Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – December 3, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , ,

It seems last Tuesday’s meeting was a bit of a marathon in terms of the deputations. There continue to be requests made by the social service and not-for-profit sectors who serve much more than the Town itself to provide services, support and/or considerations. It’s a bit of a Catch-22. These organizations do not pay taxes but occupy prime real estate that is not available for uses that would provide the Town with revenues to provide the requested services. The Town of Parry Sound property tax rates are more than 100% higher than some of the surrounding municipalities, and no less than 50% higher than the others, not because we are spendthrifts but because we are effectively required to provide support to the organizations that service the District, not just the Town.

And now we are looking at taking on the largest individual municipal share of a multi-municipal aquatic and wellness centre. We can’t afford everything, and I think the locals would revolt if there were cutbacks in local services like snow management to subsidize organizations that support a much larger district wide population.

Thanks to the Town Clerk for the summaries of the deputations. I suggest you watch them live for their full impact. Here is the link on YouTube.

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof
1.4.1 – Councillor Horne Declared Pecuniary Interest on item 9.2.1; the land ambulance budget was developed in conjunction with the West Parry Sound Health Centre, as his spouse Heidi Stephenson is the Chief Operating Officer of WPSHC.

Questions of Staff
3.2.1 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry as to how things went with the last snowfall and whether there was any change with respect to citizens’ response to the request for patience, Director of Public Works Peter Brown reported the following: the snow event in question started on Sunday afternoon, response was a bit slower than usual because of the amount of snow that fell. A truck was out until 11:30 pm with a full crew on at 4:00 am. There were a few phone calls received with one being very rude and extremely abusive to staff. Someone took a swing with a shovel at the wing of a plow, and Mr. Brown indicated that if that happens again, he has instructed staff to call the OPP. People are shovelling snow onto town streets after a plow has gone by which is an offense under the Highway Traffic Act. There are still problems on Belvedere Ave., as it is difficult to get through with a 7 ton. Mr. Brown appealed to people to be patient and urged Council members to take a turn in the wing seat this winter to learn what staff are up against, to which Councillors Keith and Backman responded that they would take up that opportunity.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry regarding the status of Belvedere Ave. vis-à-vis 1-way vs. 2-way street, Mr. Brown reported that he regrets that the issue of returning Belvedere Ave. to a 2-way street was not completed during his time as Director of Public Works. Mr. Brown reported that it is extremely difficult to drive the 7- ton truck through this street at anytime, and he advocated that the street be returned to a 2-way street, and that on street parking be eliminated in winter months.

Correspondence
4.1 – Eric McIntyre. Request for improving and installing sidewalks; areas cited include Avenue Road, Margaret, Marion, Ethel and Victoria Streets.

4.2 – Honourable Stephen Lecce, Minister of Education. Response to Town inquiry on status update on consolidated school project.

4.3 – Tamara Wilson, Health Outreach Coordinator, Parry Sound Friendship Centre. Warming Centre to accommodate 20 clients overnight.

4.4. – Rick Zanussi, Chair, DSSAB. Request for support of District of Parry Sound Ontario Health Team

Deputations
5.1 –
Tamara Wilson, Health Outreach Coordinator, Parry Sound Friendship Centre. Warming Centre to accommodate 20 clients overnight.
Ms. Wilson addressed Council with respect to the Parry Sound Friendship Centre and partner Mary Street Centre/St. James United Church intention to provide a warming centre for homeless over the coming winter months. Ms. Wilson requested financial support for this project.
In response to inquiries, Ms. Wilson provided the following additional information: In her position as Health Outreach Coordinator, she has done research and consulted with representatives of the Salvation Army and DSSAB and concludes that homelessness in the area is at a crisis point that needs to be addressed. The proposed warming centre is specifically for men, since Esprit Place does exist and takes in women and children, but there is no men’s shelter. Weekly anticipated costs are estimated at $896, with $40 for utilities, $776.05 for 1 staff member for three nights, and $50 for incidentals.
The following motion was made: That the warming centre as identified in correspondence and deputation at the December 3, 2019 Council meeting be considered in budget deliberations for 2020. CarriedIn response to additional inquiries, Ms. Wilson provided the following information:
There is a member of DSSAB on the Committee addressing this issue, and DSSAB has offered to pay for cots and a steamer to clean them. DSSAB has indicated that they have no more additional funding for this project.
The following motion was made: That the Town send a letter to DSSAB reminding them of their role on housing and homelessness and asking them for further support given that they represent the District of Parry Sound where many of the homeless needing shelter may come from. Carried
Again, in response to additional inquiries, Ms. Wilson provided the following information: Trillium Foundation funding has been researched, but unfortunately the process will take so long, that by the time any funding is received, the shelter would be closed. This funding option may be more useful for establishing a permanent shelter. Ms. Wilson has not contacted other municipalities with a similar request for funding, but upon the suggestion from a member of Council, indicated that she would do so. The warming centre is proposed for only Monday-Wednesday to get it up and running and if it goes well, may open for more nights. It is proposed to start on December 9th with volunteers only, because there isn’t the funding yet for staff. When the centre is opened, there will be an intake and registration process that will capture information on the men. Councillor Keith suggested that it would be useful if the intake process captures information on the registrant’s home base, as that information may be useful in determining if x number of people are coming from certain municipalities. Ms. Wilson confirmed that she has called all the churches and there were about 17 in attendance at a first meeting; there are now about 13 people involved with the Committee. Councillor McCann suggested contacting service clubs like the Lions Club and Knights of Columbus who might not be so constrained to a budget process as organizations like the Town are.

5.2 – Deborah Randall-Wood, Chief Nursing Officer and Director Patient & Family Centred Care; Heidi Stephenson, Chief Financial Officer, West Parry Sound Health Ctr. Our Changing Health Care Environment.
Ms. Randall-Wood and Ms. Stephenson addressed Council from a prepared power point presentation on the changing health care environment.
Ms. Stephenson began with an overview of the recent move to electronic health records (EHR) which went live on October 1st, perhaps the biggest transformation since the new health centre opened in 2005. The project began two years ago and in addition to IT staff, involved physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, lab & pharmacy technicians, as well as finance and procurement staff. Ms. Stephenson indicated that they worked with Sault Area Hospital and North Bay Regional Health Centre and because they were the first in the Region to go live, had an extra 50 people on site the first 3 days. 140 nurses were trained with 18 hours of training each. The command centre was running for 24 hours/day for the first 14 days. By 2022, the other 21 hospitals in what was the Northeast LINH will be going live with EHR and will look to what the WPSHC has created.
Ms. Stephenson reported that another big project of the WPSHC is the purchase of a new CT scanner, superior to the current scanner purchased in 2005. The new scanner costs $1.5 million instead of $4 million, has 128 slices instead of 64, and releases a lower radiation dose. Currently there is a trailer parked outside the emergency entrance with a portable CT scanner while the old scanner is being removed.
Ms. Stephenson credited the Foundation and supporters in the area for financially supporting both of these projects and making them happen.
Ms. Randall-Wood addressed Council with respect to changes happening in the Ontario health system, noting that a new agency called Ontario Health has been created to partially replace the LHIN (Local Health Integrated Network). A number of agencies which used to report directly to the Minster of Health, now report to Ontario Health, a transition that has been happening over the last two years. In addition, the LHIN system of 14 regions has been reduced to 5 regions. Parry Sound has remained in the North Region which has a lot of advantages. In so doing, the LHIN functions have carried on as usual with staff transferring to Ontario Health. The only agency which has not yet transferred is the Trillium Gift of Life Network, due to complications in making sure that people who are involved in an organ transplant process are not disrupted.
Ms. Randall-Wood reported that additionally there will be reconfiguration of other systems including public health, land ambulance, and ambulance communication, with public consultation to be undertaken on the future of these services. Ms. Randall-Wood noted that the West Parry Sound Ontario Health Team would be advocating as strongly as possible for services currently managed in Parry Sound to stay in Parry Sound due to efficiencies of that model, as a larger province-wide EMS system doesn’t make sense for rural and northern communities.
Ms. Randall-Wood said that the biggest news is the formation of Ontario Health Teams (OHT) which is different than Ontario Health, the latter being a large provincial organization. OHTs which would still work together, are under Ontario Health.
Ms. Randall-Wood identified the various organizations that worked together in submitting an application to create an Ontario Health Team for West Parry Sound (OHTWPS), and reported that they were assigned by the Ministry of Health the “In Development” status, which means essential elements are in place. Ms. Randall-Wood reported that in actively working on full application, the OHTWPS recognizes that Muskoka, Algonquin, Nipissing and Sudbury are moving forward into “full application” with announcements coming out now.
Working on full application includes recognizing what populations the Team is going to be working with. Ms. Randall-Wood noted that the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) out of the University of Toronto has identified referral patterns. The system therefore is built around where people go for care, starting with primary care where the physician is, then to where the physician sends people; i.e. to where specialists practice. ICES then attributes populations to that. Most physicians in WPS refer people into WPSHC. Specialists who come to work, work within WPSHC. When patients move they tend to go north to Sudbury and south to Royal Victoria, and from time to time to Toronto Sick Kids or to Waypoint. Some patients go to Orillia including high-risk Moms and babies but most referral patterns are north and south, so the Team is trying to understand how to service people in these corridors.
Ms. Randall-Wood noted that the “in development” status allows the Team a chance to watch how other OHTs are developing, and what they are using for governance structure.
Ms. Randall-Wood noted that priorities in the next application stage are seniors and those in long term care, and people living with mental health and addictions issues because of the high population in those two categories.
In response to Council members questions, Ms. Randall-Wood and Ms. Stephenson clarified the structure with Ministry of Health at the top, Ontario Health delivering health care to the population, divided into 5 regions responsible for the business of Ontario Health, with about 40 Ontario Health Teams. The advantage of the OHT is that for the first time all services can be pulled together under one governance structure which will cut down barriers, reduce application processes, time, etc. West Parry Sound was successful in convincing the Ministry of Health that although the area does not meet the suggested minimum population threshold, it constitutes a unique entity, and there is no benefit to enlarging the area and linking with hospitals, north, east or south. Other OHTs have already been approved at full application which also don’t meet the minimum population threshold. With respect to boundary divisions in the district, Ms. Randall- Wood noted that the attributive population is considered; i.e. people in Burk’s Falls would be associated with the Muskoka-Algonquin Health Team; Powassan with Nipissing; and McKellar, Dunchurch and Magnetawan with West Parry Sound.

5.3. – Nick Ryeland, President; Peter Searle, Executive Director & General Manager. Park to Park Trail update and budget.
Mr. Ryeland addressed Council from a prepared power point presentation, providing background on the Park to Park (P2P) Trail Association, noting that they operate over 230 km of highly rated trails just outside of Killbear to just outside of Algonquin Park, in relatively close proximity to Toronto, which brings in tourism, and people looking for an adventure. Mr. Ryeland suggested that the trail contributes culturally, environmentally, economically and socially to the area. The trail essentially runs from Hwy 400 to exit 214, then east to Huntsville – the most populated area of the trail and is used by ATVs dirt bikes, bicyclists, and hikers.
Mr. Ryeland reported that they are seeking an investment from Parry Sound of $6,000 for 2020, more than has been asked for in previous years. Mr. Ryeland noted that most money comes from trail passes sold to ATVers and dirt bikers, and sales in 2019 of $80,000 contributed to 2/3 of revenue. This amount has almost doubled in the last three years, likely as a result of good social media presence, proximity to Toronto and the quality and landscape of the trail. Mr. Ryeland noted that in 2018, the Parry Sound 33 Fire negatively affected trail pass sales, and that the number of passes sold was 952, which jumped in 2019 to 1143, up 19%.
Mr. Ryeland made comparison to Eastern Ontario Trail Alliance which had trail pass sales in excess if $500,000 in 2019 and to the Hatfield McCoy Trails which raised $1,500,000. The P2P annual Father’s Day Rally raised over $10,000 in 2019 and $10,000 donation was received from Henvey Inlet Wind.
Using Ontario’s Tourism Regional Economic Impact Model (TREIM), Mr. Ryeland reported the economic impact of the P2P Trail included total visitor spending of $731,000; full-time employment of 5; retail trade of $50,000; accommodation of $70,000; food & beverage of $50,000 and indirect tax of $106,000.
With respect to social impact, Mr. Ryeland reported that people inevitably go with friends, and/or family.
Mr. Ryeland reported that trail work in 2019 addressed bridges, as P2P manages 14 aging bridges. 4 bridges were re-decked in 2019, with plans to do 4 more in 2020. One additional original rail bridge needs to be replaced in its entirety and is currently closed. P2P is working with the Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs (OFSC) to source funds from the province to complete this expensive work.
In response from Councillor inquiries, Mr. Ryeland confirmed that no funding comes from the province to pay for the P2P trail maintenance, including bridge repairs. P2P trail manages the trail under a land use permit from Ministry of Natural Resources & Forestry (MNRF). For major repairs like the old rail bridge, P2P works with OFSC, and otherwise uses its own funds from trail pass sales and municipal contributions.
Mr. Ryeland noted that the number of volunteer person hours of labour spent on the trail was estimated to be at approximately 1,000.
With respect to the “One Pass” system, being a pass to access various trails, Mr. Ryeland indicated that it has proved be difficult because organizations can be defensive of their trails; P2P is concerned that a pass bought elsewhere to be used here, does not contribute financially to P2P for trail upkeep.
Mr. Ryeland noted that although he doesn’t see ATVs frequently in Parry Sound, the decision by Parry Sound to permit them on Town streets is a forward step as it helps send a message that Parry Sound is open for business and helps build acceptance of the sport.
Councillor Keith suggested that although the cost to maintain the bridges is an issue, the number of bridges might be considered as part of a marketing campaign.
Mr. Ryeland agreed that the main purchases by trail users were for food, gas and lodging, but also suggested that they make other goods and services purchases contributing to the area economy.
In response to an inquiry regarding naming rights and sponsorship, Mr. Ryeland reported that CF Motor, manufacturer of ATVs, is a corporate sponsor and provides 5 side by sides for annual use to work on trails, and that a number of organizations sponsored the Seguin Falls bridge repair in 2007 and they are named on the bridge. Mr. Ryland said that P2P will be making deputations to other municipalities requesting financial assistance.

