Detachment Board Proposal.
Resolution

That Whereas the Community Safety and Policing Act, (CSPA), 2019 calls for the end of Community Police Advisory Committees (CPACs) and the creation of Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Detachment Boards; and
Whereas the Ministry of the Solicitor General has developed an OPP detachment board framework that will allow affected municipalities and First Nations the flexibility to create a board that reflects community and local needs, and
Whereas the Ministry of the Solicitor General has asked municipalities and First Nations within a detachment area to work together to determine the composition of their board and the manner in which they will submit their proposal to the Ministry; and
Whereas members of the existing West Parry Sound District CPAC have indicated interest in establishing a Board representative of CPAC municipalities and First Nations,
Now Therefore Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby supports submission by the CPAC representative from the Municipality of McDougall to the Province of Ontario, the Ontario Provincial Police Detachment Board Proposal substantially in the form attached, representing the 7 West Parry Sound Area municipalities and Henvey Inlet First Nation with the following additional considerations/proposals:
1. That the following be included as administrative resources/infrastructure required to support the establishment of the detachment board:
a) administrative support for taking minutes of meetings, prepare, distribute and publish agendas and meeting notices, prepare draft policy documents, administer expenses, prepare annual reports and cost estimates, and maintain board records;
b) secure place for records, meeting location, electronic requirements;
c) establish funding requirements;
d) personal accident insurance;
e) legal advice;
f) honorariums;
g) ongoing training;
h) travel and meals;
i) advertising; and
j) any other administrative resources/infrastructure common to a Board;
That it be clarified with the province, that funding for these resources/infrastructure be through the province as the establishment of detachment boards is an initiative of the province;
3. That in an effort to reduce duplication of effort and training, that the Board be established upon the 2022 Municipal Election;
And Further that this resolution be forwarded to the municipalities within the West Parry Sound District and Henvey Inlet First Nation.
Carried

9.5.4 – Proclamation of June as Pride Month.
Resolution

WHEREAS the month of June is recognized as Pride Month, a time for the world’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, Questioning, Two Spirit communities (LGBTQ2St) and Allies to celebrate diversity;
AND WHEREAS many strides have been made in overcoming prejudice, and in creating inclusive policies and law, and more work needs to be done;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Council of Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound does hereby proclaim June 2021 as Pride Month and encourages citizens to commit to continuing awareness, inclusion, and acceptance for all members of our community regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.
Carried

By-laws
10.2.1 – Striking tax rates for fiscal year 2021.

By-law 2021 – 7131
Being a bylaw to Strike the Tax Rates for Municipal Purposes for the Year 2021.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.2.2 – Business Improvement Area (BIA) Levy By-law – Downtown Business Area.
By-law 2021 – 7132
Being a By-law to adopt the estimates of the Board of Management of the Downtown Parry Sound Business Improvement Area and to strike the tax rate thereon for the year 2021.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.3.1 – Provincial Fuel Tax Rebate Agreement.
By-law 2021 – 7134
Being a By-law to authorize an Agreement with Holly Transportation Services Inc. for Provincial Fuel Tax Rebate.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.3.2 – TOPdesk Information Technology Service Management and Asset Management system procurement through the Ontario Education Collaborative Market Place (OECM).
By-law 2021 – 7135
Being a bylaw to authorize the execution of a Master Agreement, and Customer Supplier Agreement with TOPdesk Canada Inc. for a user support ticket and inventory management software.
Passed, Signed and Sealed

10.4.1 – Zoning By-law Amendment – George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Prasher) – 36 Unit Residential Proposal.
By-Law 2021 – 7133
Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for George Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on behalf of Prasher).
Passed, Signed and Sealed