5.4 – Fritz Distler, Tyson Shurr, Bayside Family Church. Mr. Shurr read from a June 17th, 2019 letter addressed to Council reporting that for the past 9-10 years there have been intermittent problems with their sewer line and sewage pump and that they believe the problems relate to uninsulated sewer lines buried 2′ below ground in front of Bayview and Homestead Plumbing which freeze, reversing pressure back to their location and burning out their pumps, resulting in flooding of their basement.
Mr. Shurr requested that the Town correct the installation of the sewer lines in the low area in front of Salvation Army Thrift Store, Homestead Plumbing and Bayview by providing more insulation or lowering the line; and that the Town consider paying a portion of the approximate $10,500 since 2009 borne by Bayside Family Church for their repairs.
Mr. Distler said that Bay Area got a new grinder pump installed by the Town and that The Salvation Army Thrift Store pump was looked after by the Town.
In response to the Mayor’s invitation to provide more information, Director of Public Works Peter Brown reported that the June 17th letter read from this evening has been responded to by his office with copies already circulated to members of Council. Mr. Brown said that with respect to Bay Area Electric and Bayview, the Town’s agreement with them stipulates that the Town maintains their system. It is clear in the agreement with Bayside Family Church, that the Town does not maintain their system. Mr. Brown indicated that in good faith, the Town has helped Bayside Family Church by providing a pump two times in the last year without charge.
Mr. Brown reported that the forcemain recently installed was a minimum of 6′ deep in most areas and where it was only 5′ deep, was insulated, and the pipe itself in that area had a layer of insulation. Mr. Brown reported that in addition, a check valve was installed at the Pentecostal Church as an extra security measure.
Moved and Seconded: THAT a report on this issue be provided by staff and brought back to the next Council Meeting. Carried

Resolutions and Direction to Staff
9.1.1 – Update on Sidewalk repairs and replacements in the Town of Parry Sound, Resolution. That the Sidewalks Repairs and Replacements Report, 2015-2019 be received for information purposes. Carried

9.1.2 – Pedestrian Crossing at Waubeek Street & Avenue/Belvedere intersections. Resolution. That the report on Pedestrian Crossing at Waubeek Street & Avenue/Belvedere intersections be received for information purposes. Carried

9.2.1 – 2020 Land Ambulance Budget. Resolution. That upon the recommendation of the EMS Advisory Committee the Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves the 2020 Land Ambulance Budget in the amount of $9,995,709.00. Carried

9.2.2 – EMS Ambulance and Paramedic Response Unit Replacements for 2020 Spokesperson: Dave Thompson, Director of Development and Protective Services. Resolution. That upon the recommendation of the EMS Advisory Committee the Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves the replacement of two ambulances to be delivered in late winter 2020 and further that the supplier of record, Crestline, be awarded the contract for the supply of these two ambulances in the amount of $129,427.21 +HST each; said ambulances funded from the EMS equipment reserve fund; and
That the upon delivery of the 2020 ambulances the two being replaced be deemed surplus and donated to First Response Teams within the District of Parry Sound. Carried
Resolution. That upon the recommendation of the EMS Advisory Committee the Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves the replacement of one Paramedic Response Unit (PRU) to be supplied by Rowland Emergency Vehicle in the amount of $70,475.00 + HST; said PRU funded from the EMS equipment reserve fund. Carried.

9.2.3 – Reappointment of Councillors to Committee of Adjustment Spokesperson: Taylor Elgie, Manager of Building and Planning Services. Resolution. That Councillors Horne and Keith be reappointed to the Parry Sound Committee of Adjustment until December 31, 2020. Carried

9.2.4 – Re-Parking, Downtown Parry Sound. Direction. That Council for the Town of Parry Sound receives the Re-parking report and directs staff to bring the proposed changes forward in January 2020. Carried

9.3.1 – Information Update: Town of Parry Sound Culture, Parks & Recreation Master Plan. Resolution. That the staff update on the Town of Parry Sound Culture, Parks and Recreation Plan be received for informational purposes. Carried

9.3.2 – Modernization Program – Intake 1, Digital Strategy. Resolution. WHEREAS the Province announced the provision of the Municipal Modernization Program which is a funding program to identify efficiencies,
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that staff be authorized to indicate to the Province the Town’s Expression of Interest and subsequently submit an application for municipal modernization funding resulting in a third-party assessment of opportunities to utilize information technology to achieve efficiencies, taking into consideration needs, resource requirements, best practices and also the identification of cost saving/sharing with other municipalities through shared technology opportunities. Carried

9.4.1 – Financial Variance Report for Third Quarter 2019. Resolution. That Council hereby receives and accepts the variance report for the Third Quarter 2019 (September 30, 2019); and
Further that Council hereby approves the expenses for Council members for the period from July 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019. Carried

9.5.1 – Council Selection Sub-Committee for Director of Public Works. Resolution. That due to a conflict of interest, Councillor Horne be removed from the Council Selection Sub-Committee for the hiring of the Director of Public Works and that Councillor Burden be appointed in his place. Carried

By-laws
10.1.1 – Stewardship Ontario MHSW Amending Agreement. By-Law 2019 – 6996. Being a by-law to execute the Stewardship Ontario MHSW amending service agreement and amend Bylaw 2008-5281. Passed, Signed, and Sealed

10.1.2 – Encroachment Agreement – 4 River Street. By-Law 2019 – 6997. Being a by-law to execute an encroachment agreement between the owner of 4 River Street and the Town of Parry Sound. Passed, Signed, and Sealed

10.1.3 – Electronic Waste Agreement. By-Law 2019 – 6998. Being a by-law to amend Bylaw 2011-6029 to continue the electronic waste agreement and to reflect the change in ownership from Global Electric Electronic Processing (GEEP) to Quantum Lifecycle Partners and to execute the Notice of Assignment to confirm the Town of Parry Sound’s agreement with the change in ownership. Passed, Signed, and Sealed

10.2.1 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/14 – College Drive (M2 Developments Inc.). By-Law 2019 – 6999. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Z/19-14 – 12 College Drive (M2 Developments Inc./Gardens of Parry Sound). Carried to table

 

Council Agenda Preview – December 3, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Mr. McIntyre’s letter (4.1) is worth reading and can be found in the full agenda package available at the Town’s website. He points out some of the safety issues faced by pedestrians in the Avenue Road area. While I don’t walk there I am conscious of the issues when cycling in the area. Although the issues may be reduced with Waubeek Street open, the area remains dangerous because of the narrow winding streets with limited sight lines.

A quick review of the summarized agenda as presented below will give you a good sense of whether you should look at the full agenda.

Note: I went to the Town’s website to provide a link to the full agenda and found it hadn’t been posted as of 5:20 Friday. A number of us subscribe to receive the agenda and minutes by email, so I’ll host the agenda package at this site. The full agenda can be accessed through this link.

Correspondence

4.1 – Eric McIntyre. Request for improving and installing sidewalks; areas cited include Avenue Road, Margaret, Marion, Ethel and Victoria Streets.

4.2 – Honourable Stephen Lecce, Minister of Education. Response to Town inquiry on status update on consolidated school project.

4.3 – Tamara Wilson, Health Outreach Coordinator, Parry Sound Friendship Centre. Warming Centre to accommodate 20 clients overnight.

Deputations

5.1 – Tamara Wilson, Health Outreach Coordinator, Parry Sound Friendship Centre. Warming Centre to accommodate 20 clients overnight.

5.2 – Jim Hanna, Communications Officer, West Parry Sound Health Centre Our Changing Health Care Environment.

5.3. – Peter Searle. Park to Park Trail update and budget

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.1.1 – Update on Sidewalk repairs and replacements in the Town of Parry Sound. Resolution. That the Sidewalks Repairs and Replacements Report, 2015-2019 be received for information purposes.

9.1.2 – Pedestrian Crossing at Waubeek Street & Avenue/Belvedere intersections. Resolution. That the report on Pedestrian Crossing at Waubeek Street & Avenue/Belvedere intersections be received for information purposes.

9.2.1 – 2020 Land Ambulance Budget. Resolution. That upon the recommendation of the EMS Advisory Committee the Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves the 2020 Land Ambulance Budget in the amount of $9,995,709.00

9.2.2 – EMS Ambulance and Paramedic Response Unit Replacements for 2020. Resolution. That upon the recommendation of the EMS Advisory Committee the Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves the replacement of two ambulances to be delivered in late winter 2020 and further that the supplier of record, Crestline, be awarded the contract for the supply of these two ambulances in the amount of $129,427.21 +HST each; said ambulances funded from the EMS equipment reserve fund; and
That the upon delivery of the 2020 ambulances the two being replaced be deemed surplus and donated to First Response Teams within the District of Parry Sound.
Resolution. That upon the recommendation of the EMS Advisory Committee the Council of the Town of Parry Sound approves the replacement of one Paramedic Response Unit (PRU) to be supplied by Rowland Emergency Vehicle in the amount of $70,475.00 + HST; said PRU funded from the EMS equipment reserve fund.

9.2.3 – Reappointment of Councillors to Committee of Adjustment Spokesperson: Taylor Elgie, Manager of Building and Planning Services. Resolution. That Councillors Horne and Keith be reappointed to the Parry Sound Committee of Adjustment until December 31, 2020.

9.2.4 – Re-Parking, Downtown Parry Sound. Direction. That Council for the Town of Parry Sound receives the Re-parking report and directs staff to bring the proposed changes forward in January 2020.

9.3.1 – Information Update: Town of Parry Sound Culture, Parks & Recreation Master Plan. Resolution. That the staff update on the Town of Parry Sound Culture, Parks and Recreation Plan be received for informational purposes.

9.3.2 – Modernization Program – Intake 1, Digital Strategy. Resolution. WHEREAS the Province announced the provision of the Municipal Modernization Program which is a funding program to identify efficiencies, NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that staff be authorized to indicate to the Province the Town’s Expression of Interest and subsequently submit an application for municipal modernization funding resulting in a third-party assessment of opportunities to utilize information technology to achieve efficiencies, taking into consideration needs, resource requirements, best practices and also the identification of cost saving/sharing with other municipalities through shared technology opportunities.

9.4.1 – Financial Variance Report for Third Quarter 2019. Resolution. That Council hereby receives and accepts the variance report for the Third Quarter 2019 (September 30, 2019); and
Further that Council hereby approves the expenses for Council members for the period from July 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019.

By-laws

10.1.1 – Stewardship Ontario MHSW Amending Agreement. By-Law 2019 – 6996. Being a by-law to execute the Stewardship Ontario MHSW amending service agreement and amend Bylaw 2008-5281.

10.1.2 – Encroachment Agreement – 4 River Street. By-Law 2019 – 6997. Being a by-law to execute an encroachment agreement between the owner of 4 River Street and the Town of Parry Sound.

10.1.3 – Electronic Waste Agreement. By-Law 2019 – 6998. Being a by-law to amend Bylaw 2011-6029 to continue the electronic waste agreement and to reflect the change in ownership from Global Electric Electronic Processing (GEEP) to Quantum Lifecycle Partners and to execute the Notice of Assignment to confirm the Town of Parry Sound’s agreement with the change in ownership.

10.2.1 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/14 – College Drive (M2 Developments Inc.). By-Law 2019 – 6999. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Z/19-14 – 12 College Drive (M2 Developments Inc./Gardens of Parry Sound).

 

 

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – November 19, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , ,

The major news from this week’s Town of Parry Sound council meeting is that the Lighthouse development on Salt Dock Road has a green light from Council to proceed.

As always there were questions of Staff about snow removal when we get an early season dump. I think the Town does a good job, but there are always people who want more and faster. Well we can have it, it just costs money. That also means we will have unused capacity if and when it doesn’t snow. How much buffer do you carry in your bank accounts; how much extra life insurance and disability insurance do you carry? I’m sure that if you are conscientious you do what is necessary with a little extra capacity but realize that you really aren’t prepared if we were to get two feet of snow in one day, or you had a house fire. You could survive it, but it will take patience and understanding. I would rather not raise the taxes so that we clear the snow an hour earlier. We shouldn’t be surprised when we get a dump with the quality of weather forecasts. We need to plan for it. If your street isn’t plowed as early as you like, park overnight at a friend’s house where there is earlier service and walk over to your car in the morning. If the sidewalks aren’t clear at 8:00, wait until they are cleared. Don’t play the role of victim. If you want better snow service, let Council know and be prepared to pay for it.

The day we received the dump of snow I had a meeting in the downtown, and I drove. The roads were okay as I traveled down Bowes and Miller Streets. I thought for a minute or two about Peter Brown, Director of Operations retiring at the end of the year. I realized that he doesn’t just worry about getting to work every day, he also has to worry about getting everybody else to work and school every day, and those folks who want to get out for an early coffee. I suddenly understood why he is retiring, at least from this position. When you are a public servant everybody thinks they are your boss and being experts they can tell you how to do your job better. Enough is enough. The job is still open if you think you can do a better job. And you get the benefits and scrutiny that comes with making the Sunshine List.

Closed Session

c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purpose, (property matter);
e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (update on litigation of cases with the Town);
f) the receiving of advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose, (update on litigation of cases with the Town);
j) educating or training council members and no member shall discuss or deal with any matter in a way that materially advances the business of the Council (municipal finances);

Questions of Staff

3.2.1 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s request for an update on the progress on Waubeek Street, Director of Public Works Peter Brown replied that Waubeek & Melvin will be paved starting tomorrow morning and will be open for business Thursday morning. Some concrete work will be completed in the Spring.

3.2.2 – Councillor McCann inquired as to how staff manage & prioritize the plowing of roads and sidewalks, as he and other Councillors received complaints regarding the snowplowing during the last snowfall. Director of Public Works Peter Brown responded that the Town has a Winter Control Policy available on the website for residents to view which is mandated by Council. At that particular snow event the snow started about 1:30 am and crews were out by 4:30 am plowing & sidewalk clearing. Plowing is done on a priority and traffic flow basis per the policy and Mr. Brown reported that he feels staff are doing an excellent job. Each year the plan is modified to accommodate changes in the community such as the new placement of schools.

3.2.3 – Councillor Backman asked the Director of Development & Protective Services for an update on the strategic planning process. Dave Thompson responded that the process was started with focus group sessions yesterday morning and evening. On November 26th the group will be at the high school for input from the students and there will be an open house in the evening of the 26th at the BOCC from 7:00 to 9:00 pm that the public are welcome to attend. The consultants and senior staff will be present to answer questions. There is a web-based survey on the Town’s website which has over 180 surveys completed to date. After November 26th the consultants will consolidate the information and bring the information forward to the December 17th council meeting for Council’s review and input.

3.2.4 – Councillor Keith inquired of Mr. Brown if he was familiar with any community education programs concerning snowfall events and the need for residents themselves to also be prepared. Mr. Brown replied that he has seen some websites and twitter feeds with this information; he will ensure this information is circulated soon on the Town website and twitter feed.

Correspondence

4.1 – District of Parry Sound Violence Against Women Coordinating Committee. Request as part of national initiative, that the Municipal office flags be lowered to 1/2 mast on December 6, 2019 to mark the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women and specifically to remember the lives lost on December 6th, 1989 of 14 young university students at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal. Circulated to Mayor & Council, on this evening’s agenda as item 8.1 and filed.

4.2 – Climate Action Parry Sound. They are a grassroots organization of concerned citizens committed to limiting and mitigating the effects of human-caused global warming introducing their group to Council. Their goals are to raise awareness, solicit petition signatures to be forwarded to provincial and federal governments and support youth commitment for multi- generational demonstrations in support of “Fridays for Future”. They will network and collaborate with other groups and organizations in our community on lowering our carbon footprint. Circulated to Mayor & Council and filed.

Deputations

5.1 – Glenda Clayton and Monica Moore, Parry Sound Area Food Collaborative. Community Oven. Glenda Clayton addressed Council, introducing the Parry Sound and Area Food Collaborative as a group of key community stakeholders and a number of individual residents who work at championing healthy sustainable food systems for the Parry Sound Area. They have a number of initiatives including the Parry Sound & Area Food Charter. Ms. Clayton reported that a new initiative is a Community Oven – an age-old multi-cultural tradition, and they propose to locate it at the Mary Street Centre, built outside on the green space between their building and the North Star building, now owned by the Ryans. The oven will be available to be rented by various groups and also used for community events. Oven masters will be trained to work with the users. They have conferred with Fire Chief Thompson on some of the safety aspects. It will be heated by wood which will be stored in a locked wood storage building. Ms. Clayton and Ms. Moore concluded by requesting support for this initiative.

5.2 – Ron Jenkins. Sidewalks and repairs required for his wheelchair. Mr. Jenkins addressed Council noting that he came here 6 years ago from Guelph, and loves being here. He said that the elevator in this building won’t accommodate his wheelchair so he walked up the stairs this evening. He & other wheelchair users get together to discuss which back streets to avoid, to minimize the damage to their wheelchairs. He requests that attention be paid to the state of the sidewalks and says it would be very appreciated by him and many other wheelchair users. He requests that Council members use a wheelchair on the sidewalks to see what he means.
The following direction was proposed: That staff develop a report with respect to developing a disabled citizens committee that could make recommendations to Council as to some needs in the community. Carried

5.3 – Nancy Cunningham Re: Lighthouse OPA & ZBA. Ms. Cunningham addressed Council requesting some assurances and clarification on the guarantees put forward by the developer on such items as: only the elevator shaft & no other additions being on the roof, preservation of the trees between the subject property and the Fitness Trail, information on the surveyor and clarification on what height compared to Beaconview – floor or ceiling level, what is the record of the developer with regards to parking, garbage storage & landscaping, and why is the independent planner’s report called a justification report. Ms. Cunningham reminded Council members that most of them were in office when both the Official Plan and the Trails Master Plan were being developed and that the residents rely on those members to support the legislation they helped create. Ms. Cunningham requested a recorded vote on this matter.

5.4 – Josh Morgan, Morgan Planning & Development. Lighthouse Official Plan Amendment/Zoning By-law Amendment (OPA / ZBA). Mr. Morgan, representing Greystone Project Management, addressed Council to summarize the primary topics & concerns expressed during the public meeting in July, the primary themes expressed in correspondence since the public meeting and the steps the applicant has taken since those comments were received and the summary of the land use control measures that would be in place should the by-laws be passed.
In response to the Primary Land Use comments: Triton Engineering Services Limited was retained to peer review the Traffic Impact Study, FRI Corp was retained to peer review the Species at Risk Assessment. The Town retained Jamie Robinson of MHBC Planning to provide his professional planning opinion regarding the appropriateness of the applications.
Riverstone Environmental Solutions Inc prepared an itemized response to the environmental peer review and FRI Corp confirmed that all of their peer review comments had been suitably addressed.
Tatham Engineering Limited prepared an itemized response to the traffic peer review and they accept that there will not be any appreciable level of service or capacity issues and that the entrance alignment and/or sight line improvements can be addressed via Site Plan Approval Process.
L.U. Maughan Company Limited, an Ontario Land Surveyor, was retained to confirm the finished 1st floor elevation of the adjacent Beaconview, which is 203.75 GSC. The elevation of the proposed roof is 203.6 GSC which is lower than the 1st floor elevation of Beaconview. An earth toned roof membrane will be utilized and air conditioning units will not be installed on the roof.
The site plan has been updated to increase the westerly interior side yard setback from 3.47m to 6.0m which allows a greater setback between the building and the fitness trail. With the trail being approx. 9.0m from the westerly property boundary this results in an approx. setback of 15m. Proposed are improvements to the existing trailhead with improved public parking, installation of a trail extension and crosswalk over Salt Dock Road.
Due to the topography of the subject property the designation of Open Public Space doesn’t fit well as its use as a public facility or park would be very difficult. It is more suited to the designation of Residential High Density.
Detailed servicing, grading and storm water management design drawings will be submitted as part of the Site Plan approval process.
Soil Engineers Ltd. have been retained to prepare Phase 1 and Phase 2 Environmental Site Assessment once the ZBA and OPA have been approved to file a Record of Site Condition, if required.
The ZBA is proposed with a Holding provision. The holding provision will not be lifted until such time as the applicant has obtained Site Plan Approval and Record of Site Condition, if required.
Mr. Morgan requested approval of both the Zoning By-law Amendment and the Official Plan Amendment.

5.5 – Jamie Robinson, MHBC Planning. Mr. Robinson addressed Council, reporting that he has 17 years experience throughout central and northern Ontario as a professional planner, and he has been retained by the Town of Parry Sound to take an independent review of this site dealing with the 2 land use planning applications on the agenda this evening. Mr. Robinson said that the 2 by- laws are intended to establish the principle of use for the site; i.e. “is this an appropriate site for a building of the size, of the massing of the scale that’s proposed with the site specific amendments that are identified through the zoning by-law? That’s the question before Council with both the OPA and the ZBA”. Mr. Robinson said that the specific details would be considered through the site plan agreement that will be brought to Council at a later time.
With respect to the earlier deputation concerning guarantees to the surrounding area and residents with respect to the application, Mr. Robinson reported that Mr. Morgan identified that the site plan control process provides those guarantees and also the zoning by-law amendment that’s before Council this evening does specifically establish a building envelope of the site, and it does specifically establish a maximum height provision for this building so it effectively establishes a building location and a massing for development on this site. If the proposed development were ever to exceed those requirements, additional planning approval would be required and there would be a public meeting for that so the by-law itself is an important component to provide those assurances to the public. Mr. Robinson also noted that as Mr. Morgan mentioned, the site plan process does provide those specific details as well.
With respect to comments as to whether Mr. Robinson’s report was a “justification report”, or a “review report”, Mr. Robinson said that it is a “review report”. Mr. Robinson noted that there is a footer within his report which is incorrect, and for that he apologized and confirmed that it is a review report.
Mr. Robinson noted that the OPA relates to Schedule A of the Official Plan to be modified to re-designate the lands to High Density Residential. The lands currently are not being used as a park and in historical documents these lands are not identified for future parkland purposes.
In the ZBA there are a number of different modifications proposed: a height of 12.5 m, the height is measured from the front lot which in this case the front yard abuts Salt Dock Road. The elevations of 203.75 and 203.6 were provided by the surveyors. For assurances to the public those elevations would be encapsulated in the site plan agreement and the zoning by-law itself specified a maximum height of 12.5m. The specifics of the elevator are included in the ZBA and would require an amendment if proposed to be changed.
The by-law requires 50% front yard, the proposed reduction is to 29%; the front yard contains parking, snow storage and landscaped open space. While the front yard faces Salt Dock Road, the building itself faces Georgian Bay. Outdoor parking spaces are 3m x 6m which meets the requirement of the zoning by-law; however, each indoor parking space is proposed to be 2.7m x 6m.
A Holding “H” Symbol is added to a zoning by-law amendment and it effectively provides some conditions that need to be satisfied before a building permit can be issued. What the Holding symbol means is that site plan control is required. Specific items are included in the holding symbol and the site plan agreement which reflect the public comments and concerns. The details, “nuts & bolts”, of the site plan agreement will be ironed out by staff during the site plan process, details such as design requirements related to roof structures, restrictions on mechanicals on roof. As all this information has to be built right into the site plan agreement this gives assurance as it is a legal binding agreement between the property owner, the Town and any future property owner as it’s an agreement registered on title.
Mr. Robinson reported that in context of the surrounding developments, there are a number of high-density developments in the area, and in his opinion, he thinks the proposed development does make efficient use of existing infrastructure and is appropriate both from a scale perspective and a density perspective and is compatible with surrounding land uses.
With regard to the height, Mr. Robinson reported that he believed there have been some steps taken to protect the views for the existing condominium in the area.
Mr. Robinson reported that he believed there has been adequate consideration given to trail connection and parkland aspects.
The traffic study identifies there is existing transportation infrastructure in the area sufficient to support the additional demand that would be created.
The parking requirements do exceed the minimum requirements.
An Endangered and Threatened species assessment was completed and determined there is a very low likelihood of endangered or threatened species present. A timing window is recommended to be included in the site plan agreement.
In conclusion, Mr. Robinson reported that an independent look at each of the public comments was undertaken and addressed within his report. Having reviewed the Official Plan and having reviewed the Growth Plan for Northern Ontario and the Provincial Policy Statement, Mr. Robinson reported that he believed that the proposed development is consistent with the PPS and conforms both with the growth plan and the Town’s Official Plan and would represent good land use planning.

After the deputations Council dealt with prioritized Item 10.2.2

10.2.2 – Lighthouse Official Plan Amendment (OPA) and Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA).
By-law 2019 – 6991. Being a By-law to Adopt Official Plan Amendment No. 2 – Part of Block Q of Plan 123 and a portion of Part 7 of 42R129.
A recorded vote was taken:
Yes – Councillor Vanessa Backman, Councillor Paul Borneman, Councillor Roger Burden, Councillor Brad Horne, Councillor Bonnie Keith, Councillor Doug McCann, Mayor Jamie McGarvey
Passed, Signed & Sealed

By-law 2019 – 6992. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Part of Block Q of Plan 123 and a portion of Part 7 of 42R129. That the following amendment be included in the by-law:
Despite Section 8.2 of By-law 2004-4653, as amended, the property shall be limited to a maximum of 43 Apartment Dwelling Units. Carried
A recorded vote was taken:
Yes – Councillor Vanessa Backman, Councillor Paul Borneman, Councillor Roger Burden, Councillor Brad Horne, Councillor Bonnie Keith, Councillor Doug McCann, Mayor Jamie McGarvey
Passed, Signed & Sealed

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.3.1 – BOCC Championship Banner Display Policy. Resolution. That Council approve the Bobby Orr Community Centre Championship Banner Display Policy as attached as Schedule A. Carried

9.3.2 – West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre (Wellness Centre and Pool Complex). Direction. THAT the update report on the West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre (Wellness Centre and Pool Complex) be received for information purposes. Carried

9.3.3 – Parry Sound Wastewater Treatment Plant Inspection Report. Resolution. That the report on the September 4, 2019 Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) Parry Sound Wastewater Treatment Plant Inspection Report be received for information purposes. Carried

9.3.4 – Municipal Modernization Program, Expression of Interest. Resolution. Whereas Intake 1 for the Municipal Modernization Program was announced on November 12, 2019 by the Province; and
Whereas the program only applies to 405 small and rural Ontario municipalities, including Parry Sound; and
Whereas municipalities must submit an intention to apply by November 22, 2019; and
Whereas an Expression of Interest must be submitted by December 6, 2019;
Now Therefore staff be directed to submit the Town’s intention to apply to the Municipal Modernization Program for funding for a review of current waste management services with the objective of finding service delivery efficiencies and creating a long-term waste management strategy; and
That staff report back to Council prior to the December 6, 2019 deadline should an alternative project be determined as more appropriate. Carried

By-laws

10.1.1 – Curbside Waste & Recycling Collection Contract Extension Spokesperson: Peter Brown, Director of Public Works.
By-law 2019 – 6994. Being a bylaw to amend bylaw 2011-6048 and bylaw 2019-6890, to authorize the execution of an extension of the existing curbside waste and recycling collection contract with Waste Connections of Canada Inc. for one year, ending December 31, 2020. Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.2.1 – Municipal Office and Firehall Custodial 2020 and 202.
By-law 2019 – 6984. That Council authorizes the execution of a contract with Bernie Filiatrault’s Janitorial for Custodial services of the Municipal Office and Council Chambers set-up. Passed, Signed & Sealed
By-law 2019 – 6985. That Council authorizes the execution of a contract with Bernie Filiatrault’s Janitorial for Custodial services at the Firehall Complex. Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.3.1 – Parry Sound Area Founders Circle Agreement.
By-law 2019 – 6993. Being a by-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with the Parry Sound Area Founders Circle to support business innovation and new business’s ideas. Passed, Signed & Sealed

10.4.1 – Debenture issue for completed 2018 and 2019 Capital Works.
By-law 2019 – 6989. A By-law of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound to Authorize the Borrowing Upon Amortizing Debentures in the Principal Amount of $727,779.50 Towards the Cost of the Stockey Centre Roof/Hardy Board Siding. Passed, Signed & Sealed
By-law 2019 – 6990. A By-law of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound to Authorize the Borrowing Upon Amortizing Debentures in the Principal Amount of $860,435.56 Towards the Cost of the Bobby Orr Community Centre Ice Pad Replacement. Passed, Signed & Sealed

Council Agenda Preview – November 19, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , ,

I thought this was going to be a “nothing burger” agenda package until I took a look at the attachments. Item 9.3.2 provides an overview, with architectural drawings of what is now referred to as the “West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre”, 49,000 square feet and $32 million. The funding request submitted to upper tier government is for $23.5 million leaving the seven municipalities and two First Nation communities on the hook for $8.5 million. While I would normally suggest you go to the Town’s website to download the full agenda package I have clipped the proposal portion of the agenda package and made it available through this link.

Beyond that the agenda is a nothing burger. No, wait, there is Item 10.2.2, Lighthouse Official Plan Amendment (OPA) and Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA). This includes the report from outside consultants regarding the proposed condominium development on Salt Dock Road. Once again, I have clipped the appropriate section from the agenda and made it available through this link. (It’s 226 pages in length.)

I will not present my opinions on either of the two items, but I will note that if the West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre is in fact funded and developed it will fundamentally transform the Town of Parry Sound and the surrounding communities. On both items I plan to keep my opinions to myself. There are enough opinions out there already. I will focus on the numbers and the implications that are not so obvious.

Closed Session

c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purpose, (property matter)

e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board, (update on litigation of cases with the Town)

f) the receiving of advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose, (update on litigation of cases with the Town)

j) educating or training council members and no member shall discuss or deal with any matter in a way that materially advances the business of the Council (municipal finances)

Correspondence

4.1 – District of Parry Sound Violence Against Women Coordinating Committee. Request that the Municipal office flags be lowered to 1/2 mast on December 6, 2019 to mark the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women and specifically to remember the lives lost on December 6th, 1989 of 14 young university students at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal.

4.2 – Climate Action Parry Sound. They are a grassroots organization of concerned citizens committed to limiting and mitigating the effects of human-caused global warming introducing their group to Council.

Deputations

5.1 – Glenda Clayton and Monica Moore, Parry Sound Area Food Collaborative. Community Oven.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.3.1 – BOCC Championship Banner Display Policy. Resolution. That Council approve the Bobby Orr Community Centre Championship Banner Display Policy as attached as Schedule A.

9.3.2 – West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre (Wellness Centre and Pool Complex). Direction. That the update report on the West Parry Sound Area Recreation and Culture Centre (Wellness Centre and Pool Complex) be received for information purposes.

9.3.3 – Parry Sound Wastewater Treatment Plant Inspection Report. Resolution. That the report on the September 4, 2019 Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) Parry Sound Wastewater Treatment Plant Inspection Report be received for information purposes.

9.3.4 – Municipal Modernization Program, Expression of Interest. Report to follow.

By-laws

10.1.1 – Curbside Waste & Recycling Collection Contract Extension. By-law 2019 – 6994. Being a bylaw to amend bylaw 2011-6048 and bylaw 2019-6890, to authorize the execution of an extension of the existing curbside waste and recycling collection contract with Waste Connections of Canada Inc. for one year, ending December 31, 2020.

10.2.1 – Municipal Office and Firehall Custodial 2020 and 202. By-law 2019 – 6984. That Council authorizes the execution of a contract with Bernie Filiatrault’s Janitorial for Custodial services of the Municipal Office and Council Chambers set-up.
By-law 2019 – 6985. That Council authorizes the execution of a contract with Bernie Filiatrault’s Janitorial for Custodial services at the Firehall Complex.

10.2.2 – Lighthouse Official Plan Amendment (OPA) and Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA). Spokesperson: Jamie Robinson, MHBC Planning, Urban Design & Landscape Architecture.
By-law 2019 – 6991. Being a By-law to Adopt Official Plan Amendment No. 2 – Part of Block Q of Plan 123 and a portion of Part 7 of 42R129.
By-law 2019 – 6992. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Part of Block Q of Plan 123 and a portion of Part 7 of 42R129.

10.3.1 – Parry Sound Area Founders Circle Agreement. By-law 2019 – 6993. Being a by-law to authorize the execution of an Agreement with the Parry Sound Area Founders Circle to support business innovation and new business’s ideas.

10.4.1 – Debenture issue for completed 2018 and 2019 Capital Works.
By-law 2019 – 6989. A By-law of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound to Authorize the Borrowing Upon Amortizing Debentures in the Principal Amount of $727,779.50 Towards the Cost of the Stockey Centre Roof/Hardy Board Siding.
By-law 2019 – 6990. A By-law of the Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound to Authorize the Borrowing Upon Amortizing Debentures in the Principal Amount of $860,435.56 Towards the Cost of the Bobby Orr Community Centre Ice Pad Replacement

 

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – November 5, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

Council approved a couple of items related to the Wellness/Pool complex that moves the process forward. Beyond that there was nothing discussed or agreed that caught my interest.

Closed Session

  1. c) a proposed or pending acquisition or disposition of land for municipal or local board purpose, (property matter)
  2. e) litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board (French Public School Board; Tax-Exempt properties);
  3. f) the receiving of advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose (French Public School Board)

1.4 Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof1.4.1 – Councillor Horne declared Pecuniary Interest on item 10.2.1 regarding the Fire Dispatch Service Agreement with the West Parry Sound Health Centre (WPSHC) as his spouse is the Chief Operating Officer of the WPSHC. Councillor Horne left the room, did not participate in discussion nor vote on the item.

Questions of Staff

3.2.1 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry regarding the presence of lead in drinking water, Director of Public Works Peter Brown responded that Town of Parry Sound staff are mandated and do sampling for lead all through Parry Sound, and have received relief from doing a number of samples because all lead samples have come back extremely low. Mr. Brown noted that the majority of lead samples in municipalities that do exist, including within Parry Sound, are in people’s plumbing not in the municipal pipe system.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s inquiry with respect to the projected completion date of the Waubeek Street project, Mr. Brown noted that the bad weather is having a negative impact, however the contractors are working hard to compete it and the watermain work at the top of Waubeek Street near the intersection with Belvedere should start on Thursday and Melvin Street should be done by tomorrow. Mr. Brown reported that he hopes that at least one lift of asphalt will be laid before winter.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry as to whether the watermain work at Belvedere might necessitate blocking off traffic for which notice should be given, Mr. Brown reported that he did not anticipate full closure of the street, and that vehicles would have access through at least one lane.

Correspondence
4.1 –
Dan Madigan, Elizabeth Court. Request for “no parking anytime” signs related to cars parked on Elizabeth Court. Referred to By-law Enforcement Officer and Public Works Director with signs erected and by-law enforcement monitoring being carried out.

4.3 – Gurneth Hoddy, President Parry Sound Seniors Club 1269. Request for $5,000 funding for 2020. Circulated to Mayor & Council and to the Director of Finance for budget 2020 consideration with an acknowledgment letter sent.

4.4 – Don Cowan, William Street. Request for 4-way stop at James-William Street. Circulated to Mayor & Council and Director of Public Works. Based on a previous similar request, the Director of Public Works has included for consideration in the 2020 budget an amount for a complete engineering review of the intersection.

4.5 – Stephanie Allman, Enbridge Gas. Notice of Hearing for 2020 Rate increase application. Circulated to Mayor & Council and filed.

4.6 – Guy Bourgouin, MPP Mushkegowuk – James Bay. Requesting support for Bill 125 re: Making Northern Ontario Highways Safer Act. Circulated to Mayor & Council and filed.

4.7 – LCBO Convenience Outlets Program. Accepting proposals up to November 20th from retailers to be a LCBO Convenience location. Circulated to Mayor & Council and filed.

Deputations
5.1 –
Joanna Han, Co-chair of the Parry Sound Drug Strategy and Community Health Promoter for the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit. Regarding Community Sharps Bins
Ms. Han addressed Council from a prepared power point presentation on the value of Community Sharps Bins to help keep communities safe. Ms. Han advocated a non- judgemental, non-coercive and client centred “harm reduction” philosophy to substance use, that on the basis of evidence, reduces the impact on individual user and society. Ms. Han said that a harm reduction approach does not encourage or increase substance use; harm reduction programs help reduce infectious diseases, overdoses and deaths, injection substance use in public places, number of used needles in public, sharing of needles and other substance use equipment, and crime; and that harm reduction programs help increase employment among people who use substances, outreach and education and referrals to programs and services.
Ms. Han cited needle exchange stats for Parry Sound branch of the Health Unit with 80,194 needles out, 61,283 needles returned, resulting in almost 19,000 missing, giving rise to a safety risk to people. The presence of an easily accessible 24/7 Community Sharps Bin where needles can be dropped off, improves community safety, protects children, reduces health care costs and reduces the stigma.
With respect to the location, feedback has been collected by people locally who use needles, with 3 top locations in town selected. The next step is to have a focus group composed of members with lived substance-use experience select the recommended location(s). With Town inspection and approval, the site is prepared and bin installed. Accompanying installation of the bin, will be a community sharps education and communication plan.
Ms. Han provided a summary of tasks and associated costs breakdown for the Health Unit/CMHA and Town partners, with ongoing maintenance costs from $0 to $2,500 annually; and sharps disposal costs of $1,500 to $7,700 annually dependent upon who takes responsibility.
The following motion was made:
That Town staff be directed to work together with the Health Unit to bring a Community Sharps Bin program forward to 2020 budget and establish guidelines. Carried
In response to Councillor inquiries, Ms. Han reported that the usual location for a Community Sharps Bin is in a discreet but central location. With respect to the number of needles that have been issued but not returned, Ms. Han responded that the Health Unit is not sure where they all are, and that one possibility is that some are being held and accumulated to be returned all at once.

5.2 – Daniel Collings. Regarding Second Harvest/Food Rescue
Daniel Collings addressed Council from a prepared power point presentation on Food Rescue, with more information on the program at http://www.foodrescue.ca. Mr. Collings provided some statistics on surplus food, noting that 35.5 million metric tonnes of food is wasted in Canada annually which costs $100 billion with respect to associated water, electricity, labour and transportation to deal with it. Food in landfill creates methane gas, a leading cause of climate change.
Mr. Collings reported that a study conducted by Secord Harvest and Value Chain Management International found that 58% of all food produced is lost or wasted and of that 32% could have been rescued to support communities across Canada. Put another way, Mr. Collings noted that the annual avoidable food loss is enough to feed every Canadian for 5 months.
With respect to food insecurity, Mr. Collings noted that 13% of Canadians; i.e. 4 million, with 1.15 being children have inadequate access to healthy, affordable food, with income as the cause of food insecurity.
Mr. Collings provided more detail on Second Harvest which operates the Food Rescue program, noting that it is Canada’s largest food rescue organization, in operation for over 30 years, and has developed FoodResue.ca as a solution to expand their model, using a website to directly connect food business to non-profit organizations, resulting in greater capacity for food rescue and distribution.
Mr. Collings provided information on registering on-line to donate or rescue food, and information on the tracking features of the program, including amount and value of food donated and rescued, and greenhouse gases averted. Mr. Collings provided an example of the on-line process from start to finish of registering to donate food, with specification provided on the category and care of the food, approximate weight, location of donor site, and preferred pick-up time, through to the information received by the potential food rescuer (eligibility criteria being any charity or not-for-profit organization) and commitment to pick-up, thereby taking it out of the marketplace.
Mr. Collings noted that the Food Rescue program is a partner of the Climate Protection Program of which the Town is a member, and that greenhouse gases reduced as a result of food averted from landfill could be used for the targets and strategies for reduction in 2020.
Mr. Collings noted that statistically, 1 in 8 families in Canada struggle to put food on the table, but that in Parry Sound-Nipissing, it is 1 in 7. Since the program was piloted in May of 2018, over 1000 food businesses and 850 social service agencies are using the program with over 600,000 pounds of food rescued with specific champions in Parry Sound including Harry’s No Frills, Trestle Brewing Company, Boston Pizza and on the agency side including the Salvation Army, Mary Street Centre, and Harvest Share.
In response to Councillor queries, Mr. Colling noted that perishable food donated which is 14 days before the best before date and shelf stable food which is 3 months prior to the best before date are eligible for tax receipts. With respect to liability, Mr. Collings noted that the Donation of Food Act, 1994 prevents a person donating food in good faith from being held liable for injuries as a result of the consumption of the food. In addition, the social services agencies receiving and distributing the food are vetted by Second Harvest to ensure they have safe food handling practices in place.

5.3 – Ted Knight, St. James United Church. Regarding Support for Consent Application B 25/2019 (PS) (St. James Centennial United Church) and request for relief from Cash-in-lieu of parkland dedication.
Mr. Knight addressed Council on behalf of St. James United Church/Mary Street Centre, requesting relief from the required payment in lieu of parkland dedication of one new lot. Mr. Knight noted that the Church wants to sever the property that includes a law office at 22 Miller Street, so that the Church can move forward with its programs to help the community. Mr. Knight said that St. James United Church is not a developer that builds houses or units, but rather is a developer of services required by so many in the community, and that by severing and selling the former manse at 22 Miller Street, the church can further respond to needs of the community through various outreach programs. In conclusion, Mr. Knight requested exemption from the cash-in-lieu of parkland requirement in the consent application.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.2.1 – Consent Application – B 25/2019 (PS) (St. James Centennial United Church) Spokesperson: Taylor Elgie, Manager of Building and Planning Services. Resolution.
That a decision on Consent Application No. B 25/2019 (PS) (St. James Centennial United Church) be approved subject to:
1. Payment for cash-in-lieu of parkland dedication for one new lot.
2. That the applicant be advised that each of the severed and retained lots require separate and individual water and sewer services, or, if necessary, an easement be conveyed for any services which traverse either the severed or retained lot in favour of the other lot.
3. That the severed lot ensure that parking requirements are satisfied (either by parking on-site, obtaining permission from the Town or including a right-of-way on the retained parcel).
The following amendment was made:
That the resolution be amended so that numbered clause 1 reads: “Payment of $1 for cash-in-lieu of parkland dedication for one new lot.” Amendment Carried. The amended resolution was voted on: Carried as amended.

9.2.2 – Ambulance In-Vehicle Computers. Resolution. That the Council for the Town of Parry Sound approve the budgeted purchase of ambulance in-vehicle computers in the amount of $87,550.00 plus HST from Interdev. Carried.

9.2.3 – Municipal Office and Firehall Custodial 2020 and 2021 John Este, Chief Building Official. Resolution. That Council elects to accept neither of the proposals received regarding the work of Schedule C in the RFP – Custodial 2020 and 2021. (Town Office sidewalk entrance maintenance – snow shovelling, sanding, etc.). Carried.

9.3.1 – Amendment to Wellness Centre & Pool Committee Terms of Reference. Resolution. Whereas it is desirable that clarity be provided in the Wellness Centre Pool Committee’s Terms of Reference regarding which municipal procedural by-law governs the Committee’s procedures; and
Whereas the Town of Parry Sound provides secretariat services and hosts the Wellness Centre Pool Committee meetings,
Now therefore the Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby authorizes the following amendment to the Wellness Centre Pool Committee’s Terms of Reference as previously adopted by Resolution 2019 – 087:
That the sentence: “Roberts Rules shall apply to matters not covered by these Terms of Reference.”, be replaced with: “The Town of Parry Sound’s procedural by-law shall apply to matters not covered by these Terms of Reference, with Robert’s Rules of Order applying in any case where provision is not made by the Town of Parry Sound’s procedural by-law”; and
That the Wellness Centre Pool Committee’s Terms of Reference shall be so amended upon the unanimous consent of the respective participating Councils. Carried.

9.3.2 – Integrity Commissioner Report – 2018. Resolution. Whereas Section 14 of the Council, Boards and Committees Code of Conduct By-law 2018-6875 requires that the Integrity Commissioner provide an annual report on previous year activities to Council;
Now Therefore Council accepts the Integrity Commissioner’s response through the Clerk, that no complaints were received, and no investigations conducted in 2018. Carried.

9.3.3 – Wellness Centre & Pool Complex – ICIP Grant Application. Resolution. THAT the Council for the Town of Parry Sound supports the Town of Parry Sound as the lead for submitting a joint application to the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP), Community, Culture and Recreation Funding Stream for a “West Parry Sound Area Recreation Complex” on behalf of the seven (7) West Parry Sound area Municipalities and the First Nations Communities of Wasauksing and Shawanaga; and
THAT the proposed commitment and share of the estimated capital and operating costs of the project for each Municipality and First Nation Community be determined upon the completion of the report by CS&P Architects, with input from the Citizens Advisory Committee and the development of a facility governance model by the CAO Steering Committee; and
THAT the Mayor & Clerk be authorized to sign the relevant documents related to the ICIP application and cost sharing agreement. Carried.

By-laws

10.2.1 – Fire Dispatch Contract. By-law 2019 – 6980. Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with the West Parry Sound Health Centre for the provision of Fire Dispatch services. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.2.2 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/15 – 32 Great North Road (Distler for Ambraska). By-Law 2019 – 6981. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 32 Great North Road (Distler for Ambraska). Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.2.3 – Appointment and Agreement with Philip West for on-call after-hours Municipal Law Enforcement services. By-law 2019 – 6986. Being a By-law to authorize an agreement for municipal by-law enforcement on-call service and appoint Philip West as a Municipal By-law Enforcement Officer. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.3.1 – Olympia Ice Resurfacer Advertising: Canadian Tire Parry Sound. By-Law 2019-6979. That Council authorize the execution of an agreement with Canadian Tire Parry Sound, for advertising on the entire Olympia Ice Resurfacer Unit for a term of three (3) years. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.3.2 – CS&P Consulting Services Contract – Wellness Centre & Pool Complex. By-law 2019 – 6987. Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with CS&P Architects for Consulting Services for the Wellness Centre & Pool Complex. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.4.1 – POA Defaulted Fines Collection Fees. By-law 2019 – 6982. Being a bylaw to amend by-law 2010-5408 The Fees and Services Charges by-law to add a Schedule “I” named POA Service Fees. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.4.2 – 2019 Debenture. By-law 2019 – 6983. Being a by-law to authorize certain new capital works of The Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound (the “Municipality”); to authorize the submission of an application to Ontario Infrastructure and Lands Corporation (“OILC”) for financing such capital works; to authorize temporary borrowing from OILC to meet expenditures in connection with such works; and to authorize long term borrowing for such works through the issue of debentures to OILC. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

Council Agenda Preview – November 9, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , ,

There is nothing particularly notable or controversial; just taking care of business. Certainly Enbridge Gas, Item 4.5, is taking care of business.

Closed Session

e) – litigation or potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board (French Public School Board; Tax-Exempt properties);

Correspondence

4.1 – Dan Madigan, Elizabeth Court. Cars parked on Elizabeth Court.

4.2 – Nathan Cato, Director, Government Affairs, Canadian Pacific. CP Holiday Train – November 29th, 2019.

4.3 – Gurneth Hoddy, President Parry Sound Seniors Club 1269. Request for $5,000 funding for 2020.

4.4 – Don Cowan, William Street. Request for 4-way stop at James-William Street.

4.5 – Stephanie Allman, Enbridge Gas. Notice of Hearing for 2020 Rate increase application.

4.6 – Guy Bourgouin, MPP Mushkegowuk – James Bay. Requesting support for Bill 125 re: Making Northern Ontario Highways Safer Act

Deputations

5.1 – Joanna Han, Co-chair of the Parry Sound Drug Strategy and Community Health, Promoter for the North Bay Parry Sound District Health Unit. Community Sharps Bins.

5.2 – Christine Bome, Daniel Collings. Second Harvest/Food Rescue.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.2.1 – Consent Application – B 25/2019 (PS) (St. James Centennial United Church). Resolution.That a decision on Consent Application No. B 25/2019 (PS) (St. James Centennial United Church) be approved subject to:
1. Payment for cash-in-lieu of parkland dedication for one new lot.
2. That the.applicant be advised that each of the severed and retained lots require separate and individual water and sewer services, or, if necessary, an easement be conveyed for any services which traverse either the severed or retained lot in favour of the other lot.
3. That the severed lot ensure that parking requirements are satisfied (either by parking on-site, obtaining permission from the Town or including a right-of-way on the retained parcel).

9.2.2 – Ambulance In-Vehicle Computers. Resolution. That the Council for the Town of Parry Sound approve the budgeted purchase of ambulance in-vehicle computers in the amount of $87,550.00 plus HST from Interdev.

9.2.3 – Municipal Office and Firehall Custodial 2020 and 2021. Resolution. That Council elects to accept neither of the proposals received regarding the work of Schedule C in the RFP – Custodial 2020 and 2021.

9.3.1 – Amendment to Wellness Centre & Pool Committee Terms of Reference. Resolution. Whereas it is desirable that clarity be provided in the Wellness Centre Pool Committee’s Terms of Reference regarding which municipal procedural by-law governs the Committee’s procedures; and
Whereas the Town of Parry Sound provides secretariat services and hosts the Wellness Centre Pool Committee meetings,
Now therefore the Council of the Town of Parry Sound hereby authorizes the following amendment to the Wellness Centre Pool Committee’s Terms of Reference as previously adopted by Resolution 2019 – 087:
That the sentence: “Roberts Rules shall apply to matters not covered by these Terms of Reference.”, be replaced with: “The Town of Parry Sound’s procedural by-law shall apply to matters not covered by these Terms of Reference, with Robert’s Rules of Order applying in any case where provision is not made by the Town of Parry Sound’s procedural by-law”; and
That the Wellness Centre Pool Committee’s Terms of Reference shall be so amended upon the unanimous consent of the respective participating Councils.

9.3.2 – Integrity Commissioner Report – 2018. Resolution. Whereas Section 14 of the Council, Boards and Committees Code of Conduct By-law 2018-6875 requires that the Integrity Commissioner provide an annual report on previous year activities to Council;
Now Therefore Council accepts the Integrity Commissioner’s response through the Clerk, that no complaints were received, and no investigations conducted in 2018.

9.3.3 – Wellness Centre & Pool Complex – ICIP Grant Application. Resolution. THAT the Council for the Town of Parry Sound supports the Town of Parry Sound as the lead for submitting a joint application to the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP), Community, Culture and Recreation Funding Stream for a “West Parry Sound Area Recreation Complex” on behalf of the seven (7) West Parry Sound area Municipalities and the First Nations Communities of Wasauksing and Shawanaga; and
THAT the proposed commitment and share of the estimated capital and operating costs of the project for each Municipality and First Nation Community be determined upon the completion of the report by CS&P Architects, with input from the Citizens Advisory Committee and the development of a facility governance model by the CAO Steering Committee.

By-laws

10.2.1 – Fire Dispatch Contract. By-law 2019 – 6980. Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with the West Parry Sound Health Centre for the provision of Fire Dispatch services

10.2.2 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/15 – 32 Great North Road (Distler for Ambraska). By-Law 2019 – 6981. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 32 Great North Road (Distler for Ambraska).

10.2.3 – Appointment and Agreement with Philip West for on-call after-hours Municipal Law Enforcement services. By-law 2019 – 6986. Being a By-law to authorize an agreement for municipal by-law enforcement on-call service and appoint Philip West as a Municipal By-law Enforcement Officer.

10.3.1 – Olympia Ice Resurfacer Advertising: Canadian Tire Parry Sound. By-Law 2019-6979. That Council authorize the execution of an agreement with Canadian Tire Parry Sound, for advertising on the entire Olympia Ice Resurfacer Unit for a term of three (3) years.

10.3.2 – CS&P Consulting Services Contract – Wellness Centre & Pool Complex. By-law 2019 – 6987. Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with CS&P Architects for Consulting Services for the Wellness Centre & Pool Complex.

10.4.1 – POA Defaulted Fines Collection Fees. By-law 2019 – 6982. Being a bylaw to amend by-law 2010-5408 The Fees and Services Charges by-law to add a Schedule “I” named POA Service Fees.

10.4.2 – 2019 Debenture. By-law 2019 – 6983. Being a by-law to authorize certain new capital works of The Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound (the “Municipality”); to authorize the submission of an application to Ontario Infrastructure and Lands Corporation (“OILC”) for financing such capital works; to authorize temporary borrowing from OILC to meet expenditures in connection with such works; and to authorize long term borrowing for such works through the issue of debentures to OILC.

 

 

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – October 15, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

Well, I was little disappointed reading the minutes of Tuesday’s meeting. One of the items was, depending on the decision of Council, prime for comment and criticism. The item in question, 9.4.1, concerned a reduction in the number of regular annual council meetings. In the end Council, as I expected, unanimously rejected the proposal and returned to the usual schedule of meetings. Earlier in the day I had a chance to speak to a senior staff member and offered my opinion that approving the reduced meeting schedule might not impair the operations of the Town, but it would compromise the ability of the public to make deputations before Council. The optics also would not be good if Council decided to reduce their public face time without public input.
It already is tough to secure a deputation spot for anything that might have come up on the council meeting agenda the previous Friday and would benefit from public input. Many deputations are being used by folks to provide updates, make requests, and even pitch business opportunities. Many of these are better handled perhaps with written documentation. But a letter or email doesn’t get the same attention as a deputation. Perhaps it doesn’t really need the attention. A suggestion – let’s revise the deputation protocol to allow for up to 5 or 6 deputations, but each of them no longer than 5 minutes. If a presenter can’t make their point in 5 minutes they are possibly grandstanding rather than communicating a point. If more time is required they can follow up with Staff. At the least, formally allocate 30 minutes for deputations and consistently cut folks off at the 8 minute point to allow for questions. That may free up time for unscheduled deputations that are relevant to items before Council that evening.

The idea of fewer council meetings may have merit as long as procedural changes are made to ensure the public isn’t restricted in their access to Council through the deputation process. Seems like a ballot initiative that the public should decide. I would also suggest that a raise for Council, at least cost of living, should be on the next ballot. Council is a little too shy to give themselves what is a reasonable raise. If they don’t give themselves a raise they don’t get a raise, even if they deserve it. (It’s a more ‘taxing’ job than most people realize in terms of time and criticism.)

I am listing by-law items as Carried rather than Passed, Signed and Sealed. The minutes have changed in how decisions are reported and I assume that the items have been approved even if not listed as Passed, Signed and Sealed.

Nothing else warrants comment in my opinion.

Closed Session

b) personal matter about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees (Taxi License Appeal Hearing)
e) litigation of potential litigation, including matters before administrative tribunals, affecting the municipality or local board; (Rezoning – 1 College Dr.)
f) the receiving of advice that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, including communications necessary for that purpose; (Rezoning – 1 College Dr.)

Disclosure of Pecuniary Interest and the General Nature Thereof

1.4.1 – Councillor Keith is employed by the Solicitor General and as such declared conflict on item 7.1 related to Applicant #001-2019’s appeal for a Taxi Drivers’ License. Councillor Keith left the room, did not participate in discussion nor vote on the matter.

Public Meeting

2.1 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/14 – 12 College Drive (M2 Developments Inc. – The Gardens). Subsequent to an explanation of how the public was notified of application Z/19/14 – 12 College Drive (M2 Developments Inc. – The Gardens), Manager of Building & Planning Services Taylor Elgie gave an explanation of the purpose of the proposed Zoning Bylaw Amendment (ZBA), being to amend the existing S.P. 26.88 Zone. The property currently permits a four storey Retirement Residence in addition to all the uses in the C3 zone. The applicant has requested the additional use of a four storey Apartment Dwelling to provide flexibility subject to reduced easterly and rear yard setbacks, and a reduced parking standard of 30 parking spaces for 60 units. The portion of the property subject to the rezoning is currently vacant.
Mayor McGarvey invited those in favour of the proposed ZBA to address Council.
Bill Mardimae of M2 Developments, owner and operator of the Parry Sound retirement home The Gardens addressed Council, noting that the original project was developed in 2013 with 70 suites, and an additional 37 has just been added. Mr. Mardimae reported that with increasing demand, the developer proposes to put a 40 to 50-unit apartment building for seniors adjacent to the retirement home, on the west side. Mr. Mardimae noted that the land was severed earlier this year which allows for a retirement home and some commercial uses. As the developers believe the proposed seniors’ apartment units fall somewhere in between the existing zoning permissible uses, thus the rezoning application has been made to clearly define it.
Mayor McGarvey invited those in opposition to the proposed ZBA to address Council.
Keith Smith addressed Council noting that he is not opposed to the development per se but questioned how many dedicated handicapped parking spots there would be if there are only 30 parking spaces for 50 or 60 units. Mr. Smith noted that government regulation calls for .04 dedicated handicapped parking spaces per unit, which only totals approximately 1.2 for the proposed development. Mr. Smith reported that he is a resident of The Gardens, and that there are 18 parking spots assigned for residents, 7 spots not assigned at all, and only 3 spots dedicated handicapped. Mr. Smith noted that there are two residents in wheelchairs and 16-17 people with handicapped permits and he suggested that therefore there should be 17 dedicated handicapped spots. Mr. Smith said that if the new building is going to have 30 parking spots, there should be dedicated handicapped parking over and above governmental regulations, i.e. with 50% of the spots marked for residents, and 30% of that 50% as dedicated handicapped parking.
Mr. Elgie reported that one letter has been received from Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP on behalf of Canadore College, expressing concerns with the definition of a retirement residence vs. apartment dwelling with the latter permitting any person to live there. The proposed reduced parking provisions may result in parking on Canadore property. Fasken Martineau DuMoulin requested that this technicality be addressed, or that the application its current form be denied.

2.2 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/15 – 32 Great North Road (Distler/Ambraska) Subsequent to an explanation of how the public was notified of application Z/19/15 – 32 Great North Road (Distler/Ambraska), Manager of Building & Planning Services Taylor Elgie gave an explanation of the purpose of the proposed rezoning from S.P. 26.109 to a R3 Zone. The property was zoned R3 prior to a recent rezoning, and the applicant wishes to return to R3 zoning status. Additionally, the applicant has requested a reduced parking space size of 2.7m x 6m. Previously the property was used as a fourplex, but this structure suffered a fire.
No members of the public were present to speak either in favour or in opposition to the proposed rezoning, and Mr. Elgie reported that no letters had been received.

2.3 – Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/16 – Dennis Drive and Macklaim Drive (Town of Parry Sound). Subsequent to an explanation of how the public was notified of application Z/19/16 –Dennis Drive and Macklaim Drive (Town of Parry Sound), Manager of Building & Planning Services Taylor Elgie explained that the Town proposes to rezone the subject properties from R1(h) to a R2 zone due to the recent installation of water, sewer and storm services. The properties were zoned with a holding provision to preclude development until municipal services were made available, which has occurred. The 20 properties are currently vacant.
Mayor McGarvey invited those in favour of the proposed ZBA to address Council.
Suzanne Young, resident on Macklaim Drive spoke in favour of the proposed rezoning noting that affordable housing is needed, and that with the location’s proximity to a local elementary school, it ought to attract young families. With the requirement for water, sewer and storm sewer availability, Ms. Young asked that sidewalks be included in any future development plans, and specifically that a sidewalk be installed on Macklaim Drive for pedestrians, including children walking to school, as the current design with the presence of the hill makes it dangerous for pedestrians.
No one spoke in opposition to the proposed ZBA and Mr. Elgie reported that no letters had been received either in favour or, or in opposition.
Mayor McGarvey concluded the public meeting with notice that objections to the passing of the amendments will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal.

Questions of Staff

3.2.1 – In response to Councillor Borneman’s question regarding the status of the Wellness Centre Pool Complex, CAO Clayton Harris reported that a lot of progress has been made by the area municipalities working together collectively and agreeing earlier this year on three important issues: i.e. 1) a simplified decision making process for the 7 area municipalities and 2 First Nations; 2) undertaking due diligence before committing money towards a project that could cost as much as $25 million before grants; and 3) engaging a third party with expertise to undertake the due diligence. Mr. Harris reported that the due diligence is underway, and that while there has been much said on the issue of site selection, only about 1/3 of the consultant’s work is related to site selection, with the majority of work related to understanding what the community’s needs are, capital costs based on those needs and the location, servicing costs and a business plan to address operating costs once it is built.
Mr. Harris noted that the due diligence work was awarded to a qualified firm at the October 3rd, 2019 Council meeting, after all area municipalities had agreed on cost sharing for due diligence. Mr. Harris also noted that there is a federal-provincial grant available with a November 12 submission deadline, which could fund up to 70% of the project, and that efforts are focussed on getting that grant application in by November 12th.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor Backman’s inquiry as to whether there was any plan for lighting the Town of Parry Sound sign on Highway 400 in the 2020 budget, Director of Public Works Peter Brown reported that the lighting is solar powered, has been there for as long as the sign has been there, and that he will be putting in to the 2020 budget funds to improve the intensity of the lighting there.

3.2.3 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry as to who looks after the now deteriorated Parry Sound population sign on Oastler Park Drive, Mr. Brown reported that it is the provincial Ministry of Transportation responsibility, and that he will have a conversation with MTO to learn what their time frame is for repairing/replacing it.

Correspondence

4.1 – Bill Liggins. Request for Accessible Pedestrian Signal at Church-Isabella intersection. Circulated to Mayor & Council and Director of Public Works.

4.2 – Tom Dowswell. Suggestion that DSSAB budget go towards small business. Circulated to Mayor & Council.

4.3 – Belvedere Heights Home for the Aged. RE: Notice of Annual General Meeting – October 17th, 6:30 PM, Belvedere Heights. Circulated to Mayor & Council.

4.4 – Roger & Olga Little. Request for Waubeek Street speed reduction to 40 km/hour and stop sign at Wood St. Circulated to Mayor & Council and Director of Public Works.

Deputations

5.1 Bill Liggins. Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS). Mr. Liggins, resident on Winnifred Ave, addressed Council with a request for consideration in the 2020 budget for an audible pedestrian (APS) signal at the Isabella-Church intersection. Mr. Liggins contrasted the Isabella-Church intersection which has no APS, with that at James and Seguin, noting that the latter uses a beep, which directs the pedestrian to the button, which has a directional arrow. About halfway across, the APS on other side beeps, helping the person navigate across correctly.
Mr. Liggins noted that with the mega school proposed near the Isabella-Church intersection, there will be even more pedestrian traffic including elementary school aged children, a few who have vision loss and will need safe crossing. Mr. Liggins reported that there are approximately 80-84 people in Parry Sound who have identified themselves as blind or visually impaired with that number increasing in summer months, and that he is personally aware of 4 persons in the immediate area. Mr. Liggins noted that he would like to see the Town budget annually to have traffic lights throughout the Town include APS by year 2025 in order to meet AODA guidelines.
Moved – That Staff be directed to include for consideration in the 2020 budget, APS at the Isabella-Church intersection. Carried

5.2 – Roger Little. Waubeek Street maximum speed limit. Mr. Little addressed Council regarding safety concerns on Waubeek Street where he is resident. Mr. Little noted that prior to the reconstruction work on Waubeek Street, its condition had a speed calming effect, however now he and others believe that people drive too fast on it, exceeding by 10 or 20 km/hour the unposted default speed limit of 50 km/hour.
Mr. Little reported that he did not believe Waubeek Street could be similarly compared with Parry Sound Drive, Bowes, William and Church Streets, and identified features of Waubeek Street, such as its steep hill and curve which in other jurisdictions would warrant consideration of such a street for speed reduction. Mr. Little noted that Waubeek Street is susceptible to deer crossing from Georgian Bay, and that a 40 km/hour speed limit would reduce the risk of collision or injury from collision. Mr. Little also noted that Prospect Street is 40 km/hour to address safety concerns for pedestrians who walk to the beach in summer and questioned why this shouldn’t then also apply to Waubeek Street, which is the street access to Prospect Street.
Mr. Little concluded by noting that Waubeek Street is a busy road and advocating for the posting of the speed limit at 40 km/hour and putting a stop sign at Waubeek at Wood Street out of safety concerns for pedestrians.

Ratification of Matters from Closed Agenda

7.1 – Appeal the Denial of Taxi Driver’s Licence. Councillor Keith left room and did not participate in discussion. Resolution. That Council approve Applicant #001-2019’s appeal and grant a temporary Taxi Driver’s Licence; and directs the Issuer of Licences to issue the Applicant a six (6) month Probationary Taxi Driver’s Licence with conditions identified as confidential Schedule A. Carried.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.3.1 – Director of Public Works Selection – Sub-Committee of Council Appointments. Direction. That pursuant to the Town hiring policy, the Sub-Committee for the hiring of the Director of Public Works position be composed of the following Members of Council: Councillor Borneman, Councillor Horne, Councillor Keith. Carried.

9.3.2 – Parry Sound Founders Circle. Direction. That staff be directed to bring back a partnership agreement between the Founders Circle and the Town regarding the collection and administration of the funds, including issuing charitable receipts for the donations to the Parry Sound Founders Circle award; That the agreement specify that the funds must be donated to the Town, are held in a Town bank account, and the Town has sole discretion on disbursements; and That the Town create a specific Reserve for the funds; and That the payment of the award be made based upon the recommendation by the Parry Sound Founders Circle to the Town. Carried.

9.3.3 – 2020 Council Meeting Dates. Resolution. That pursuant to By-law 2018-6814, Section 3, paragraph 4, Council approves Schedule “A” as attached, the 2020 schedule of Regular Meetings of Council. Councillor Keith requested a recorded vote. (JB Note – all voted No). Defeated.
The following motion was made: Resolution. That pursuant to By-law 2018-6814, Section 3, paragraph 4, Council approves Schedule “A” as attached, the 2020 schedule of Regular Meetings of Council, based on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of the month with the usual exceptions of January and August. Carried.

9.3.4 – Strategic Plan Resources. Direction. That staff be authorized to single source the resources necessary to undertake the updating of the Town’s Strategic Plan in the amount of $17,000. Carried.

9.4.1 – 2020 Budgeting Schedule. Resolution. That Council hereby approves the 2020 Budgeting Schedule as set out in the attached Schedule “A”. Carried.

9.5.1 Skatepark. Resolution. Whereas Council through the 2019 Budget, approved the development of a comprehensive Parks & Recreation Master Plan, and Whereas the 2019 budget also allocated $30,000 towards skatepark resurfacing and expansion; and Whereas it may be advantageous to await the results of the Parks & Recreation Master Plan with respect to a skatepark Now therefore be it resolved that Council put the Skatepark resurfacing and expansion project on hold. Carried.

By-laws

10.1.1 – Encroachment Agreement – 5 Gibson Street. By-law 2019 – 6978. Being a by-law to execute an encroachment agreement with the owner of 5 Gibson Street. Carried.

10.2.1 – Official Plan Amendment No. 3 and Rezoning Application Z/19/06 – Smith Crescent (YMCA/Wickman). By-Law 2019 – 6974. Being a By-law to Adopt Official Plan Amendment No. 3 – Smith Crescent (YMCA/Wickman). Carried.
By-Law 2019 – 6975. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Rezoning Application Z/19/06 – Smith Crescent (YMCA/Wickman). Carried.
Resolution 2019 – 117. That the Mayor and Clerk be authorized to execute a consent agreement as per Parry Sound Area Planning Board Resolution 2019-061 for application B/04/2019 (PS). Carried

10.2.2 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/13 – 17 Miller Street (Walsh/Ben Prichard Law Corporation). By-Law: 2019 – 6976. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 17 Miller Street (Walsh/Ben Prichard Law Corporation). Carried.

10.3.1 – Procedural By-law Update – Permit WCPC electronic participants voting rights. Resolution . Whereas the Wellness Centre Pool Committee established by the seven area municipalities is desirous of enabling electronic participants to vote at its open meetings; and Whereas the Town`s Procedural By-law 2018-6814 does not permit electronic participant voting at Council, nor at its boards and committees; and, Whereas proposed By-law 2019-6977 updates the Procedural By-law with minor amendments: i.e. permitting Council by resolution to authorize as it sees fit electronic participants of committees to vote; and making minor housekeeping amendments;
Now Therefore Council waives the 21-day public notice provision of amendments to the Procedural By-law as normally required by Provision of Notice Policy as contained in Resolution 2011- 242. Carried.
By-law 2019 – 6977. Being a By-law to govern and regulate the proceedings of Council of The Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound, its Committees and where applicable, its Boards and to repeal By-law 2018-6814. Carried.
Resolution 2019 – 119. THAT pursuant to By-law 2019 – 6977, Council authorizes electronic participating members of the Wellness Centre and Pool Committee as established by Resolution 2019-087, to vote at its open meetings. Carried

10.4.1 – Renewal of lease with Strong-Sundridge-Joly Arena & Hall for POA Court. By-Law 2019 – 6973. Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with the Corporations of the Township of Strong, Village of Sundridge and Township of Joly, operators of the Sundridge-Strong-Joly Arena and Hall and the Town of Parry Sound, Administrators of the Provincial Offences Court, for the leasing of court facilities. Carried.

 

Council Agenda Preview – October 15, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

It seems to be a pretty bland agenda but looking a little closer there are a few issues that are worth noting and perhaps following up on. It could be reasonably assumed that Staff and Council are trying to reduce transparency and the opportunity for public input into decisions before Council.

9.3.3 – 2020 Council Meeting Dates. The proposal is to drop 4 of the regular meetings and fiddle around with the remainder to have a 2 per month followed by a 1 per month schedule. In my opinion I think that the current meeting schedule is consistent with the obligations that Council assumed when they were elected. If they want to change it they should consider making it a ballot issue at the next municipal election. The proposed reduction in meetings will reduce the opportunities for the Public to interact with Council and present their positions by means of the Deputation process. This has too many transparency ramifications with enough intangible benefits to Council and Staff to permit Council to make the decision on behalf of the taxpayers of this Town.

9.4.1 – 2020 Budgeting Schedule. The proposed schedule has no allowance for a public presentation and then the possibility for taxpayers to provide input into the Budget. Our Town – Our Taxes – Our Budget.

10.1.1 – Encroachment Agreement – 5 Gibson Street. This is the tip of an iceberg. In this case a property has minimally encroached on a Town road allowance for some time and the property owner wants the Town to approve/permit the existing encroachment by agreement. This case seems to be pretty innocuous, but it is something that goes on in numerous places in Town. Why is it an issue? In most cases there is a much larger piece of property involved and these property owners get the exclusive use of land they did not purchase, a saved sum, and they don’t pay property taxes on it, another savings. If there is encroachment and the Town wishes to grant permission to occupy, even only if temporary (years), then there should be an annual lease amount for the land added to the property tax.

If you have an opinion on what’s before Council the time is short to provide your input with Thanksgiving on Monday.

Closed Session

b) personal matter about an identifiable individual, including municipal or local board employees (Taxi License Appeal Hearing)

Public Meeting

2.1 Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/14 – 12 College Drive (M2 Developments Inc. – The Gardens)

2.2 Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/15 – 32 Great North Road (Distler/Ambraska)

2.3 Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/16 – Dennis Drive and Macklaim Drive (Town of Parry Sound)

Correspondence

4.1 – Bill Liggins. Request for Accessible Traffic Signal at Church-Isabella intersection.

4.2 – Tom Dowswell. Suggestion that DSSAB budget go towards small business.

4.3 – Belvedere Heights Home for the Aged. Notice of Annual General Meeting – October 17th, 6:30 PM, Belvedere Heights

Deputations

5.1 – Bill Liggins. Accessible Traffic Signals (ATS).

5.2 – Roger & Olga Little. Waubeek Street maximum speed limit.

5.3 – Fritz Distler. Parry Sound Drive sewer concerns.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.3.1 – Director of Public Works Selection – Sub-Committee of Council Appointments. Direction. That pursuant to the Town hiring policy, the Sub-Committee for the hiring of the Director of Public Works position be composed of the following Members of Council: (Presumably to be completed at the meeting.)

9.3.2 – Parry Sound Founders Circle. Spokesperson: Clayton Harris, CAO. (Read the full agenda for information, it’s really about tax deductible charitable receipts.)

9.3.3 – 2020 Council Meeting Dates. Resolution. That pursuant to By-law 2018-6814, Section 3, paragraph 4, Council approves Schedule “A” as attached, the 2020 schedule of Regular Meetings of Council.

9.3.4 – Strategic Plan Resources. Direction. That staff be authorized to single source the resources necessary to undertake the updating of the Town’s Strategic Plan in the amount of $17,000.

9.4.1 – 2020 Budgeting Schedule. Resolution. That Council hereby approves the 2020 Budgeting Schedule as set out in the attached Schedule “A”.

9.5.1 – Skatepark. Resolution. Whereas Council through the 2019 Budget, approved the development of a comprehensive Parks & Recreation Master Plan, and Whereas the 2019 budget also allocated $30,000 towards skatepark resurfacing and expansion; and Whereas it may be advantageous to await the results of the Parks & Recreation Master Plan with respect to a skatepark Now therefore be it resolved that Council put the Skatepark resurfacing and expansion project on hold.

By-laws

10.1.1 – Encroachment Agreement – 5 Gibson Street. By-law 2019 – 6978. Being a by-law to execute an encroachment agreement with the owner of 5 Gibson Street.

10.2.1 – Official Plan Amendment No. 3 and Rezoning Application Z/19/06 – Smith Crescent (YMCA/Wickman).
By-Law 2019 – 6974. Being a By-law to Adopt Official Plan Amendment No. 3 – Smith Crescent (YMCA/Wickman)
By-Law 2019 – 6975. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for Rezoning Application Z/19/06 – Smith Crescent (YMCA/Wickman)
Resolution: That the Mayor and Clerk be authorized to execute a consent agreement as per Parry Sound Area Planning Board Resolution 2019-061 for application B/04/2019 (PS).

10.2.2 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/13 – 17 Miller Street (Walsh/Ben Prichard Law Corporation). By-Law: 2019 – 6976. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 17 Miller Street (Walsh/Ben Prichard Law Corporation).

10.3.1 – Procedural By-law Update – Permit WCPC electronic participants voting rights. Resolution. Whereas the Wellness Centre Pool Committee established by the seven area municipalities, is desirous of enabling electronic participants to vote at its open meetings, and
Whereas the Town`s Procedural By-law 2018-6814 does not permit electronic participant voting at Council, nor at its boards and committees; and, Whereas proposed By-law 2019-6977 updates the Procedural By-law with minor amendments: i.e. permitting Council by resolution to authorize as it sees fit electronic participants of committees to vote; and making minor housekeeping amendments; Now Therefore Council waives the 21-day public notice provision of amendments to the Procedural By-law as normally required by Provision of Notice Policy as contained in Resolution 2011- 242.
By-law 2019 – 6977. Being a By-law to govern and regulate the proceedings of Council of The Corporation of the Town of Parry Sound, its Committees and where applicable, its Boards and to repeal By-law 2018-6814.
Resolution. THAT pursuant to By-law 2019 – 6977, Council authorizes electronic participating members of the Wellness Centre and Pool Committee as established by Resolution 2019-087, to vote at its open meetings.

10.4.1 – Renewal of lease with Strong-Sundridge-Joly Arena & Hall for POA Court. By-Law 2019 – 6973. Being a By-law to authorize the execution of an agreement with the Corporations of the Township of Strong, Village of Sundridge and Township of Joly, operators of the Sundridge-Strong-Joly Arena and Hall and the Town of Parry Sound, Administrators of the Provincial Offences Court, for the leasing of court facilities.

Council Meeting Minutes (Abridged) – October 1, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

No surprises; decisions and discussion are provided below.

Public Meeting

2.1 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/12 – 11 Miller Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on Behalf of Brian Moore). Subsequent to an explanation of how the public was notified of application Z/19/12 – 11 Miller Street, Manager of Building & Planning Services Taylor Elgie gave an explanation of the purpose of the proposed Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA), being to amend the C1 zone and Committee of Adjustment Application A11-01 to permit an additional dwelling unit within a proposed building. The lands are currently permitted 10 residential units between two buildings, and it is now proposed to contain 11 units between two buildings. Mayor McGarvey invited those in favour of the proposed ZBA to address Council.
John Jackson, agent for Brian Moore, spoke in support of the proposed ZBA, noting that this property has been a converted dwelling for many years, and that a number of years ago Mr. Moore got a Committee of Adjustment approval for an additional dwelling. He was about to renovate it but found that he has capacity to add one more dwelling unit and rather than go back to the Committee and apply for an additional minor variance, he is applying for a rezoning to allow for one more unit over his entitlement. Mr. Jackson reported that one parking spot is allocated for each of the 11 units, although at most, no more than two tenants drive automobiles and there shouldn’t be a parking issue. Mr. Jackson concluded by noting that these units fall within the definition of affordable housing which planners can support.
No one spoke in opposition to the proposed ZBA and Mr. Elgie reported that no letters had been received either in favour or, or in opposition.

2.2 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/13 – 17 Miller Street (Walsh/Ben Prichard Law Corporation). Subsequent to an explanation of how the public was notified of application Z/19/13 – 17 Miller Street, Manager of Building & Planning Services Taylor Elgie gave an explanation of the purpose of the proposed ZBA, being to amend the C1 zone to permit a basement apartment unit. The Zoning By-law requires that accessory units be above or behind commercial units.
No one spoke either in favour of, or in opposition to the proposed ZBA and Mr. Elgie reported that no letters had been received either in favour or, or in opposition.

Mayor McGarvey concluded the public meeting with notice that objections to the passing of the amendments will be received by the Clerk within 20 days from the date such notice is given, which objections will be forwarded to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal. If an appeal is submitted and the appellant has not provided Council with an oral or written submission before the passing of the by-law, the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal may choose to dismiss the appeal.

Questions of Staff

3.2.1 – In response to Councillor Keith’s inquiry regarding the recent work at the CNR track at William Street and the street closed for part of today, Director of Public Works Peter Brown reported that CN had contacted him last week advising of track repairs scheduled this week between Cascade Street crossing and William Street bridge, requiring closure at the William Street bridge today, tomorrow and parts of Thursday and Friday.

3.2.2 – In response to Councillor McCann’s inquiry regarding complaints from Meadow, Beaver and Queen Street areas regarding presence of an unpleasant odour, Director of Public Works Peter Brown reported that he had not yet heard of this complaint, and recommended that the complainants contact Public Works staff directly in order that the odour can be tracked.

Correspondence

4.1 – Madeline & Albert Archibald, Georgian Bay Ave. Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave. Circulated to Mayor & Council and Referred to the Director of Public Works.

4.2 – Dave & Anne MacLennan, Georgian Bay Ave. Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave. Circulated to Mayor & Council and Referred to the Director of Public Works.

4.3 – Dave & Sheila Ord, Georgian Bay Ave. Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave. Circulated to Mayor & Council and Referred to the Director of Public Works.

4.4 – Susan Hrycyna, Executive Director, PS Downtown Business Association. Resignation of Dan DiNicolo from Board of Directors. Circulated to Mayor & Council and filed.

4.5 – Hector Lebert, Poppy Chairman, Royal Canadian Legion Branch #117. Remembrance Day activities. Circulated to Mayor & Council with tag day and raising of poppy flag covered by item 8.1 on the Agenda.

4.6 – Georgian Bay Native Non Profit Homes Incorporated. Partnership proposal to build housing with Wellness Centre & Pool. Circulated to Mayor & Council, with an acknowledgement letter of receipt sent.

4.7 – Parry Sound Affordable Housing Development Corporation. Partnership proposal to build housing with Wellness Centre & Pool. Circulated to Mayor & Council, with an acknowledgement letter of receipt sent.

Deputations

5.1 – Butch Folland. Mr. Folland addressed Council with respect to flooding on Georgian Bay Ave. of eleven of the fifteen townhouse units known as the Cedars. Mr. Folland noted that the units are all on a concrete slab at grade and share a common roof. Mr. Folland reported that he is a new resident there and of his unit has observed that during heavy rains, water lands on the roof, runs down the eaves, down a downpipe, then flows into a pipe buried under his small front lawn. As rain continues to fall, water backs up this pipe and spills onto the cobblestone walkway leading to his front entrance where it pools because there is not enough slope at that area to direct the water away from the building. Mr. Folland reported that in the winter it is worse because the ground is frozen and cannot absorb water, a situation which caused his home to flood in March. Baseboards pulled away, chesterfield was water stained, and rug was destroyed.
Mr. Folland requested that as a priority, Council install a storm drainage pipe running the length of the properties with a link to each townhouse unit. According to Mr. Folland, although this will not solve the problem completely, it will be a step in the right direction. Mr. Folland provided additional details of the work he has done this year in preparation for potential winter flooding when he will not be in Parry Sound, as well as details of the measures that other residents have and are taking.
Mr. Folland reported that he was pleased with the response by Director of Public Works Peter Brown who visited the property, and agreed that the solution is to install a storm drain in front of and link to the townhouses, and that he would include that proposal in the upcoming budget. Mr. Folland requested that Council approve Mr. Brown’s proposal. Mr. Folland concluded by expressing compliments and appreciation for the help he had received from various staff members in response to his inquiries as he researched this issue.

In response to the Mayor’s suggestion, the following motion to direct staff on follow-up was made: That Council hereby directs Director of Public Works Peter Brown to do the engineering costs to correct the drainage problem at Georgian Bay Avenue, so that it can be put in the budget for 2020. Carried

5.2 – Margaret Gain. Flooding at 12 Georgian Bay Ave. Ms. Margaret Gain similarly addressed Council regarding the lack of proper drainage from the Georgian Bay Ave. properties to the street, and the consequent flooding of many of the units. Ms. Gain reported on a specific incident in March when she and others spent all day until midnight scooping water from her walk so it would not flood her home. Ms. Gain reported on what measures she has taken to address the problem including digging up and replacing her front walk, replacing a drainage pipe, having snow removed from her front lawn, and installing heating cables.
Ms. Gain reported that Director of Public Works Peter Brown has acknowledged the problem and promised to add money in the 2020 Public Works budget to address it. Ms. Gain concluded by requesting that the Town support this proposal and that her letter and other letters be brought back at budget time, so as not to lose sight of this issue.

Mayor & Councillors’ Reports

Council agreed to Mayor McGarvey’s direction:
That subsequent to the report at the September 27th District of Parry Sound Municipal Association by Medical Officer of Health Jim Chirico regarding provincial funding cuts resulting in use of reserves in 2020 and projected funding increase of 39% by 2021 downloaded on to municipalities, that Staff have a conversation with the North Bay Parry Sound District Public Health Unit to find out the status, since reserves should not be used to fund this shortfall, and earlier provincial promises were that if provincial funding cuts resulted in more than a 10% increase to municipalities, the province would step in.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.1.1 – RFQ – Gravel and Winter Sand. Resolution. That Council accepts the quotation from Fowler Construction for Granular A gravel in the amount of $16.10 per tonne, including taxes, for the Winter 2019 to Spring 2021 term, this quotation being the only one received. Carried
That Council accepts the quotation from Fowler Construction to supply, deliver, blend, and stack winter sand in the amount of $18.08 per tonne, including taxes, for the Winter 2019 to Spring 2021 term, this quotation being the only one received. Carried

9.1.2 – Tender – Snow Plowing Town Lots. Resolution. That Council award the tender for snow plowing all ten municipal parking lots and facilities to Schlager Inc., in the combined total of $743.53, including HST, per plowing event, this tender being the lowest overall of three tenders received. Carried

9.1.3 – Successful Audit report for the Town of Parry Sound DWQMS Version 2. Direction. That Council receive the Report on the successful audit for the Town of Parry Sound DWQMS Version 2 for information only. Carried

9.2.1 Local Services Policy. Resolution. That Council adopts the Local Services Policy for the Town of Parry Sound, as per the attached Schedule “A”; and That Resolution 2006-71 be rescinded. Carried

By-laws

10.2.1 Site Plan Control By-law Amendment. By-law 2019 – 6967. Being a By-law to Amend By-law 2017-6723, (as amended by By-law 2018-6843), to require Site Plan Control pursuant to Section 41 of the Planning Act. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

Resolution 2019 – 108. That Council waive any application fees related to a site plan control application which apply to Section 4.3 of By-law 2017-6723, as amended; and That the general intent of Section 4.3 and Council is to beautify the streetscape by reducing the amount of parking spaces in the front yard, clearly defining driveways, revegetating and maintaining greenspace. Carried

10.2.2 – Validation By-law – 61 and 63 William Street – Karvonen. By-law 2019 – 6968. Being a By-law to permit the Parry Sound Area Planning Board to issue a Certificate of Validation for 61 and 63 William Street (Karvonen). Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.2.3 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/04 – 14/16 William Street (Henry). By-Law 2019 – 6969. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 14/16 William Street (Henry). Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.2.4 – Sign By-law Amendment – Blade Signs. By-law 2019 – 6970. Being a by-law to amend the sign by-law; add Blade Sign type. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

10.2.5 – Building Permit By-law Amendment – Refund Policy. By-law 2019 – 6971. Being a by-law to amend Table C2 of by-law 2005-4847 – “The Building By-law”. Passed, Signed & Sealed.

Council Agenda Preview – October 1, 2019

Tags

, , , , , , , ,

What’s a better reminder that winter is just around the corner – fall colours, crisp nights, or the Town’s awarding of snow plowing and salt/sand supply contracts?

There really isn’t much to note in this week’s agenda. Take a quick look at the summary below to see if there’s anything that catches your attention. Additional details are available with the full council packages available at the Town’s website.

Some folks may be interested in Items 4.6 and 4.7.

Public Meeting

2.1 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/12 – 11 Miller Street (John Jackson Planner Inc. on Behalf of Brian Moore).

2.2 – Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Z/19/13 – 17 Miller Street (Walsh/Ben Prichard Law Corporation).

Correspondence

4.1 – Madeline & Albert Archibald, Georgian Bay Ave. Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave.

4.2 – Dave & Anne MacLennan, Georgian Bay Ave. Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave.

4.3 – Dave & Sheila Ord, Georgian Bay Ave. Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave.

4.4 – Susan Hrycyna, Executive Director, PS Downtown Business Association Resignation of Dan DiNicolo from Board of Directors.

4.5 – Hector Lebert, Poppy Chairman, Royal Canadian Legion Branch #117. Remembrance Day activities.

4.6 – Georgian Bay Native Non Profit Homes Incorporated. Partnership proposal to build housing with Wellness Centre & Pool.

4.7 – Parry Sound Affordable Housing Development Corporation. Partnership proposal to build housing with Wellness Centre & Pool.

Deputations

5.1 – Madeline & Albert Archibald

5.2 – Butch Folland

5.3 – Margaret Gain (attendance TBC). Flooding at Georgian Bay Ave.

Resolutions and Direction to Staff

9.1.1 – RFQ – Gravel and Winter Sand.
Resolution. That Council accepts the quotation from Fowler Construction for Granular A gravel in the amount of $16.10 per tonne, including taxes, for the Winter 2019 to Spring 2021 term, this quotation being the only one received.
Resolution. That Council accepts the quotation from Fowler Construction to supply, deliver, blend, and stack winter sand in the amount of $18.08 per tonne, including taxes, for the Winter 2019 to Spring 2021 term, this quotation being the only one received.

9.1.2 – Tender – Snow Plowing Town Lots.
Resolution. That Council award the tender for snow plowing all ten municipal parking lots and facilities to Schlager Inc., in the combined total of $743.53, including HST, per plowing event, this tender being the lowest overall of three tenders received.

9.1.3 – Successful Audit report for the Town of Parry Sound DWQMS Version 2.
Direction. DWQMS Version 2 for information only.

9.2.1 – Local Services Policy.
Resolution. That Council adopts the Local Services Policy for the Town of Parry Sound, as per the attached Schedule “A”; and That Resolution 2006-71 be rescinded.

By-laws

10.2.1 – Site Plan Control By-law Amendment.
By-law 2019 – 6967. Being a By-law to Amend By-law 2017-6723, (as amended by By-law 2018-6843), to require Site Plan Control pursuant to Section 41 of the Planning Act.
Resolution. That Council waive any application fees related to a site plan control application which apply to Section 4.3 of By-law 2017-6723, as amended;
and That the general intent of Section 4.3 and Council is to beautify the streetscape by reducing the amount of parking spaces in the front yard, clearly defining driveways, revegetating and maintaining greenspace.

10.2.2 – Validation By-law – 61 and 63 William Street – Karvonen.
By-law 2019 – 6968. Being a By-law to permit the Parry Sound Area Planning Board to issue a Certificate of Validation for 61 and 63 William Street (Karvonen)

10.2.3 – Rezoning Application – Z/19/04 – 14/16 William Street (Henry).
By-Law 2019 – 6969. Being a By-law to amend By-law No. 2004-4653 (The Zoning By-law), as amended, for 14/16 William Street (Henry).

10.2.4 – Sign By-law Amendment – Blade Signs.
By-law 2019 – 6970. Being a by-law to amend the sign by-law; add Blade Sign type.